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Italian local elections, 2015

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Italian local elections, 2015

Italian local elections, 2015

31 May and 14 June 2015

1,603 city mayors and councils
  First party Second party
 
Leader Matteo Renzi Silvio Berlusconi
Party Democratic Party Forza Italia
Leader since 15 December 2013 16 November 2013

The 2015 Italian local elections were to be held on 31 May, with a second round on 14 June, concurrently with the Regional elections. In Italy, direct elections were held in 1063 comuni: in each comune were chosen mayor and members of the City Council. Of the 1603 comuni, 15 were capoluoghi and 120 had a population higher than 15,000 inhabitants.[1]

In Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Aosta Valley the elections were held on 10 May with a second ballot on 24 May.

Municipal councilors and mayors ordinarily serve a terms of five years.

Contents

  • Voting System 1
  • Results 2
    • Party Votes 2.1
    • Mayoral results 2.2
    • City councils 2.3
  • Results in the capital cities 3
    • Trento 3.1
    • Bolzano 3.2
    • Aosta 3.3
    • Venice 3.4
  • Notes 4

Voting System

The voting system is used for all mayoral elections in Italy, in the city with a population higher than 15,000. Under this system voters express a direct choice for the mayor or an indirect choice voting for the party of the candidate's coalition. If no candidate receives at least 50% of votes, the top two candidates go to a second round after two weeks. This gives a result whereby the winning candidate may be able to claim majority support, although it is not guaranteed.

The election of the City Council is based on a direct choice for the candidate with a preference vote: the candidate with the majority of the preferences is elected. The number of the seats for each party is determined proportionally.

Results

Majority of each coalition in 120 comuni which have a population higher than 15,000 inhabitants:

Party Political leaning of party Comuni
Democratic Party and allies Center-left 41
Forza Italia and allies Center-right 24
Five Star Movement Big tent[2] 5
Independents and others none 45

Party Votes

Party votes in 20 capoluoghi:

Party Votes
Democratic Party
Five Star Movement
Forza Italia
Left Ecology Freedom
Brothers of Italy
New Centre-Right
Lega Nord

Mayoral results

Cities Population Incumbent mayor Party Elected mayor Party
Aosta 35,031 Bruno Giordano UV Fulvio Centoz PD
Bolzano 106,075 Luigi Spagnolli PD Luigi Spagnolli PD
Trento 117,311 Alessandro Andreatta PD Alessandro Andreatta PD
Venice 264,919 Vittorio Zappalorto[3] none Luigi Brugnaro Ind
Mantua 48,684 Mario Sodano FI Mattia Palazzi PD
Lecco 48,174 Virginio Brivio PD Virginio Brivio PD
Rovigo 50,590 Claudio Ventrice[4] none Massimo Bergamin LN
Chieti 52,218 Umberto Di Primio FI Umberto Di Primio FI
Matera 60,505 Salvatore Adduce PD Raffaello De Ruggieri Ind
Andria 100,459 Nicola Giorgino FI Nicola Giorgino FI
Trani 55,810 Maria Rita Iaculli[5] none Amedeo Bottaro PD
Vibo Valentia 33,609 Nicola D'Agostino FI Elio Costa FI
Enna 28,280 Paolo Garofalo PD
Nuoro 37,358 Alessandro Bianchi PD Andrea Soddu Ind
Macerata 41,625 Romano Carancini PD Romano Carancini PD
Fermo 37,834 Vittorio Saladino[6] none Paolo Calcinaro Ind
Arezzo 99,392 Stefano Gasperini PD Alessandro Ghinelli FI
Sanluri 8,556 Alessandro Collu Ind Alberto Urpi Ind
Tempio Pausania 14,367 Romeo Frediani PD Andrea Mario Biancareddu Ind
Agrigento 60,075 Luciana Giammanco[7] none Calogero Firetto UDC

