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Japanese missions to Joseon

Japanese missions to Joseon represent a crucial aspect of the international relations of mutual Joseon-Japan contacts and communication.[1] The bilateral exchanges were intermittent.

The unique nature of these bilateral diplomatic exchanges evolved from a conceptual framework developed by the Chinese.[2] Gradually, the theoretical model would be modified. The changing model mirrors the evolution of a unique relationship between two neighboring states.[3]

Contents

  • Muromachi shogunate missions to Joseon 1
  • Tokugawa shogunate missions to Joseon 2
  • Japanese-Joseon diplomacy adapting 3
    • 1876 3.1
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Muromachi shogunate missions to Joseon

The Muromachi bafuku's diplomatic contacts and communication with the Joseon court encompassed informal contacts and formal embassies. Muromachi diplomacy also included the more frequent and less formal contacts involving the Japanese daimyo (feudal lord) of Tsushima Island.

In addition, trade missions between merchants of the area were frequent and varied.[4]

Year Sender Japanese chief envoy Joseon monarch Comments
1403 Ashikaga Yoshimochi Taejo .
1404 Ashikaga Yoshimitsu[5] Taejong .
1432 Ashikaga Yoshinori[6] Sejong .
1456 Ashikaga Yoshimasa[7] Sejo .
1474 Ashikaga Yoshihisa[8] Seongjong .
1499 Ashikaga Yoshizumi[9] Yeonsangun .
  • 1403 – A Japanese diplomatic mission from the Japanese shogun, Ashikaga Yoshimochi, was received in Seoul; and this set in motion the beginnings of a decision-making process about sending a responsive mission to Kyoto.[10][11][12]
  • 1404 – Former-Shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu causes a message to the Joseon king to be sent; and the sender is identified as "king of Japan". The salutation construes the Joseon monarch as the sender's co-equal peer.[5]
  • 1474 – Shogun Ashikaga Yoshihisa sent an ambassador to China, stopping en route at the Joseon court in Seoul. The ambassador's charge was to seek an official seal from the Imperial Chinese court.[8]
  • 1499 – Shogun Ashikaga Yoshizumi dispatched an envoy to the Joseon court asking for printing plates for an important Buddhist text; and although the specific request was not fulfilled, the Joseon court did agree to offer printed copies.[9]

Tokugawa shogunate missions to Joseon

In the Edo period of Japanese history, diplomatic missions were construed as benefiting the Japanese as legitimizing propaganda and as a key element in an emerging manifestation of Japan's ideal vision of the structure of an international order with Edo as its center.[14]

Japanese-Joseon diplomacy adapting

Japanese-Joseon bilateral relations were affected by the increasing numbers of international contacts which required adaptation and a new kind of diplomacy.[15]

1876

The Korea-Japan Treaty of 1876 marked the beginning of a new phase in bilateral relations.[15]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ 한일관계사연구논집편찬위원회. (2005). 통신사・왜관과한일관계 (Han Il kwangyesa yŏngu nonjip), Vol. 6, p. 29.
  2. ^ Kang, Etsuko H. (1997). Diplomacy and Ideology in Japanese-Korean Relations: from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century, p. 81.
  3. ^ Toby, Ronald P. (1991). p. 87.State and Diplomacy in Early Modern Japan: Asia in the Development of the Tokugawa Bakufu,
  4. ^ Ferris, William. (2009). 181.Japan to 1600: a Social and Economic History,
  5. ^ a b Hall, John Whitney. (1997). The Cambridge History of Japan: Early Modern Japan, p. 242.
  6. ^ a b Titsingh, Issac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 335.
  7. ^ a b Titsingh, p. 348.
  8. ^ a b Titsingh, p. 358.
  9. ^ a b Titsingh, p. 363.
  10. ^ Kang, Etsuko H. (1997). p. 275.Diplomacy and Ideology in Japanese-Korean Relations: from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century,
  11. ^ (1404-10-28) (in Korean) 태종 8권, 4년(1404 갑신 / 명 영락(永樂) 2년) 10월 24일(임진) 2번째기사 전서(典書) 여의손(呂義孫)을 일본국(日本國)에 보내어, 국왕에게 보빙(報聘)하였다. Taejong Sillok, Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, vol. 8.
  12. ^ (1404-10-24) (in Korean) 태종 8권, 4년(1404 갑신 / 명 영락(永樂) 2년) 10월 24일(임진) 2번째기사 일본 국왕의 사신이 예궐하여 하직인사 하다 Taejong Sillok, Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, vol. 8.
  13. ^ a b c d e f Kang, p. 276.Diplomacy and Ideology,
  14. ^ Walker, Brett L. "Foreign Affairs and Frontiers in Early Modern Japan: A Historiographical Essay," Early Modern Japan. Fall, 2002, p. 48.
  15. ^ a b Kang, Woong Joe. (2005). pp. 38-78.Struggle for Identity,

References

  • Ferris, William Wayne. (2009). Japan to 1600: a Social and Economic History. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 10-ISBN 0-824-83379-1/13-ISBN 978-0-824-83379-4
  • Hall, John Whitney. (1997). The Cambridge History of Japan: Early Modern Japan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 10-ISBN 0-521-22355-5; 13-ISBN 978-0-521-22355-3; OCLC 174552485
  • (Korean) 한일관계사연구논집편찬위원회. (2005). 통신사・왜관과한일관계 (Han Il kwangyesa yŏngu nonjip, Vol. 6). 경인문화사. 10-ISBN 8-949-90308-3/13-ISBN 978-8-949-90308-8.
  • Kang, Etsuko Hae-jin. (1997). Diplomacy and Ideology in Japanese-Korean Relations: from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century. Basingstoke, Hampshire; Macmillan. 10-ISBN 0-312-17370-9/13-ISBN 978-0-312-17370-8; OCLC 243874305
  • Kang, Woong Joe. (2005). The Korean Struggle for International Identity in the Foreground of the Shufeldt Negotiation, 1866-1882. Latham, Maryland: University Press of America. 10-ISBN 0-761-83120-7/13-ISBN 978-0-761-83120-4; OCLC 238760185
  • Titsingh, Isaac, ed. (1834). [Siyun-sai Rin-siyo/Hayashi Gahō, 1652], Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. OCLC 84067437
  • Toby, Ronald P. (1991). State and Diplomacy in Early Modern Japan: Asia in the Development of the Tokugawa Bakufu. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 10-ISBN 0-804-71951-9/13-ISBN 978-0-804-71951-3; OCLC 25473164
  • Walker, Brett L. "Foreign Affairs and Frontiers in Early Modern Japan: A Historiographical Essay," Early Modern Japan. Fall, 2002, pp. 44-62, 124-128.

External links

  • UNESCO: Map of South and North Korea in Eight Province
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