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June 2011 lunar eclipse

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Title: June 2011 lunar eclipse  
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June 2011 lunar eclipse

Total lunar eclipse
June 15-16, 2011

The eclipse as seen from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

The moon passes right to left through the Earth's shadow
Series (and member) 130 (34 of 72)
Gamma 0.0897
Duration (hr:mn:sc)
Totality 01:41:11
Partial 3:39:58
Penumbral 5:39:10
Contacts (UTC)
P1 17:23:05
U1 18:22:37
U2 19:22:11
Greatest 20:12:37
U3 21:03:22
U4 22:02:35
P4 23:02:15

The moon's hourly motion across the Earth's shadow in the constellation of Ophiuchus (north of Scorpius)

A total lunar eclipse took place on June 15, 2011. It was the first of two such eclipses in 2011. The second occurred on December 10, 2011.

This was a relatively rare central lunar eclipse, in which the center point of Earth's shadow passes across the Moon. The last time a lunar eclipse was closer to the center of the earth's shadow was on July 16, 2000. The next central total lunar eclipse will be on July 27, 2018 over South America, western Africa, and Europe, and setting over eastern Asia.

Contents

  • Visibility and viewing 1
  • Photo gallery 2
  • Related eclipses 3
    • Semester series 3.1
    • Saros series 3.2
    • Tritos series 3.3
    • Inex series 3.4
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • External links 6
  • References 7

Visibility and viewing

In western Asia, Australia, and the Philippines, the lunar eclipse was visible just before sunrise.[1] It was very visible in the clear and cloudless night sky throughout eastern and southeast Asia. Africa, far eastern Russia and Europe witnessed the whole event even in the late stages (as in partial lunar eclipse). The Americas (including North and northwestern South America) missed the eclipse completely (except in most areas) because it occurred at moonset.

According to PAGASA, the presence of pollutants over the metropolis which penetrates the reddish appearance of the Moon during the greatest stages of the eclipse and sunlight attracts into the atmosphere in the form of red light in contrast to July 1953 and July 2000 lunar eclipses with the same coloration.


Visibility map

This simulation shows the view of the earth from the moon at greatest eclipse.

Photo gallery

Animations

Novosibirsk, Russia

Related eclipses

It was preceded by the partial solar eclipse of January 4, 2011, and the partial solar eclipse of June 1, 2011.

Semester series

This eclipse is the center of nine lunar eclipses in a short-lived series. Each eclipse in the series repeats after one semester (6 lunations or 177 days) occurring at alternating nodes.

Lunar eclipse series sets from 2009–2013
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros #
Photo
Date
Viewing
Type
chart
Saros #
Photo
Date
Viewing
Type
chart
110 2009 July 07
penumbral
115
2009 Dec 31
partial
120
2010 June 26
partial
125
2010 Dec 21
total
130
2011 June 15
total
135
2011 Dec 10
total
140
2012 June 04
partial
145 2012 Nov 28
penumbral
150 2013 May 25
penumbral
Last set 2009 Aug 06 Last set 2009 Feb 9
Next set 2013 Apr 25 Next set 2013 Oct 18

Saros series

Lunar saros series 130, repeating every 18 years and 11 days, has a total of 72 lunar eclipse events including 14 total lunar eclipses.

Greatest First

The greatest eclipse of the series will occur on 2029 Jun 26, lasting 102 minutes.[2]
Penumbral Partial Total Central
1416 Jun 10 1560 Sep 4 1921 Apr 22 1957 May 13
Last
Central Total Partial Penumbral
2083 Jul 29 2155 Sep 11 2552 May 10 2696 Aug 5
1901–2100
1903 Apr 12 1921 Apr 22 1939 May 3
1957 May 13 1975 May 25 1993 Jun 4
2011 Jun 15 2029 Jun 26 2047 Jul 7
2065 Jul 17 2083 Jul 29

Tritos series

The tritos series repeats 31 days short of 11 years at alternating nodes. Sequential events have incremental Saros cycle indices.

This series produces 23 total eclipses between June 22, 1880 and August 9, 2120.

