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It's Not Over (Daughtry song)

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It's Not Over (Daughtry song)

"It's Not Over"
Single by Daughtry
from the album Daughtry
Released November 21, 2006 (2006-11-21)
(see Release history)
Recorded 2006
Genre Post-grunge[1]
Length 3:35 (Album Version)
3:27 (Radio Edit)
Label RCA
Writer(s) Chris Daughtry, Ace Young, Gregg Wattenberg, Mark Wilkerson
Producer(s) Howard Benson
Daughtry chronology
"It's Not Over"
(2006)
"Home"
(2007)
Alternative cover
Deleted UK single cover

"It's Not Over" is the first official single from Daughtry's self titled debut studio album. The song was used as a teaser to the second season fall finale of Prison Break. It was certified Platinum in April 2007. As of August 2007 it was in the top ten digital selling songs of the year.[2]

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Music video 2
    • Production and reception 2.1
    • Plot 2.2
  • Reception 3
    • Critical 3.1
    • Commercial 3.2
  • Release history 4
    • Chart performance 4.1
    • Year-end charts 4.2
  • Track listing 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Background

The song was written by Chris Daughtry, Ace Young (who was on American Idol with Daughtry), Gregg Wattenberg, Mark Wilkerson and produced by Howard Benson.

Music video

Production and reception

After much speculation on when and even if a video would be released, the video was finally released on AOL on January 10, 2007.[3] The video was co-directed by Dean Karr and Jay Martin (Karr directed the performance scenes while Martin did the narrative scenes).

Plot

It begins with a man lying in bed while he has a flashback of himself gathering his personal effects upon release from prison. A woman is then shown picking him up after his release; they hug and hold hands along the way. After a time they stop at a store. While he is inside, she has a flashback to when she first heard the news of his arrest, and we see that she was pregnant at the time. The man gets back in the car with a stuffed rabbit. They then arrive at the woman's home, and there is a young girl inside, presumably the couple's daughter. The woman is seen explaining something to the girl while the man waits outside. He then enters and gives the toy to his daughter, whom he has never met before. After a reluctant moment, the two hug.

The video cuts back to the couple lying in bed, and they seem to be distant; when he attempts to touch her, she pulls away. Intercut with this scene is the man looking for a job, which proves to be unsuccessful. He walks by and enters several stores, none of which is hiring. He passes a jewelry store, and all the recent positive events flash before him: his release, his daughter, and a rosary. He then notices a "Help Wanted" sign and inquires inside the garage; he gets the job as a car mechanic. He again passes the jewelry store, and sees brief flashes of the couple making love, his booking photos and a cross. He is then seen working in the shop, apparently now employed. One night, as his girlfriend waits for him — visibly upset — he is shown entering the jewelry store, looking at first as if he is going to rob it. When he finally arrives home, his girlfriend opens the door wondering where he's been, he drops to one knee and presents the ring; the girlfriend is overjoyed, and the video ends with the two embracing.

Intercut throughout the video are scenes with scenes of the band playing the song in an immaculate looking grand room, it is of the main atrium of the Surrogate's Courthouse in New York City.

Reception

Critical

Most critics found "It's Not Over" to be catchy and a solid first single. Billboard magazine called "It's Not Over" a "tight, focused and ready to rock your face off" single that "overflows with harmonies and axe leads that suck you in out of the box."[4] Entertainment Weekly found the song "ridiculously catchy".[5] Daniel Wolfe of About.com said the band does "a great job of telling the story of a relationship gone wrong," ultimately giving the song three and a half out of five stars.[6] There has been some talk of the single's similarity to the Fuel's song, "Hemorrhage (In My Hands)", which Chris Daughtry performed on American Idol.

On December 6, 2007, the song was nominated for Best Rock Song and Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for the 50th Annual Grammy Awards.

Commercial

The single debuted fairly high on the Billboard Hot 100 at number 65 in late November 2006,[7] partly due to the song already reaching the top 40 on iTunes. It has since gone on to become a top 5 single for the band, peaking at number four on the Billboard Hot 100.[8] It has also become a number one single for the band on the Adult Top 40 chart and on the American Top 40 countdown. The main version of the song has sold 2,103,000 copies in the United States as of April 2010,[9] and the combined sales of different versions of the song exceeded 3 million.[10]

On the international scene, the song, along with the album, appeared in the New Zealand RIANZ Top 40 Charts, the song debuting at number 38 on the Singles Chart, and the album debuting at number 17 on the Album Chart.[11] The single made the top 10 in New Zealand. The single was to be released in the UK on August 6, 2007, but was deleted at the last minute.[12] In the Philippines, the single placed number 2 in the 2007 Magic 89.9 Yearender Countdown after spending more than a month at the top spot in the weekly countdown, behind Elliot Yamin's Wait For You.

In the August 2007 issue of Guitar World magazine, a full transcription as well as pedal settings was featured for this song. The pedal settings, for the BOSS CE-5 Chorus Ensemble, ML-2 Metal Core & CS-3 Compression/Sustainer, allow readers to get the actual sound of the song as it appears on the Daughtry record.

Release history

Region Date Label
United States November 21, 2006 (2006-11-21) RCA Records
United Kingdom August 6, 2007 (2007-08-06)

Chart performance

Chart (2006–07) Peak
position
Australia ARIA Singles Chart 22
Austria Top 75 Singles 65
Canada (Canadian Hot 100) 9
German Top 100 Singles 38
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40) 22
New Zealand RIANZ Singles Chart 8
Swiss Top 100 Singles 77
US Billboard Hot 100 4
US Billboard Mainstream Top 40 1
US Billboard Adult Top 40 1
US Billboard Adult Contemporary 18
US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks 17
US Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks 5

Year-end charts

Charts (2007) Position
Australian Singles Chart[13] 80
US Billboard Hot 100[14] 17

Track listing

  1. It's Not Over (Album Version)
  2. It's Not Over (Acoustic)

References

  1. ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/r1069760
  2. ^ "User account". The Official Daughtry Website. 
  3. ^ http://mp.aol.com/video.index.adp?mxid=1810326&_AOLFORM=w708.h344.p7.R1 mp.aol.com
  4. ^ M. B. (December 2, 2006)"It's Not Over". Billboard. 118 (48):46
  5. ^ Gundersen, Edna (March 21, 2007), "It's just beginning for Chris Daughtry". USA Today.:1d
  6. ^ Wolfe, Daniel (2006). "Daughtry - It's Not Over" About.com. Retrieved September 20, 2007
  7. ^ Jonathan Cohen, "'Smack' Attack: Akon Adds More No. 1s To His Arsenal", Billboard.com, November 30, 2006.
  8. ^ Katie Hasty, "Beyonce Stays Ahead Of Fall Out Boy Atop Hot 100", Billboard.com, February 1, 2007.
  9. ^ "Yahoo Music". yahoo.com. 
  10. ^ "USA TODAY Idol Chatter: Candid commentary on American Idol performances". USATODAY.COM. 
  11. ^ http://www.rianz.org.nz/rianz/chart.asp Rianz.orf.nz
  12. ^ America’s biggest selling band ‘Draughty’ to play London show : Celebrity News and Gossip
  13. ^ "ARIA Charts – End Of Year Charts – Top 100 Singles 2007".  
  14. ^ "Billboard Hot 100 Year-End 2007". Retrieved 2012-04-15. 

External links

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