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List of Bangladesh tropical cyclones

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List of Bangladesh tropical cyclones

Present day Bangladesh, due to its unique geographic location, suffers from devastating tropical cyclones frequently. The funnel-shaped northern portion of the Bay of Bengal causes tidal bores when cyclones make landfall due to which thousands of people living in the coastal areas are affected. Some of the most devastating natural disasters in recorded history with high casualties were tropical cyclones that hit the region now forming Bangladesh. Among them, the 1970 Bhola cyclone alone claimed more than 500,000 lives.

Contents

  • Storm preparedness 1
  • Storms 2
    • Historical records 2.1
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Storm preparedness

Bangladesh lacks any satellites of its own. The three satellite ground stations, in Betbunia, Talibabad, and

  1. ^ Chowdhury, Masud Hasan (2012). "SPARRSO". In  
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Chowdhury, Masud Hasan (2012). "Cyclone". In  
  3. ^ "4. Post Monsoon Season (October — December) Cyclonic Disturbances". Report on Cyclonic Disturbances (Depressions and Tropical Cyclones) over North Indian Ocean in 1990 (PDF) (Report). India Meteorological Department. January 1992. p. 25. Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  4. ^ Carr, Lester E. "3.3 North Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclones". 1990 Annual Tropical Cyclone Report (PDF). Joint Typhoon Warning Center (Report) (United States Navy, United States Airforce). Retrieved January 19, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Cyclone death toll mounts to 2388 in Bangladesh (2nd Roundup)". Monsters & Critics. 17 November 2007. Retrieved 17 November 2007. 

