World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Nova Scotia

Article Id: WHEBN0028481043
Reproduction Date:

Title: List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Nova Scotia  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: National Historic Sites of Canada, Cartier-Brébeuf National Historic Site, Ukrainian Labour Temple, Joseph Schneider Haus, Inuksuk Point
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Nova Scotia

This is a list of National Historic Sites of Canada (French: Lieux historiques nationaux du Canada) in the province of Nova Scotia. There are 87 National Historic Sites designated in Nova Scotia, of which 26 are administered by Parks Canada.[1][2]

This list uses names designated by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which may differ from other names for these sites.

National Historic Sites

Site[1] Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Acacia Grove / Prescott House [3] 1809 (completed) 1969 Starr's Point
A house on an extensive property in the Georgian architecture in Canada View of Acacia Grove / Prescott House and gardens
Admiralty House [4] 1819 (completed) 1978 Halifax
An austere two-storey stone mansion set within the Stadacona site of CFB Halifax which served as the home of Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Navy’s North American station from 1819 until 1904 Front facade of Admiralty House
Africville [5] 1964 (relocation commenced) 1996 Halifax
A Black Nova Scotian community cleared by the municipality in the 1960s in the name of urban renewal; the community was representative of Black settlements in the province and became an enduring symbol of the need for vigilance in defense of Black communities and institutions The Africville Monument in Seaview Park with the A Murray MacKay Bridge in the background
Akins House [6] 1815 (c.) (completed) 1965 Halifax
A one-and-a-half-storey wood-shingled house originally built for Thomas Beamish Akins, surviving virtually in its original condition; one of the few remaining early 19th-century houses in Halifax and one of the oldest houses in the city
Alexander Graham Bell [7] 1954 (museum completed) 1952 Baddeck
A museum containing Alexander Graham Bell memorabilia, located on a 10-hectare (25-acre) property overlooking Bras d'Or Lake and Bell's summer estate at Beinn Bhreagh Visitor Centre at the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site of Canada
Annapolis County Court House [8] 1837 (completed) 1991 Annapolis Royal
One of the oldest court houses in Canada still in original use, and a noted example of Palladian architecture in this country
Annapolis Royal Historic District [9] 1605 (established) 1994 Annapolis Royal
A historic core containing commercial, military, and residential buildings from the 18th to early 20th centuries, located at the centre of the original 17th-century Acadian settlement; the site of several pivotal events during the early years of the colonisation of Canada Samuel de Champlain's diagram of Port Royal circa 1612
Antigonish County Court House [10] 1855 (completed) 1981 Antigonish
A wood-frame building with Greek Revival front facade and a stone jail attached at the rear; one of the best examples in Nova Scotia of mid-19th century Maritime court houses, which were typically simple frame buildings with classicized ornamental details
Argyle Township Court House and Jail [11] 1805 (completed) 2005 Tusket
A two-storey wooden building constructed in the colonial meeting house style, now serving as a museum; the oldest known surviving combined court house and jail Front facade of the white wooden Argyle Township Court House and Jail
Beaubassin [12] 1672 (established) 2005 Fort Lawrence
An archaeological site with remains from a major Acadian settlement that played a pivotal role in the 17th and 18th century struggle between the British and French for the region; the site also contains the Fort Lawrence NHSC Cairn dedicated to the families of Beaubassin
Bedford Petroglyphs [13] 1994 Halifax
Spiritually significant petroglyph site
Black-Binney House [14] 1819 (completed) 1965 Halifax
A house reflective of the Palladian-inspired residences common during the late 18th and early 19th centuries in Eastern Canada; notable residents include John Black, James Boyle Uniacke and Hibbert Binney
Bloody Creek [15] 1711, 1757 (battles) 1930 Bridgetown
Site of two battles, in 1711 and 1757, between British forces and allied French and Aboriginal forces over control of Acadia; a cairn marks the site of the 1757 battle Cairn at the site of the Battle of Bloody Creek
Canso Islands [16] 1700s (commencement of long-term European occupation) 1925 Canso
A group of islands which served as an important fishing base for the French in the 16th century and the British during the 18th century; the staging point for the 1745 expedition led by William Pepperrell and Peter Warren against Louisbourg
Cast Iron Façade / Coomb's Old English Shoe Store [17] 1860 (completed) 1981 Halifax
