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Iron Age Scandinavia

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Iron Age Scandinavia

Extent of Pre-Roman Iron Age settlements in Scandinavia, 4th century BC - 1st century BC
The expansion of the Germanic tribes 750 BC – AD 1 (after the Penguin Atlas of World History 1988):
   Settlements before 750 BC
   New settlements by 500 BC
   New settlements by 250 BC
   New settlements by AD 1

Iron Age Scandinavia (or Nordic Iron Age) refers to the Iron Age, as it unfolded in Scandinavia.

Beginnings

The 6th and 5th century BC was a tipping point for exports and imports on the European continent. The ever increasing conflicts and wars between the central European oppida, and the more stable political situation in Europe allowed for a whole new economic development and trade.[1]

[1]

Timeline

The Iron Age in Scandinavia and Northern Europe begins around 500 BC with the Jastorf culture, and is taken to last until ca. AD 800 and the beginning Viking Age. It succeeds the Nordic Bronze Age with the introduction of ferrous metallurgy by contact with the Hallstatt D/La Tène cultures.

The Northern European Iron Age is the locus of Proto-Germanic culture, in its later stage differentiating into Proto-Norse (in Scandinavia), and West Germanic (Ingvaeonic, Irminonic, Istvaeonic) in northern Germany.

Culture and religion

Nordic Iron Age culture
Nordic Iron Age cult

References

  1. ^ a b Jørgen Jensen: I begyndelsen

Sources

  • Jørgen Jensen (2002): I begyndelsen, Gyldendal og Politikens Danmarks Historie (Vol. 1), ISBN 87-89068-26-2 (Danish)
  • Bente Magnus, G Franceschi, Asger Jorn (2005): Men, Gods and Masks in Nordic Iron Age Art.
  • M Zvelebil (1985): Iron Age transformations in Northern Russia and the Northeast Baltic, Beyond Domestication in Prehistoric Europe

See also

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