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Jim Turner (baseball)

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Jim Turner (baseball)

Jim Turner
Pitcher
Born: (1903-08-06)August 6, 1903
Antioch, Tennessee
Died: November 29, 1998(1998-11-29) (aged 95)
Nashville, Tennessee
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 30, 1937, for the Boston Bees
Last MLB appearance
September 13, 1945, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 69–60
Earned run average 3.22
Strikeouts 329
Teams
Career highlights and awards

James Riley Turner (August 6, 1903 – November 29, 1998) was a pitcher and coach in Major League Baseball. As a member of the Reds and Yankees, he was a member of nine World Series Championship teams between 1940 and 1959, two as a player and seven as a coach. Most notably, he was pitching coach for the New York Yankees under Casey Stengel from 1949 to 1959, during which time they won seven titles. Apart from his baseball career, Turner was a lifelong resident of Nashville, Tennessee.

Career

From 1937 through 1945, he played for the Boston Bees (1937–39), Cincinnati Reds (1940–42) and New York Yankees (1942–45). Turner's Major League career got off to a late start, as he did not reach the big leagues until he was 33 years old. He led the National League in earned run average in 1937 as a rookie with Boston. Because he worked for his family's dairy farm in the offseason in Antioch, Tennessee, he was known as "Milkman Jim" to his fans.

For his career, Turner compiled a 69–60 record in 231 games, with a 3.22 earned run average and 329 strikeouts. He was a member of two World Series championship teams, the 1940 Reds and the 1943 Yankees, as well as the 1942 Yankees team that won the American League pennant. In two postseason appearances, Turner was 0–1 with a 6.43 ERA and 4 strikeouts in 7 innings pitched.

After his pitching career ended, Turner served the Yankees (1949–59; 1966–73) and Reds (1961–65) as their pitching coach, working for ten pennant-winning clubs over that 24-year span. He also managed the Beaumont Exporters (1946), Portland Beavers (1947–48) and Nashville Volunteers (1960).

Turner was criticized by

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