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John Carmichael (Scientology)

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John Carmichael (Scientology)

John Carmichael
John Carmichael in May 2008
Born 1947[1]
United States
Residence New York
Nationality American
Citizenship United States
Employer Church of Scientology International
Religion Scientology
Children 1

John Carmichael (born 1947) is president of the Oregon.

He has served as the President of the Church of Scientology of New York since 1987. In 1993 Carmichael was New York Contributing Editor to the Church of Scientology's publication: Freedom Magazine. Carmichael supervised the efforts of the Church of Scientology's New Jersey and New York.

Career

Early work in Scientology

Carmichael was born a Presbyterian, and grew up in Florida and Illinois.[1] Having become an atheist, he began to learn about Scientology after reading Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health while attending college at Cornell University.[1]

He became an ordained minister with the Church of Scientology in 1973 and says he has devoted "half his life to the religion" because "it works".[1] In 1985, he was President of the Scientology mission in Portland, Oregon,[2][3] and also head of the Church of Scientology's operations in the State of Oregon.[4][5]

President of the Church of Scientology of New York

John Carmichael in February 2008 – the Church of Scientology building in New York City is visible in the background

Carmichael has served as the President of the Church of Scientology of New York since 1987,[6] and has performed work for the Church of Scientology in New Jersey and New York in 2006,[8] and is a regional spokesperson for Scientology.[9] In 1993 Carmichael was New York Contributing Editor to the Church of Scientology's publication: Freedom Magazine.[10]

Carmichael oversaw efforts of the Church of Scientology's Volunteer Ministers group at Ground Zero after 9/11.[11] "The overall purpose of Scientology is to create a better world. By getting volunteers out in the community, helping individuals one-on-one, that's one way we can do it," said Carmichael in an interview with The Journal News about the Church of Scientology's activities at Ground Zero.[11] He appeared on a special Fox News program "Attack on America" on September 16, 2001, explaining to correspondent Rick Leventhal activities of members of the Church of Scientology at the Ground Zero work site.[12]

In 2002, Carmichael was recognized for his efforts by being named as a recipient of the Church of Scientology's "International Association of Scienologists Freedom Medal".[13] In 2006, Carmichael heard about a musical which was in production in New York City which parodied Scientology called: A Very Merry Unauthorized Children's Scientology Pageant.[14] He showed up unannounced at a rehearsal of the play to complain, and also sent a letter of complaint to Kyle Jarrow, the play's author.[14]

In November 2007, Carmichael was one of a group of Scientologists invited by Tom Cruise to attend a private screening of the film Lions for Lambs, along with other stars of the film and their guests.[15] In May 2008 Carmichael was involved in an altercation with anti-Scientology protesters near a Church of Scientology building in New York City.[16][17]

References

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External links

  • Scientology NYC Organization homepage
  • Rev. John Carmichael, Church of Scientology (Gothamist interview)
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