Tritos eclipse series (subset 1901–2100)
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Date
Viewing
Type
chart
Saros Date
Viewing
Type
chart
119 1902 Apr 22
Partial
120 1913 Mar 22
Partial
121 1924 Feb 20
Partial
122 1935 Jan 19
Partial
124 1945 Dec 19
Partial
125 1956 Nov 18
Total
126 1967 Oct 18
Total
127 1978 Sep 16
Total
128 1989 Aug 17
Total
129 2000 Jul 16
Total
130 2011 Jun 15
Total
131 2022 May 16
Total
132 2033 Apr 14
Total
133 2044 Mar 13
Total
134 2055 Feb 11
Total
135 2066 Jan 11
Total
136 2076 Dec 10
Total
137 2087 Nov 10
Total
138 2098 Oct 10
Total

Inex series

The inex series repeats eclipses 20 days short of 29 years, repeating on average every 10571.95 days. This period is equal to 358 lunations (synodic months) and 388.5 draconic months. Saros series increment by one on successive Inex events and repeat at alternate ascending and descending lunar nodes.

This period is 383.6734 anomalistic months (the period of the Moon's elliptical orbital precession). Despite the average 0.05 time-of-day shift between subsequent events, the variation of the Moon in its elliptical orbit at each event causes the actual eclipse time to vary significantly.

All events in this series listed below and more are total lunar eclipses.

Inex series from 1000 to 2500 AD
Ascending node Descending node Ascending node Descending node
Saros Date Saros Date Saros Date Saros Date
96 1027 Apr 23 97 1056 Apr 2 98 1085 Mar 14 99 1114 Feb 21
100 1143 Feb 1 101 1172 Jan 13 102 1200 Dec 22 103 1229 Dec 2
104 1258 Nov 12 105 1287 Oct 22 106 1316 Oct 2 107 1345 Sep 12
108 1374 Aug 22 109 1403 Aug 2 110 1432 Jul 13 111 1461 Jun 22
112 1490 Jun 2 113 1519 May 14 114 1548 Apr 22 115 1577 Apr 2
116 1606 Mar 24 117 1635 Mar 3 118 1664 Feb 11 119 1693 Jan 22
120 1722 Jan 2 121 1750 Dec 13 122 1779 Nov 23 123 1808 Nov 3
124 1837 Oct 13 125 1866 Sep 24 126 1895 Sep 4 127 1924 Aug 14
128 1953 Jul 26
129 1982 Jul 6
130 2011 Jun 15
131 2040 May 26
132 2069 May 6
133 2098 Apr 15
134 2127 Mar 28 135 2156 Mar 7
136 2185 Feb 14 137 2214 Jan 27 138 2243 Jan 7 139 2271 Dec 17
140 2300 Nov 27 141 2329 Nov 7 142 2358 Oct 18 143 2387 Sep 28
144 2416 Sep 7 145 2445 Aug 17 146 2474 Jul 29

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Longest lunar eclipse for a decade turns moon blood red", Terry Brown. Clare Peddie. Herald Sun. June 16, 2011. Accessed June 15, 2011
  2. ^ Listing of Eclipses of cycle 130

External links

  • Live-webcast of the lunar eclipse on June 15th, 2011, University of Applied Sciences Offenburg/Germany
  • Live Free Lunar eclipse webcast & hands-on lunar eclipse experiments: 2011-06-15
  • Live eclipse webcasts, Ciclope group/Technical University of Madrid
  • Live eclipse webcasts, Sky Watchers Association of North Bengal
  • Hermit eclipse: 2011-06-15
  • NASA: Lunar Eclipses: Past and Future
    • 2011 Jun 15 chart: Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC
    • Index to Five Millennium Catalog of Lunar Eclipses, −1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)
      • Eclipses: 2001 to 2100
  • Live webcast by Tübitak – the Turkish National Observatory
  • Live webcast from the SLOOH Space Camera and Google Earth. The eclipse stages are also being incorporated into a Google doodle operating during the eclipse.
Webcast
  • The Central Lunar Eclipse was shown live through WEBCAST – By Sky Watchers Association of North Bengal(SWAN) Siliguri, West Bengal [1] or [2]
  • By Eclipse Chaser Athaenium New Delhi [3]
  • By Astronation.net [4]
  • By Ciclope group and Shelios [5]

References

  • Bao-Lin Liu, Canon of Lunar Eclipses 1500 B.C.-A.D. 3000, 1992
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