World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Joey Fink

Joey Fink
Personal information
Full nameJoseph Fink
Date of birth (1951-07-31) July 31, 1951 (age 62)
Place of birthNew York, New York, United States
Height5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Playing positionForward
Youth career
New York University
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1973-1975New York Cosmos42(20)
1976-1978Tampa Bay Rowdies30(5)
1978-1981Philadelphia Fever (indoor)93(111)
1979California Sunshine23(15)
1980New York United14(9)
1980Cleveland Cobras22(12)
1981Carolina Lightnin'14(6)
1981-1985Baltimore Blast (indoor)177(122)
Total415(300)
National team
1973-1975United States6(0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Joey Fink (born July 31, 1951 in New York City) is a retired American soccer forward who spent six seasons in the North American Soccer League, two in the American Soccer League and seven in Major Indoor Soccer League. He also earned six caps with the U.S. national team between 1973 and 1975.

Youth and college

Fink played youth soccer with Blau-Weiss Gottschee.[1] He attended Steinert High School in Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey.[2] He went to college at New York University where he was a 1971 honorable mention (third team) All American soccer player. That season he scored a school record eighteen goals. He was inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame on May 10, 2008.[3]

Professional

In 1973, the New York Cosmos of the North American Soccer League (NASL) drafted Fink in the first round of the NASL College Draft. That year he began the first four games on the bench. In the fifth game of the season, Fink came off the bench and scored three goals. He ended the season with eleven goals in twelve starts and three late game appearances.

National team

Fink earned his first cap with the U.S. national team in a 1-0 win over Bermuda on September 9, 1973. He went on to play a total of six games with the national team, his last coming in a 2-0 loss to Mexico on August 24, 1975.[5]

References

External links

  • Philadelphia Fever profile
  • NASL/MISL stats
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.