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List of ICD-10 codes

ICD-10 is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization (WHO). It codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases.[1]

The code set allows more than 14,400 different codes and permits the tracking of many new diagnoses. The codes can be expanded to over 16,000 codes by using optional sub-classifications. The detail reported by ICD can be further increased, with a simplified multi-axial approach, by using codes meant to be reported in a separate data field.

The WHO provides detailed information about ICD online, and makes available a set of materials online, such as an ICD-10 online browser,[2] ICD-10 Training, ICD-10 online training,[3] ICD-10 online training support,[4] and study guide materials for download.

The International version of ICD should not be confused with national Clinical Modifications of ICD that frequently include much more detail, and sometimes have separate sections for procedures. The US ICD-10 CM, for instance, has some 68,000 codes. The US also has ICD-10 PCS, a procedure code system not used by other countries that contains 76,000 codes.[5]

Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was completed in 1992.[1]

List

The following is a List of ICD-10 codes.[6]

International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision
Chapter Blocks Title
I A00–B99 Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
II C00–D48 Neoplasms
III D50–D89 Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism
IV E00–E90 Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
V F00–F99 Mental and behavioural disorders
VI G00–G99 Diseases of the nervous system
VII H00–H59 Diseases of the eye and adnexa
VIII H60–H95 Diseases of the ear and mastoid process
IX I00–I99 Diseases of the circulatory system
X J00–J99 Diseases of the respiratory system
XI K00–K93 Diseases of the digestive system
XII L00–L99 Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue
XIII M00–M99 Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
XIV N00–N99 Diseases of the genitourinary system
XV O00–O99 Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
XVI P00–P96 Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
XVII Q00–Q99 Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
XVIII R00–R99 Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
XIX S00–T98 Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
XX V01–Y98 External causes of morbidity and mortality
XXI Z00–Z99 Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
XXII U00–U99 Codes for special purposes

Nomenclature

National adoption for clinical use

Some 25 countries use ICD-10 for reimbursement and resource allocation in their health system. A few of them made modifications to ICD to better accommodate this use of ICD-10. The article below makes reference to some of these modifications. The unchanged international version of ICD-10 is used in about 110 countries for cause of death reporting and statistics.

Australia

1 July 1998 Victoria, New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory implemented ICD-10-AM.
1 July 1999 Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia implemented ICD-10-AM.[7]

Canada

Canada introduced ICD-10-CA in 2000.[8]

China

China now using ICD-10 as diagnosis reference and ICD-9 as procedure reference.

France

France introduced a clinical addendum to ICD-10 in 2005. See also website of the ATIH.

Germany

Germany: ICD-10-GM (German Modification)

Korea

A Korean modification has existed since 2008.

Netherlands

The Dutch translation of ICD-10 is ICD10-nl, which was created by the WHO-FIC Netwerk in 1994.online dictionary.

South Africa

1 January 2005 Pretoria, Johannesburg, Cape town

Sweden

The current Swedish translation of ICD-10 was created in 1997. A clinical modification has added more detail and omits codes of the international version in the context of clinical use of ICD:

The codes F64.1 (Dual-role transvestism), F64.2 (Gender identity disorder of childhood), F65.0 (Fetishism), F65.1 (Fetishistic transvestism), F65.5 (Sadomasochism), F65.6 (Multiple disorders of sexual preference) are not used in Sweden since 1 January 2009 according to a decision by the present Director General of The National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden. The code O60.0 (Preterm labor without delivery) is not used in Sweden; instead, since 1 January 2009, the Swedish extension codes to O47 (False labor) are recommended for use.

Thailand

A Thai modification exists since 2007.

Now Ministry of Public Health have **ICD 10 TM**

United States

The deadline for the United States to begin using Clinical Modification ICD-10-CM for diagnosis coding and Procedure Coding System ICD-10-PCS for inpatient hospital procedure coding is currently October 1, 2014.[10] The deadline was previously October 1, 2013.[11][12] All HIPAA "covered entities" must make the change; a pre-requisite to ICD-10 is the adoption of EDI Version 5010 by January 1, 2012.[13] Enforcement of 5010 transition by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), however, was postponed by CMS until March 31, 2012, with the federal agency citing numerous factors, including slow software upgrades.[14] The implementation of ICD-10 has been subject to previous delays. In January 2009, the date was pushed back by two years, to October 1, 2013 rather than a prior proposal of October 1, 2011.[15]

Even though the deadline for ICD-10 has been pushed back repeatedly, CMS recommends that medical practices take several years to prepare for implementation of the new code set.[16] The basic structure of the ICD-10 code is the following: Characters 1-3 (the category of disease); 4 (etiology of disease); 5 (body part affected), 6 (severity of illness) and 7 (placeholder for extension of the code to increase specificity) .[17] Not only must new software be installed and tested, but medical practices must provide training for physicians, staff members, and administrators. They will also need to develop new practice policies and guidelines, and update paperwork and forms. Practices should also create crosswalks that will convert their most frequently used ICD-9 codes to the ICD-10 equivalents.

U.A.E (Dubai)

Dubai Health Authority (DHA) introduced ICD-10 in 2012.

Language versions

Language versions should not be confused with clinical versions. ICD has been translated into 42 languages.

See also

References

Template:Medical classificationde:ICD-10

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