References

See also

  • 1584: A five-hour hurricane and thunderstorm destroyed houses and boats in the coast near Bakerganj (in present-day Patuakhali and Barisal Districts). Only Hindu temples with a strong foundation were spared. Total casualty: about 200,000.
  • 1585: A tropical storm hit the eastern side of Bakerganj (now Barisal) near the mouth of the Meghna River estuary, causing devastation of crops. Casualty: unknown.
  • November 1797: A severe cyclone destroyed most of the houses in the Chittagong) region. Two ships sank in Chittagong Port.
  • May 1822: A cyclone, accompanied by storm surge and tidal bores hit Barisal, Hatiya Island and Noakhali. Casualty: 40,000 people.
  • October 1831 Barisal: Casualty: unknown.
  • October 1872: A cyclone hit Cox's Bazar. Casualty: unknown.
  • 31 October 1876: A cyclone with a storm-surge of 12.2 metres (40 ft) hit Meghna River estuary near Chittagong, Barisal, and Noakhali. Casualty: about 200,000. The storm also caused epidemic and famine, and vast property damage.
  • 24 October 1897 Chittagong: A tropical cyclone accompanied by storm surge hit the area hard, especially near the Kutubdia island. Casualty: 14,000. The resulting epidemic of Cholera killed another 18,000.
  • May 1898 Teknaf: Tropical cyclone with storm surge. Casualty: unknown.
  • November 1904 Sonadia: cyclonic storm; 143 killed and fishing fleet wrecked.
  • 16 October 1909 Khulna: A tropical cyclone accompanied by storm surge. Casualty: 698 people and 70,654 cattle.
  • October 1913 Muktagachha upazila (Mymensingh District): A tropical cyclone, having moved inland destroyed villages. Casualty: 500 people.
  • 24 September 1917 Khulna. A tropical cyclone. Casualty: 432 people and 28,029 cattle.
  • May 1941: A cyclonic storm accompanied by storm-surge hit Eastern Meghna River estuary. Casualty: unknown.
  • October, 1942: A severe cyclonic storm hit The Sundarbans. Casualty: unknown.
  • 17–19 May 1948: A cyclonic storm hit the deltan between Chittagong and Noakhali. Casualty: approximately 1,200 people and 20,000 cattle.
  • 16–19 May 1958: A cyclonic storm accompanied by storm surge hit east and west Meghna River estuary, east of Barisal and Noakhali. Casualty: 870 people and 14,500. Also standing crops were destroyed.
  • 21–24 October 1958: A cyclonic storm struck Chittagong coast. Effect: Approx. 100,000 families were rendered homeless.
  • 9–10 October 1960: A severe cyclonic storm hit Eastern Meghna River estuary near Noakhali, Bakerganj, Faridpur and Patuakhali. The storm had wind speeds of up to 201 km/hour. The maximum storm surge was 3.05 metres. It caused devastating damage in Char Jabbar, Char Amina, Char Bhatia, Ramgati, Hatiya and Noakhali. Casualty: 3,000 people. Other effects: 62,725 houses destroyed. Crops on 94,000 acres (380 km²) of land were destroyed.
  • 30–31 October 1960: A severe cyclonic storm hit Chittagong, Noakhali, Bakerganj, Faridpur, Patuakhali and eastern Meghna estuary, with winds speed up to 210 km/h. The storm surge reached a height of 4.5-6.1 m. Casualty: about 10,000 people, 27,793 cattle . Losses: 568,161 houses destroyed (including 70% houses in Hatiya). Also, two large ocean-going ships ran aground in the shore, and 5-7 vessels capsized in Karnaphuli River.
  • 9 May 1961: A severe cyclonic storm hit Bagerhat and Khulna. It had wind speeds of up to 161 km/h. The storm surge reached 2.44-3.05 m. Casualty: 11,468 people (mostly in Char Alexander), 25,000 cattle. Damages: The railway tracks between Noakhali and Harinarayanpur were damaged.
  • 26–30 October 1962: A severe cyclone hit Feni. Maximum windspeed was 161 km/h. The storm surge was 2.5-3.0 m. Casualty: about 1,000 people, many domestic cattle.
  • 28–29 May 1963: A severe cyclonic storm devastated Chittagong, Noakhali, Cox's Bazar and coastal islands of Sandwip, Kutubdia, Hatiya and Maheshkhali. The storm surge reached 4.3-5.2 m in Chittagong. Maximum windspeed was up to 203 km/h and at Cox's Bazar 164 km/h. Casualty: 11,520 people, 32,617 cattle. Damages: 376,332 houses, 4,787 boats, and standing crops.
  • 11–12 May 1965: A strong cyclone hit Barisal and Bakerganj. The windspeed reached a maximum of 162 km/h. The storm surge was 3.7 m. Casualty:19,279 people (out of that, 16,456 in Barisal).
  • 14–15 December 1965: A strong cyclone hit the coast near Cox's Bazar and Patuakhali. The storm surge rose up to 4.7-6.1 m. The windspeed was up to 210 km/h in Cox's Bazar. Casualty" 873 people. Damage: 40,000 salt beds destroyed.
  • 1 October 1966: A cyclone hit Sandwip, Bakerganj, Khulna, Chittagong, Noakhali and Comilla. Maximum strong surge was 4.7-9.1 m. The maximum wind speed was 146 km/h. Total people affected: 1.5 million people. Casualty: 850 people, 65,000 cattle.
  • 7 November-13 November: The 1970 Bhola cyclone hit the entire coast of Bangladesh (then East Pakistan). Most affected were Chittagong, Barguna, Khepupara, Patuakhali, north of Char Burhanuddin, Char Tazumuddin and south of Maijdi, Haringhata. The official death toll was 500,000 but the number is likely to be higher. Damages include destruction of approximately 20,000 fishing boats, and also property and crops. Total loss of cattle reached more than one million. More than 400,000 houses and 3,500 educational institutions were destroyed. Maximum windspeed reached about 222 km/h. Maximum storm surge was about 10.6 m.
  • 5–6 November 1971: A cyclone hit coastal areas of Chittagong.
