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Juno Awards of 1974

 

Juno Awards of 1974

Juno Awards of 1974
Date 25 March 1974
Venue Inn on the Park, Toronto, Ontario
Host George Wilson

The CFRB radio's Starlight Serenade programme.[1]

No television broadcasts had yet been planned for the Junos, prompting the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA) to plan an April 1974 ceremony entitled the Maple Music Awards. Amid some music industry criticism over the proposed competition of awards ceremonies, CRIA backed down from its own ceremonies in February 1974, about a month after the Maple Music Awards were announced. However, this situation forced Juno Awards founder Walt Grealis to prepare for television coverage of the 1975 Juno Awards.

Contents

  • Nominees and winners 1
    • Best Female Vocalist 1.1
    • Best Male Vocalist 1.2
    • Most Promising Female Vocalist of the Year 1.3
    • Most Promising Male Vocalist of the Year 1.4
    • Best Group 1.5
    • Most Promising Group of the Year 1.6
    • Best Songwriter 1.7
    • Best Country Female Artist 1.8
    • Best Country Male Artist 1.9
    • Best Country Group or Duo 1.10
    • Folk Singer of the Year 1.11
    • Best Independent Record Company of the Year 1.12
  • Nominated and winning albums 2
    • Contemporary Album of the Year 2.1
    • Pop Music Album of the Year 2.2
    • Country Album of the Year 2.3
    • Folk Album of the Year 2.4
  • Nominated and winning releases 3
    • Best Single (Contemporary or Pop) 3.1
    • Best Single (Country and Folk) 3.2
  • References 4
    • Notes 4.1
    • General 4.2
  • External links 5

Nominees and winners

Best Female Vocalist

Winner: Anne Murray

Other nominees:

Best Male Vocalist

Winner: Terry Jacks

Other nominees:

Most Promising Female Vocalist of the Year

Winner: Cathy Young

Other nominees:

There were a total of six nominees announced in this category, compared with the normal five nominees in other categories. No explanation for this situation was indicated.

Most Promising Male Vocalist of the Year

Winner: Ian Thomas

Other nominees:

Best Group

Winner: Lighthouse

Other nominees:

Most Promising Group of the Year

Winner: Bachman–Turner Overdrive

Other nominees:

Best Songwriter

Winner: Murray McLauchlan, "Farmer's Song"

Other nominees:

Best Country Female Artist

Winner: Shirley Eikhard

Other nominees:

Best Country Male Artist

Winner: Stompin' Tom Connors

Other nominees:

Best Country Group or Duo

Winner: The Mercey Brothers

Other nominees:

Folk Singer of the Year

Winner: Gordon Lightfoot

Other nominees:

Best Independent Record Company of the Year

Winner: True North Records

Other nominees:

Nominated and winning albums

Contemporary Album of the Year

Winner: Bachman–Turner Overdrive, Bachman–Turner Overdrive

Other nominees:

Pop Music Album of the Year

Winner: Danny's Song, Anne Murray

Other nominees:

Country Album of the Year

Winner: To It and At It, Stompin' Tom Connors

Other nominees:

Folk Album of the Year

Winner: Old Dan's Records, Gordon Lightfoot

Other nominees:

Nominated and winning releases

Best Single (Contemporary or Pop)

Winner: "Seasons in the Sun", Terry Jacks

Other nominees:

Best Single (Country and Folk)

Winner: "Farmer's Song", Murray McLauchlan

Other nominees:

References

Notes

  1. ^ The Juno awards : tenth anniversary special issue.  

General

  • Martin, Robert (27 January 1974). "A new set of awards for Canadian music industry".  
  • "Maple awards fizzle".  
  • Batten, Jack (26 March 1974). "Some surprises in Juno awards".  
  • "Juno nominations ready for voting".  

External links

  • Juno Awards site
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