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Joe Young (lyricist)

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Joe Young (lyricist)

Joe Young
Born (1889-07-04)July 4, 1889
Died April 21, 1939(1939-04-21) (aged 49)
New York City, United States
Occupation(s) Lyricist
Years active 1911–1930s
Associated acts Mort Dixon, Harry Warren, Sam M. Lewis

Joe Young (July 4, 1889 – April 21, 1939) was a lyricist. He was born in New York. Young was most active from 1911 through the late-1930s, beginning his career working as a singer and songplugger for various music publishers. During World War I, he entertained the U.S. Troops, touring Europe as a singer.

The Laugh Parade

For the 1931 Broadway show The Laugh Parade, Young collaborated with co-lyricist Mort Dixon and composer Harry Warren on "You're My Everything". The show also included:

  • "Ooh! That Kiss"
  • "Love Me Forever"
  • "That Torch Song"
  • "Joseph Young III"

Later efforts

His last work was the famous standard "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter", written with Fred Ahlert in 1935.

Joe Young died in New York. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970.

External links

  • Joe Young's entry at the Songwriters' Hall of Fame
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