  • 28–30 November 1971: A cyclonic storm hit the coast near the Sundarbans. Maximum wind speed was 97–113 km/h. The storm surge reached 1 m. Low lying areas of Khulna town inundated.
  • 6–9 December 1973: The coastal areas near the Sundarbans were hit by a cyclone, accompanied by storm surge. Coastal areas near Patuakhali and nearby islands were submerged under the tidal bore.
  • 13–15 August 1974: A cyclonic storm hit Khulna. Maximum wind speed reached 80.5 km/h. Casualty:600 people.
  • 24–28 November 1974: A cyclone struck the coastal areas near Cox's Bazar and Chittagong, including the offshore islands. Maximum wind speed reached 161 km/h. The storm surge was up to 2.8-5.2 m. Casualty: 200 people, 1000 cattle. Damages: 2,300 houses destroyed.
  • 9–12 May 1975: A strong cyclone pummeled Bhola, Cox's Bazar and Khulna. Maximum wind speed was 96.5 to 112.6 km/h. Casualty: 5 people.
  • 9–12 May 1977: Khulna, Noakhali, Patuakhali, Barisal, Chittagong and offshore islands were hit by a cyclone. Maximum wind speed was up to 112.63 km/h.
  • 14–15 October 1983: A strong cyclone hit the coastal islands and chars near Chittagong and Noakhali. Maximum wind speed reached 122 km/h: Casualty: 43 people. 6 fishing boats and a trawler lost, more than 150 fishermen and 100 fishing boats went missing Damages: 20% of the aman rice crops in the affected regions were destroyed.
  • 5–9 November 1983: A cyclone hit Chittagong, Cox's Bazar coast near Kutubdia, St Martin's Island, Teknaf, Ukhia, Moipong, Sonadia, Barisal, Patuakhali and Noakhali. The maximum wind speed reached 136 km/h. The storm surge was 1.52 m. Casualty:300 fishermen with 50 boats missing. Damages:2,000 houses destroyed.
  • 24–25 May 1985: A severe cyclone hit Chittagong, Cox's Bazar, Noakhali and coastal islands (Sandwip, Hatiya, and Urirchar). Maximum wind speed at Chittagong was 154 km/h, at Sandwip was 140 km/h, at Cox's Bazar was 100 km/h. The storm surge reached a height of 3.0-4.6 m. Casualty:11,069 people, 135,033 cattle. Damages: 94,379 houses and 74 km of road, and embankments destroyed.
  • 8–9 November 1986: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal island and chars near Chittagong, Barisal, Patuakhali and Noakhali. Maximum windspeed was 110 km/h at Chittagong and 90 km/h at Khulna. Casualty: 14 people. Damages: 972 km² of paddy fields were inundated; Schools, mosques, warehouses, hospitals, houses and buildings were destroyed at Amtali upazila in Barguna District.
  • 24–30 November 1988: A severe cyclonic storm struck Jessore, Kushtia, Faridpur and coastal islands of Barisal and Khulna. The maximum windspeed was 162 km/h. The storm was accompanied by a storm surge of 4.5 m at Mongla Port. Casualty: 5,708 people, and numerous wild animals at The Sundarbans (deer 15,000, Royal Bengal Tiger 9), cattle 65,000. Total damage to crops reached Taka 9.41 billion.
  • 18 December 1990: The remnant tropical depression of Severe Cyclonic Storm BOB 09/04B made landfall on 18 December near Cox's Bazar, however, there were no reports of any impact in association with the system.[3][4]
  • 29–30 April 1991: The 1991 Bangladesh cyclone hit Bangladesh late 29 April night. The storm originated in the Indian Ocean and reached the Bay of Bengal coast after 20 days. The diameter of the storm was close to 600 km. The maximum wind speed (observed at Sandwip) reached 225 km/h. At other places, the maximum wind speed was reported as follows: Chittagong 160 km/h, Khepupara (Kalapara) 180 km/h, Kutubdia 180 km/h, Cox's Bazar 185 km/h, and Bhola 178 km/h. (The NOAA-11 satellite estimated the maximum wind speed to be about 240 km/h at 1.38 pm on 29 April). The storm made landfall near the coast north of Chittagong port during the night of the 29th April. The maximum storm surge height reached about 5 to 8 m. Casualty: 150,000 people, 70,000 cattle. Damages: loss of property was estimated at about Tk 60 billion.
  • 31 May-2 June 1991: A cyclone hit the coastal islands and chars near Patuakhali, Barisal, Noakhali and Chittagong. Maximum wind speed reached 110 km/h. The storm surge was 1.9 m.
  • 29 April-3 May 1994: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal islands near Cox's Bazar. Maximum windspeed reached 210 km/h. Casualty: 400 people, 8,000 cattle.
  • 21–25 November 1995: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal islands near Cox's Bazar. The maximum wind speed was up to 210 km/h. Casualty: 650 people, 17,000 cattle.
  • 16–19 May 1997: May 1997 Bangladesh cyclone hit the coastal islands and chars near Chittagong, Cox's Bazar, Noakhali and Bhola districts. The maximum wind speed was 225 km/hour, and the storm surge reached 3.05 metres. Casualty: 126 people.
  • 25–27 September 1997: A severe cyclonic storm hit coastal islands near Chittagong, Cox's Bazar, Noakhali and Bhola. It had wind speeds of up to 150 km/hour, and a storm surge of 1.83 to 3.05 metres.
  • 16–20 May 1998 A severe cyclonic storm with windspeed of 150 km/hour struck coastal islands near Chittagong, Cox's Bazar, and Noakhali. The storm surge was from 1.83 to 2.44 metres.
  • 19–22 November 1998: A cyclonic storm, with wind speeds up to 90 km/hour, and a storm surge of 1.22 to 2.44 metres. hit coastal islands and sand shoals near Khulna, Barisal, and Patuakhali.
  • 15 November 2007: Cyclone Sidr makes landfall on southern Bangladesh, causing over 2,000 deaths and severe damage.[5]