A mid-19th-century commercial building with a cast-iron facade; one of the first cast-iron-front structures in Canada and the only building in Halifax known to have a facade composed entirely of cast iron
Chapel Island [18] 2003 Chapel Island First Nation
An island which for centuries has been an important gathering place, location for government and site of spiritual significance for the Mi'kmaq people Church and other buildings on Chapel Island seen from a distance
Chapman House [19] 1780 (completed) 1968 Fort Lawrence
A two-storey, red-brick Maritimes farmhouses
Charles Fort [20] 1629 (established) 1951 Annapolis Royal
The site of William Alexander's former settlement, intended to establish the colony of "Nova Scotia"; occupied by Scottish colonists for 3 years, when the territory was restored to France
Covenanters' Church [21] 1811 (completed) 1976 Grand-Pré
A simple frame and rectangular Presbyterian church, representative of the 18th-century New England meeting house style; also a component of the Grand-Pré Rural Historic District NHSC Covenanter Church, October 27, 2012
D'Anville's Encampment [22] 1746 (encampment) 1925 Halifax
The site where Duc d’Anville's forces camped along the shore on a failed expedition from France to recover Acadia The Duc d'Anville Monument in Halifax
Debert Palaeo-Indian Site [23] 1974 Debert
The oldest archaeological site in Nova Scotia, and one of the most important Paleo-Indian sites in the province, with artifacts dating from 10,600 to 13,000 years ago
Fernwood [24] 1860 (c.) (completed) 1990 Halifax
A house on a large landscaped property; a noted example of a Gothic Revival villa in Canada Fernwood
Fort Anne [25] 1629 (established) 1920 Annapolis Royal
The remains of a fort that played an important role in early European colonization, settlement and government in Acadia and Nova Scotia, and in the struggle between Britain and France for the area Canons at Fort Anne overooking the water
Fort Edward [26] 1750 (established) 1920 Windsor
A fort that played an important role in the Seven Years' War, the expulsion of the Acadians, and the defence of Canada during the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812; today comprises a wooden blockhouse and remnants of buildings and landscape features from the 18th-century fortifications. The blockhouse at Fort Edward
Fort Lawrence [27] 1750 (established) 1923 Fort Lawrence
The archaeological remains of a fort erected in 1750 by the British to defend the Isthmus of Chignecto and abandoned in 1755 after the capture of Fort Beauséjour Fort Lawrence memorial cairn erected by HSMB
Fort McNab [28] 1892 (completed) 1965 Halifax
The remnants of defensive works constructed to defend Halifax when it was one of the principal naval stations of the British Empire; reflective of significant changes in defence technology in the late 19th century Ruins of Fort McNab
Fort St. Louis [29] 1623 (established) 1931 Port La Tour
During the Scottish occupation of Port Royal from 1629 to 1632, this fort was France's only foothold in Acadia
Fort Sainte Marie de Grace [30] 1632 (established) 1924 LaHave, Nova Scotia
The site where Isaac de Razilly built a fort, a settlement and the capital of the colony of Acadia after the Treaty of St. Germain-en-Laye returned the colony to France in 1632
Fortress of Louisbourg [31] 1713 (establishment) 1920 Louisbourg
The largest reconstructed 18th-century French fortified town in North America; the fortress played a key role in the struggle between the French and British empires between 1713 and 1768 Fortress of Louisbourg seen from the water
[32] 1749 (first defence works) 1965 Halifax
An island located in the middle of one of the finest natural harbours in the world; played a key role in the "Halifax Defence Complex" and protected one of the British Empire's principal naval stations during the 18th and 19th centuries
Government House [33] 1805 (completed) 1982 Halifax
Government House has served as an official residence for more than 175 years and is one of the oldest official residences in Canada Government House seen from the gates
Grand-Pré [34] 1682 (first settlement of Acadians) 1982 Grand-Pré
A centre of Acadian settlement and culture from 1682 until 1775; the site served as the British headquarters for the 1755–1763 deportation of the Acadians from Nova Scotia The church of Grand-Pré and the statue of Évangéline
Grand-Pré Rural Historic District [35] 1682 (first settlement of Acadians) 1995 Kings County
A rural cultural landscape surrounding the villages of Grand-Pré and Hortonville featuring one of the oldest land occupation and use patterns of European origin in Canada; representative of the adaptation of the first Acadian settlers to the conditions of North America
Granville Block [36] 1860-1904 (completion dates) 2007 Halifax