City councils

City PD FI LN SEL M5S FdI NCD Others
Trento 19 1 5 0 2 0 3 6
Bolzano 12 2 5 3 4 1 0 18
Aosta 5 0 2 1 2 0 0 17
Venice 7 3 1 0 2 0 2 17
Mantua 18 5 2 2 1 0 0 0
Lecco 20 1 4 0 0 0 3 0
Rovigo 4 6 9 0 1 0 4 2
Arezzo 8 13 5 1 1 2 0 0
Macerata 16 3 0 2 2 2 2 0
Fermo 3 2 0 1 1 0 0 20
Chieti 7 12 0 0 1 0 8 0
Trani 17 1 0 2 1 1 3 2
Andria 6 17 1 2 4 0 2 0
Matera 10 2 0 0 0 0 1 17
Vibo Valentia 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 20
Agrigento 7 7 0 0 2 0 14 0

Results in the capital cities

Trento

Incumbent mayor: Alessandro Andreatta (PD), elected in 2010

Candidate Coalition First round
Votes %
Alessandro Andreatta PD-PATT 26,420 53.70
Claudio Cia FI-LN-FdI 15,266 31.03
Paolo Negroni M5S 4,123 8.38
Antonia Romano SEL-PRC 2,229 4.53
Paolo Primon Independent 1,164 2.37
Eligible voters 93,941 100.0
Did not vote 40,144 39.9
Voted 53,797 60.1
Blank or invalid ballots 2,227 4.3
Total valid votes 49,202 95.7

Bolzano

Incumbent mayor: Luigi Spagnolli (PD), elected in 2005 and re-elected 2010

Candidate Coalition First round Second round
Votes % Votes %
Luigi Spagnolli PD-SVP 17,983 41.58 17,630 57.70
Alessandro Urzì FI-others 5,508 12.74 12,926 42.30
Carlo Vettori Lega Nord 4,613 10.67
Cecilia Stefanelli SEL-PRC-Greens 4,521 10.45
Rudi Rieder M5S 4,119 9.52
Giovanni Ivan Benussi CasaPound List 2,952 6.83
Others - 3,550 8.21
Eligible voters 78,460 100.00 78,460 100.0
Did not vote 27,171 34.2 46,531 59.3
Voted 51,289 65.8 31,929 40.7
Blank or invalid ballots 2,071 4.6 1,373 4.3
Total valid votes 49,246 95.4 30,556 95.7

Aosta

Incumbent mayor: Bruno Giordano (UV), elected in 2010

Candidate Coalition First round
Votes %
Fulvio Centoz PD-VdA Left-UV-SA 8,935 54.18
Loris Sartore ALPE 2,094 12.70
Nicoletta Spelgatti Lega Nord 1,719 10.42
Luca Giuseppe Lotto M5S 1,577 9.56
Oreste Alexandre Andrione UVP 1,141 6.92
Carola Carpinello SEL-PRC 608 3.69
Luca Lattanzi FI 417 2.53
Eligible voters 28,661 100.0
Did not vote 11,108 38.7
Voted 17,553 61.3
Blank or invalid ballots 820 4.7
Total valid votes 16,773 95.3

Venice

Incumbent mayor: Vittorio Zappalorto (as Special Commissioner)
previously PD), elected in 2010

Candidate Coalition First round Second round
Votes % Votes %
Felice Casson PD-SEL-Greens
Luigi Brugnaro FI-NCD-UDC
Angelo Bellati Lega Nord
Francesca Zaccariotto FdI-others
Davide Scano M5S
Others
Eligible voters 100.00
Did not vote
Voted
Blank or invalid ballots
Total valid votes

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.interno.gov.it/mininterno/exports/default/it/temi/elezioni/
  2. ^ M5S is considered populist, anti-corruption, environmentalist and Eurosceptic.
  3. ^ Special Commissioner since June 2014.
  4. ^ Special Commissioner since July 2014.
  5. ^ Special Commissioner since January 2015.
  6. ^ Special Commissioner since February 2015.
  7. ^ Special Commissioner since July 2014.
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