This is a partial list of the tropical cyclones in Bangladesh or the historical region of Bengal of pre-partitioned India in general. Some of the years and dates may be slightly incorrect. Most of the figures have been taken from Banglapedia.[2]

SL. No. Date/Year Type of Disturbance Relevant Information Reference/Source of Information
1. 1582 AD (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm with a core of hurricane winds Coast: The cyclone crossed the coast of Backerganj (Sarkar Bala).

Loss and damage: People killed = 200,000.

The destruction was reported to have been caused by a storm wave.

According to Banglapedia, a five-hour hurricane and thunderstorm destroyed houses and boats in the coast near Bakerganj (presently in Barisal and Patuakhali).[2] Only Hindu temples with a strong foundation were spared.

  • Ain-i-Akbari
  • Riyaz-Us-Salatin
  • Bengal District Gazetteer, 24 Parganas-by L.S.S. O'Malley, ICS, 1914, published- by the Bengal SOC Dept.
2. 1585 (Date and month N/A) N/A A tropical storm hit the eastern side of Bakerganj (now Barisal) near the mouth of the Meghna River estuary, causing devastation of crops.

Casualty: unknown.

  • Banglapedia[2]
3. 1699 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed the Sundarbans coast

Loss and damage: People killed = 1.

Other information is not available.

  • Daily Ittefaq, 5 May 1991.
4. 1760 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed the Sundarbans coast

Loss and damage: N/A. The whole area was almost damaged. Other information is not available.

  • Daily Ittefaq, 5 May 1991.
5. 1765 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast

Loss and damage: N/A. The whole area was destroyed. Other information is not available.

  • Daily Ittefaq, 5 May 1991.
6. 1767 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed Backerganj (Barisal) coast.

Surge height: 13.03 m (43 ft)

Loss and damage:

People killed: 30,000. Other information is not available.

  • Daily Ittefaq, 5 May 1991.
7. May–June, 1797 (Actual date N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm with a core of hurricane winds Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast

Loss and damage: Every house in the area was destroyed. Two ships were sunk in Chittagong Port. Other information is not available.

  • Bangladesh Meteorological Department
  • Banglapedia[2]
8. June, 1822 (Actual date N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm with a core of hurricane winds Coast: The cyclone crossed the coast of Backerganj (Barisal), Sarkar Bala.

Loss and damage: People killed = 50,000.

Cattle killed = 100,000.

Storm wave swept away the collectorate records. Other information is not available.

  • Journal of Asiatic SOC. of Bengal, Vol. 46, Part II, pp 332- by H.F. Blandford
  • Buist's 1st catalogue Trans. Bombay Geo. Soc. Vol. XII. Appendix A.
  • Sailors Horn Book for the law of storms. Appendix A. - by Henry Piddington.
9. June 2, 1823 Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
10. June 8, 1824 Heavy Storm (Severe Cyclonic Storm) Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
11. October 31, 1831 Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed Barisal coast (Grazed the Balasore-Orissa coast)

Surge height: 2.12-4.55 m (7–15 ft)

Loss and damage: People killed = 22,000 (along the coast of India and Bengal)

Cattle killed > 50,000

Other information is not available.

  • Bangladesh Meteorological Department.
  • Bengal District Gazetteer (Balasore)- by L.S.S. O'Malley, ICS
12. June 3–5, 1839 Cyclonic Storm Coast: Crossed Head Bay (Bengal coast)

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
13. September 19–21, 1839 Cyclonic Storm Coast: The storm passed north across Sundarbans coast between Calcutta and Barisal.

