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Junkers A 20

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Junkers A 20

A 35
Junkers A 20 "Yesil Bursa"
Role Postal, training and military aircraft
Manufacturer Junkers
Designer Mader and Zindel
Primary user Russian Air Force
Number built 186

Junkers A 35 was a two-seater cantilever monoplane, used for postal, training and military purposes. The aircraft was designed in the 1920s by Junkers in Germany and manufactured at Dessau and by AB Flygindustri in Limhamn, Sweden and conversions from A 20's were made in Fili, Russia.[1]

History

The A 35 was a development of a series of Junkers aircraft from 1918, starting with the J10/J11, the A 20, A 25, A 32, and finally the A 35. It was originally intended as a two-seat multi-purpose fighter aircraft and made its first flight in 1926. Due to the post-war restrictions, Hugo Junkers and the Soviet Government signed a contract about the setup of an aircraft facility at Fili in Russia in December 1922.

In 1926, the first Junkers L5 engines were mounted on the Junkers A 20s. With some further tail modifications the new aircraft was designated as A 35. A total of 24 aircraft were originally built as A 35s. A number of A 20s and A 25s were also modified with the Junkers L5 engine. The A 35 was also available with a BMW IV engine.

Versions

Junkers A 20
The version manufactured in Limhamn was called R02 and the version manufactured in Fili was called Ju 20
Junkers A 20L
Landplane version.
Junkers A 20W
Floatplane version.
Junkers A 25
The version manufactured in Limhamn was called R41 and the version manufactured in Fili was called Type A
Junkers A 35
The militarized version manufactured in Limhamn was called K53/R53 and the version manufactured in Fili was called Type 20.[2]

Operators

 Afghanistan
 Bulgaria
 Chile
21 K53 aircraft[3] were sold to Chinese warlords, 10 to Zhang Zongchang of Shandong, 9 to Zhang Xueliang of Manchuria, 1 to Yan Xishan of Shanxi, 1 sold to Liu Xiang of Sichuan.[4]
 Finland
 Germany
 Iran
Spain Spanish Republic
 Soviet Union
 Turkey
  • Turkish Air Force - 64 A20 aircraft,[6] Together with the Turkish Government Junkers set up a factory at Eskişehir under the name TOMTAŞ. At this factory the delivered A20 aircraft, modified to A35's, were militarized with machine guns and bomb slots.[7]

Specifications (A 35)

Data from Thulinista Hornettiin

General characteristics
  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 1
  • Length: 8.22 m (26 ft 11 in)
  • Wingspan: 15.94 m (52 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 3.50 m (11 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 29.76 m² (320.2 ft²)
  • Empty weight: kg (lb)
  • Loaded weight: kg (lb)
  • Useful load: kg (kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 1,600 kg (3,520 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Junkers L 5, 228 kW (305 hp)[8]

Performance

Notes

See also

  • Junkers K 53 article in German with photo

Related lists
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