A complex of 19 buildings, primarily four to five storeys in height, constructed in the years after a large fire in 1859; the rehabilitation of this block in the 1970s was an early success of the heritage preservation movement, and the block now accommodates NSCAD University View of the facades of the Granville Block from the street
Grassy Island Fort [37] 1720 (first small redoubt built by the British) 1962 Canso
The remains of early 18th-century British fortifications (a 1720 redoubt, 1723-24 fort, and a 1745 blockhouse); part of the larger Canso Islands NHSC Green terrain of Grassy Island near the water
Halifax Citadel [38] 1749 (established), 1828 (present fort commenced) 1935 Halifax
A stone fortress built to defend what was one of the British Empire's four principal naval stations during the 18th and 19th centuries; a key element of the unique complex of shore defences in Halifax Town clock at the Halifax Citadel
Halifax City Hall [39] 1890 (completed) 1984 Halifax
A three-storey municipal building with a seven-storey clock tower, prominently located on the Grand Parade; symbolic of the city halls built in the l9th century in medium-sized Canadian cities Front facade of the Halifax City Hall
Halifax Court House [40] 1860 (completed) 1969 Halifax
An imposing sandstone court house built in the neoclassical style with Italianate detailing; representative of the judicial system of Nova Scotia Front facade of the Halifax Court House
Halifax Drill Hall [41] 1899 (completed) 1989 Halifax
Richardsonian Romanesque drill hall designed by Thomas Fuller; representative of the second evolutionary stage in drill hall construction in Canada (1872–1895) Detail of the Cornwallis Street facade, Halifax Armoury
Halifax Dockyard [42] 1758 (established) 1923 Halifax
Created in 1758 under the supervision of Captain James Cook, it was the earliest Royal Navy dockyard in North America; still in use by the Royal Canadian Navy HMCS Fredericton (FFH 337) docked at the CFB Halifax dockyard in 2005
Halifax Public Gardens [43] 1874 (established) 1983 Halifax
A rare surviving example of a Victorian public garden in Canada; it continues to serve as a public park, with the original landscape design and planting traditions remaining essentially intact Front gates for the Halifax Public Gardens
Halifax Waterfront Buildings [44] 1815 to 1905 (constructed) 1963 Halifax
A group of restored stone and wooden warehouses on the waterfront and adaptively reused for offices, shops and restaurants; the most significant pre-Confederation complex of maritime commercial buildings in Canada
Halifax WWII Coastal Defences [45] 1939-45 (period of service) 1994 Halifax
Halifax was Canada's most heavily defended port during the Second World War and served as the main Allied convoy assembly point during the Battle of the Atlantic The Sailor's Memorial in Halifax which features a plaque for the Halifax WWII Coastal Defences National Historic Site
Henry House [46] 1834 (completed) 1969 Halifax
A two-and-a-half-storey stone house representative of the style of residences built for the elite in early 19th-century British North America; the home of William Alexander Henry, a Father of Confederation and justice of the Supreme Court of Canada 1879 photograph of Henry House with a carriage out front
HMCS Sackville [47] 1941 (entered service) 1988 Halifax
One of the last Flower-class corvettes known to exist, a class of ship which played a key role in the Battle of the Atlantic HMCS Sackville in Halifax Harbour
Hydrostone District [48] 1917 (established) 1993 Halifax
An excellent example of an English-style garden suburb in Canada; the country's first public housing project, planned by Thomas Adams and designed by Ross and Macdonald Shops and streetscape in Halifax's Hydrostone district
Jonathan McCully House [49] 1857 (completed) 1975 Halifax
Italianate house which served as the residence of Jonathan McCully, a Father of Confederation, between 1863 and 1877
Kejimkujik [50] 1994 Kejimkujik National Park
A cultural landscape 404 square kilometres (156 sq mi) in size, in which petroglyph sites, habitation sites, fishing and hunting sites, travel routes and burial grounds attest to Mi’kmaq occupancy of this area for thousands of years
King's College [51] 1789 (established) 1923 Windsor
The first university to be established in the Dominions of the British Empire; the original site of the oldest university in what was to become Canada (campus now located in Halifax) The former Convocation Hall of King's College in Windsor
Knaut-Rhuland House [52] 1793 (completed) 2002 Lunenburg
A clapboard wood-frame house with neoclassical detailing; an early example of British classicism in Canada, a style which flourished in the country in the years that followed Front facade of the Knaut-Rhuland House
Ladies' Seminary [53] 1878 (completed) 1997 Wolfville
A Second Empire style-building located on the Acadia University campus; constructed in 1878 as a home for women attending the university, it is Canada's oldest facility associated with the higher education of women
Little Dutch (Deutsch) Church [54] 1752 (land set aside for German community) 1997 Halifax