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
14. May 11, 1844 Cyclonic Storm (Gale) Coast: Crossed Noakhali and Chittagong coast.

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
15. May 12–13, 1849 Cyclonic Storm (Gale) Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
16. April 23–28, 1850 Cyclonic Storm Formation: Formed over West Nicobars.

Coast: It moved north to Bengal from West Nicobars.

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
17. May 12–15, 1852 Cyclonic Storm Formation: Formed near 15°N.

Coast: It moved northward and crossed the Sundarbans coast; the center passed 39 miles (63 km) east of Calcutta

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
18. May 13–17, 1869 Cyclonic Storm The storm moved northwestward from Cape Negrais to Bengal and crossed the Bengal coast

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
19. June 5–10, 1869 Cyclonic Storm Coast: From the North Bay the cyclone passed over Bengal.

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
20. October 1872 (Date was not available) Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone hit the coast of Cox's Bazar

Other information is not available.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
  • Banglapedia[2]
21. October 29-November 1, 1876

(The Great Backerganj Cyclone of 1876)

Severe Cyclonic Storm with a core of hurricane winds. Coast: The cyclone crossed the coast of Backerganj (present Barisal) near Meghna estuary.

Maximum wind: 220 km/h (119 knots)

Surge height: 3-13.6 m (10–45 ft)

According to Banglapedia, a cyclone with a storm-surge of 12.2 metres (40 ft) hit Meghna River estuary near Chittagong, Barisal, and Noakhali.[2] Casualty: about 200,000. The storm also caused epidemic and famine, and vast property damage.

  • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal, A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979, Prepared for the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development, Washington D.C. 20523 - by F. Henderson.
  • BMD
  • Hurricane Storms and tornadoes- by D.V. Nalivkin, 1982, pp. 68.
  • Journal of Asiatic Soc. Vol. XL VI- by H.F. Blanford pp. 338.
  • Tracks of Storms and Depressions in the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea, 1877–1970, IMD, 1979.
  • Banglapedia[2]
22. 24 October 1897 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Kutubdia island near Chittagong.

Casualty: 14,000. The resulting epidemic of Cholera killed another 18,000

---

23. May 1898 (Date N/A) Tropical cyclone with storm surge Coast:Teknaf

Casualty: unknown

---

24. November 1904 (Date N/A) Cyclonic storm Coast:Sonadia

143 killed and fishing fleet wrecked.

---

25. 16 October 1909 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Khulna

Casualty: 698 people and 70,654 cattle.

---

26. October 1913 (Actual Date N/A) Cyclonic Storm Coast:Muktagachha upazila (Mymensingh District)

A tropical cyclone, having moved inland destroyed villages. Casualty: 500 people.

---

27. 24 September 1917 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Khulna

Casualty: 432 people and 28,029 cattle.

---

28. May 1941 (Date N/A) Cyclonic Storm Coast:Eastern Meghna River estuary

Casualty: unknown.

---

29. October, 1942 (Date N/A) Cyclonic Storm Coast:The Sundarbans

Casualty: unknown.

---

30. 17–19 May 1948 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Deltan between Chittagong and Noakhali

Casualty: approximately 1,200 people and 20,000 cattle.

---

31. 16–19 May 1958 Cyclonic Storm Coast:East and West Meghna River estuary, east of Barisal and Noakhali

Casualty: 870 people and 14,500. Also standing crops were destroyed.

---

32. 21–24 October 1958 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Chittagong

Casualty:Approx. 100,000 families were rendered homeless.

---

33. 9–10 October 1960 Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast:Eastern Meghna River estuary near Noakhali, Bakerganj, Faridpur and Patuakhali.

Maximum Wind:201 km/hour

Maximum Surge:3.05 metres

Casualty: 3,000 people. Other effects: 62,725 houses destroyed. Crops on 94,000 acres (380 km²) of land were destroyed

---

34. 30–31 October 1960 Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast:Chittagong, Noakhali, Bakerganj, Faridpur, Patuakhali and eastern Meghna estuary

Maximum Wind:210 km/h

Surge:4.5-6.1 m

Casualty: about 10,000 people, 27,793 cattle . Losses: 568,161 houses destroyed (including 70% houses in Hatiya). Also, two large ocean-going ships ran aground in the shore, and 5-7 vessels capsized in Karnaphuli River.

