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Jasper County, Texas

Jasper County, Texas
Jasper County Courthouse
Map of Texas highlighting Jasper County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1837
Named for William Jasper
Seat Jasper
Largest city Jasper
Area
 • Total 970 sq mi (2,512 km2)
 • Land 939 sq mi (2,432 km2)
 • Water 31 sq mi (80 km2), 3.2%
Population
 • (2010) 35,710
 • Density 38/sq mi (15/km²)
Congressional district 36th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website .us.tx.jasper.cowww

Jasper County is a

  • Jasper-Newton-Sabine Counties - Office of Emergency Management & Homeland Security
  • Jasper County Government Website
  • Jasper Newton County Public Health District Public Health Website for Jasper County
  • The Deep East Texas Council of Governments (DETCOG)
  • Jasper County from the Handbook of Texas Online
  • Jasper County, TXGenWeb Focuses on genealogical research in Jasper County.

External links

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries.  
  4. ^ "Jasper County". Texas Almanac. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  5. ^ Glenn Justice (June 15, 2010). "Jasper County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  6. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 168. 
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 2, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 2, 2015. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder".  

References

See also

Ghost towns

  • Beech Grove
  • Brookeland
  • Cairo Springs
  • Curtis
  • Erin
  • Gist
  • Gumslough
  • Harrisburg
  • Holly Springs
  • Magnolia Springs
  • Mount Union
  • Roganville

Unincorporated communities

Census-designated places

Cities and towns

Communities

  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #1 - Ronny Billingsley
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #2 - Freddie Miller
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #3 - Mike Smith
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #4 - Becky Cleveland
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #5 - Brett Holloway
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #6 - Steve Conner
  • Constable, Pct. #1 - Kit Stephenson
  • Constable, Pct. #2 - Ralph Nichols
  • Constable, Pct. #3 - Ronnie Hutchison
  • Constable, Pct. #4 - Gene Hawthorne
  • Constable, Pct. #5 - Michael Poindexter
  • Constable, Pct. #6 - Tommy R. Robinson

Courts

  • District Judge - Judicial District 1 - Judge Craig M. Mixson (appointed by Texas Governor Rick Perry to complete term of Judge Gary Gatlin, who resigned effective December 31, 2011)
  • District Judge - Judicial District 1A - Judge Jerome Owens
  • District Clerk - Kathy Kent
  • District Attorney - Steven M. Hollis

District officials

  • County Judge - Judge Mark W. Allen
  • Commissioner, Pct. #1 - Charles Shofner, Jr.
  • Commissioner, Pct. #2 - Roy Parker
  • Commissioner, Pct. #3 - Willie Stark
  • Commissioner, Pct. #4 - Vance Moss
  • County Sheriff - Mitchel Newman
  • Tax Assessor/Collector - Bobby Biscamp
  • County Clerk - Debbie Newman
  • County Treasurer - René Kelley
  • County Auditor - Renee Weaver
  • Tax Appraiser - David Luther
  • Emergency Management Coordinator - Billy Ted Smith

County officials

Government

The median income for a household in the county was $30,902, and for a family was $35,709. Males had a median income of $31,739 versus $19,119 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,636. About 15.00% of families and 18.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.40% of those under age 18 and 17.80% of those age 65 or over.

In the county, the population was distributed as 26.50% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

Of the 13,450 households, 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.20% were married couples living together, 12.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.90% were not families. About 23% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.03.

As of the census[11] of 2000, 35,604 people, 13,450 households, and 9,966 families resided in the county. The population density was 38 people per square mile (15/km²). The 16,576 housing units averaged 18 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.24% White, 17.81% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.04% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. About 3.89% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Demographics

National protected areas

Adjacent counties

Major highways

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 970 square miles (2,500 km2), of which 939 square miles (2,430 km2) is land and 31 square miles (80 km2) (3.2%) is covered by water.[7]

Geography

Contents

  • Geography 1
    • Major highways 1.1
    • Adjacent counties 1.2
    • National protected areas 1.3
  • Demographics 2
  • Government 3
    • County officials 3.1
    • District officials 3.2
    • Courts 3.3
  • Communities 4
    • Cities and towns 4.1
    • Census-designated places 4.2
    • Unincorporated communities 4.3
    • Ghost towns 4.4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

[6] hero.American Revolutionary War, an William Jasper It is named for [5][4][3]

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