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Irvington, Virginia

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Irvington, Virginia

Irvington, Virginia
Town
Location of Irvington, Virginia
Location of Irvington, Virginia
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Virginia
County Lancaster
Area
 • Total 1.8 sq mi (4.7 km2)
 • Land 1.5 sq mi (3.9 km2)
 • Water 0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)
Elevation 33 ft (10 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 673
 • Density 449.0/sq mi (173.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 22480
Area code(s) 804
FIPS code 51-40088[1]
GNIS feature ID 1468521[2]

Irvington is a town in Lancaster County, Virginia, United States. The population was 673 at the 2000 census and it is located on a peninsula of land known as the Northern Neck. It is the name also of a historic district.

The original Chesapeake Academy, 1889-1907, was located in Irvington. One of its graduates, Claybrook Cottingham, was later its assistant principal and subsequently in his long academic career the president of both Louisiana College in Pineville and Louisiana Tech University in Ruston.[3]

Contents

  • Historic district 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
  • Features and amenities 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Historic district

Irvington
Irvington, Virginia is located in Virginia
Location King Carter Drive and Irvington Road, Irvington, Virginia
Coordinates
Area 1,107.2 acres (448.1 ha)
Built 1740
Architectural style Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, et al.
Governing body U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
NRHP Reference # 00000895[4]
Added to NRHP December 8, 2000

The historic district, Irvington, also known as Carters Creek, is a 1,107.2-acre (448.1 ha) area that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000. In 2000, it included 149 contributing buildings, 3 contributing sites and one other contributing structure.[4]

Geography

Irvington is located at (37.6615, -76.4191).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km²), of which, 1.5 square miles (3.9 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.9 km²) of it (18.13%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 673 people, 240 households, and 174 families residing in the town. The population density was 449.0 people per square mile (173.2/km²). There were 325 housing units at an average density of 216.8 per square mile (83.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.37% White, 1.49% African American and 0.15% Asian.

There were 240 households out of which 20.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.8% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.61.

In the town the population was spread out with 13.8% under the age of 18, 2.5% from 18 to 24, 13.2% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 46.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 63 years. For every 100 females there were 79.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 72.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $60,139, and the median income for a family was $68,438. Males had a median income of $42,500 versus $25,938 for females. The per capita income for the town was $50,743. About 1.1% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Features and amenities

Irvington is the home of the marine resort The Tides Inn. On King Carter Drive is the Steamboat Museum, which details the history of the steamboats that traveled the Chesapeake Bay and stopped in Irvington.

Lancaster National Bank (later Chesapeake National Bank and currently Chesapeake Bank) was formed in Irvington in 1900 to cater to the growing town. Irvington was also a stop for Chesapeake National Bank's Boat 'n Bank, a houseboat with bank tellers that cruised the Rappahannock River wharves, canneries and oyster houses. The town has a club, Rappahannock River Yacht Club, and a marina, Irvington Marina.

Children of the town attend Lancaster County Public Schools and there is one independent school located in Irvington. Reopened in 1965, Chesapeake Academy serves children from 3 years old through eighth grade. Chesapeake Academy's original 1890 schoolhouse is located on King Carter Drive; it is now the Hope & Glory Inn. Next door to the schoolhouse is the Irvington Methodist Church; its parsonage is now a women's clothing store, The Dandelion.

Since the 1970s American Viticultural Area winemaking appellation.

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ "Cottingham, Claybrook C.". A Dictionary of Louisiana Biography (lahistory.org). Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places.  
  5. ^ "Irvington".  
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links

  • - Local newspaperRappahannock Record
  • Irvington, Virginia is at coordinates .
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