---

35. 9 May 1961 Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast:Bagerhat and Khulna

Maximum Wind:161 km/h

Surge height:2.44-3.05 m

Casualty: 11,468 people (mostly in Char Alexander), 25,000 cattle. Damages: The railway tracks between Noakhali and Harinarayanpur were damaged.

---

36. 26–30 October 1962 Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast:Feni

Maximum Wind:161 km/h

Surge height:2.5-3.0 m

Casualty: about 1,000 people, many domestic cattle.

---

37. 28–29 May 1963 Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast:Chittagong, Noakhali, Cox's Bazar and coastal islands of Sandwip, Kutubdia, Hatiya and Maheshkhali.

Maximum Wind:203 km/h (164 km/h at Cox's Bazar)

Surge height:4.3-5.2 m

Casualty: 11,520 people, 32,617 cattle. Damages: 376,332 houses, 4,787 boats, and standing crops.

---

38. 11–12 May 1965 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Barisal and Bakerganj

Maximum Wind:162 km/h

Surge height:3.7 m

Casualty:19,279 people (out of that, 16,456 in Barisal).

---

39. 14–15 December 1965 Cyclonic Storm Coast: near Cox's Bazar and Patuakhali

Maximum Windspeed:210 km/h at Cox's Bazar

Surge height:4.7-6.1 m

Casualty 873 people. Damage: 40,000 salt beds destroyed

---

40. 1 October 1966 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Sandwip, Bakerganj, Khulna, Chittagong, Noakhali and Comilla

Surge height:4.7-9.1 m

Maximum Wind:146 km/h

Total people affected: 1.5 million people. Casualty: 850 people, 65,000 cattle.

---

41. 7 November-13 November: The 1970 Bhola cyclone Severe Cyclonic Storm Coast:entire coast of Bangladesh (then East Pakistan)

Most affected were Chittagong, Barguna, Khepupara, Patuakhali, north of Char Burhanuddin, Char Tazumuddin and south of Maijdi, Haringhata.

The official death toll was 500,000 but the number is likely to be higher. Damages include destruction of approximately 20,000 fishing boats, and also property and crops. Total loss of cattle reached more than one million. More than 400,000 houses and 3,500 educational institutions were destroyed. Maximum Wind:222 km/h

Maximum Surge:10.6 m.

---

42. 5–6 November 1971 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Coastal areas of Chittagong

Casualty:unknown

---

43. 28–30 November 1971 Cyclonic Storm Coast:near the Sundarbans

Wind Speed:97–113 km/h

Surge height:1 m

Effect:Low lying areas of Khulna town inundated

---

44. 6–9 December 1973 Cyclonic Storm Coast:near the Sundarbans

Coastal areas near Patuakhali and nearby islands were submerged under the tidal bore.

---

45. 13–15 August 1974 Cyclonic Storm Coast:Khulna

Maximum Wind:80.5 km/h

Casualty:600 people.

---

46. 24–28 November 1974 Cyclonic Storm Coast:near Cox's Bazar and Chittagong

Maximum Wind:161 km/h

Surge height:2.8-5.2 m

Casualty: 200 people, 1000 cattle. Damages: 2,300 houses destroyed.

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  • Source: SMRC-No.1 - The impact of tropical cyclones on the coastal regions of SAARC countries and their influence in the region, SAARC Meteorological Research Center (SMRC),1998

Historical records

Storms

Cyclones are a product of heat and moisture, which can last up to 24 hours. Low pressure is the main weather associated with cyclones. Cyclones can cause devastating damage and are known to knock out electric and water supplies. It is recommended people have a supply kit ready in case a cyclone hits their area.

A detailed program for storm prevention was outlined by the government following the cyclone of 1991. A Comprehensive Cyclone Preparedness Programme (CPP) is jointly planned, operated, and managed by the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief and the Bangladesh Red Crescent Society; a volunteer force of more than 32,000 are trained to help in warning and evacuation in the coastal areas.[2] Around 2,500 cyclone shelters have been constructed in the coastal regions. The shelters are built on elevated platforms and serve the dual role of schools or community centers during normal weather. In Patenga, Chittagong, the coast has been heavily protected with concrete levees. Also, afforestation has been initiated in the coastal regions to create a green belt.

's satellites. The warnings are usually given in a scale of 10, with 10 being used for the deadliest storms. NOAA and NASA provides storm predictions and early warnings using feeds from [1]

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