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Jungle girl (stock character)

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Title: Jungle girl (stock character)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Jana of the Jungle, The Lost World (TV series), Jungle Girl, Rulah, Jungle Goddess, Green Mansions
Collection: Jungle Girls, Jungle Superheroes
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Jungle girl (stock character)

Princess Pantha is an example of a Jungle Girl.

A jungle girl (so-called, but usually adult woman) is an archetype or stock character, often used in popular fiction, of a female adventurer, superhero or even a damsel in distress living in a jungle or rainforest setting.

Jungle girls are generally depicted as wearing either a scanty animal print (usually leopard) bikini or some type of jungle dress made from either fur or leather. Most are barefoot; some are shown in primitive shoes. Some are feral children; some come from a wealthy, educated family that grew up in the jungle. They are the female counterpart of Tarzanesque characters. They are usually depicted either as a tough heroine, perhaps a jungle queen, or as a bound and gagged damsel in distress.

The first such character was Rima from the 1904 novel Green Mansions. One popular character, adapted into various media, is Sheena, Queen of the Jungle, who, though created by American writer-artists Will Eisner and Jerry Iger, made her debut in the British magazine Wags #1 (1937). Sheena went on to star in the American comic book anthology series Jumbo Comics the following year.

List of jungle girl characters

See also

References

  1. ^ Camilla, Jungle Queen at Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on April 9, 2012.
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