A small wooden church surrounded by an 18th-century burying ground and a stone wall; the oldest known surviving church in Canada associated with the German Canadian community Little Dutch (Deutsch) Church with tombstones in the foreground
Liverpool Town Hall [55] 1902 (completed) 1984 Queens
A former town hall now serving as a museum and theatre; its restrained classical detailing and wooden construction are rare for town halls of this scale constructed in the 20th century in Canada Front facade of the Liverpool Town Hall with war memorial and Canadian flag in the foreground
Lunenburg Academy [56] 1895 (completed) 1983 Lunenburg
A highly visible Second Empire style-building located atop Gallows Hill; a rare surviving academy building, representative of a significant evolution in Nova Scotia's education system in the 19th century when publicly funded county academies were introduced to provide high-quality secondary education Lunenburg Academy
Marconi National Historic Site [57] 1902 (first transatlantic radio transmission) 1939 Glace Bay
The isolated site where Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic radio telegraph message; comprises the remains of two telegraph towers that once supported Marconi’s antennae and the foundation walls of his receiving room and powerhouse
Marconi Wireless Station [58] 1905 (established) 1983 Cape Breton Regional Municipality
A 350-hectare (860-acre) site containing the foundations of aerial towers and three abandoned buildings; location of the wireless station which, along with a sister station in Ireland, was the first to provide regular public intercontinental radio service commencing in 1908 Old postcard of radio towers at Marconi site
Melanson Settlement [59] 1664 (established) 1987 Lower Granville
The remains (a dyked terrace and subsurface archaeological resources) of a pre-expulsion Acadian village in the salt marshes of the Annapolis River; representative of Acadian settlements and their unique form of agriculture along the Dauphin (now Annapolis) River
Nova Scotia Coal Fields (Sydney) [60] 1998 Sydney
Surviving clusters of in situ resources associated with the fields and the coal industry
Nova Scotia Coal Fields (Stellarton) [61] 1998 Stellarton
Surviving clusters of in situ resources associated with the fields and the coal industry
Old Barrington Meeting House [62] 1765 (completed) 1966 Barrington Head
Wood frame building erected by settlers from New England; one of the oldest surviving buildings in English-speaking Canada, and a good example of a New England-style colonial meeting house
Old Burying Ground [63] 1749 (establishment) 1991 Halifax
A 0.91-hectare (2.2-acre) early graveyard surrounded by a stone wall and decorative iron fence; a unique concentration of gravestone art, symbolizing the cultural traditions of early British North America Crimean War Monument at the Old Burying Ground
Old Town Lunenburg Historic District [64] 1753 (established) 1991 Lunenburg
The core area of the town and a well-preserved example of 18th-century colonization and settlement patterns; a World Heritage Site, and one of the earliest and most intact British model plans in Canada
Pictou Academy [65] 1818 (established) 1937 Pictou
The original site of the Pictou Academy, today marked by a cairn; founded by Thomas McCulloch, the Academy introduced nonsectarian education to the Maritimes
Pictou Railway Station (Intercolonial) [66] 1904 (completed) 1976 Pictou
An eclectic former the Maritimes and Central Canada Pictou Railway Station
Pier 21 [67] 1928 (completed), 1944 (rebuilt) 1997 Halifax
An ocean passenger terminal which witnessed the massive stream of post Second World War immigration to Canada from Canada, including the arrival of war brides; the last intact example of its type, and the embodiment of early 20th-century Canadian immigration Front facade of Pier 21
Port-Royal [68] 1605 (established), 1939 (reconstruction) 1923 Port Royal
A historic reconstruction of an early 17th-century French fort; symbolic of the legacy of the local Acadian and Mi'kmaq peoples in 1605-1613, and a milestone in the 20th-century Canadian heritage movement Courtyard at Habitation at Port-Royal
Prince of Wales Tower [69] 1799 (completed) 1943 Halifax
A large martello tower which played a significant role in the development of Halifax as one of the four principal naval stations of the British Empire during the 18th and 19th centuries Prince of Wales martello tower with park bench in foreground
Province House [70] 1819 (completed) 1993 Halifax
The longest serving legislative building in Canada and one of the best examples of Palladian architecture in the country; the birthplace of responsible government and freedom of the press in Canada Province House
Royal Battery [71] 1728 (completed) 1952 Louisbourg
An archaeological site where the outline of the battery’s ditch, glacis and tower mounds are still evident; built by the French as part of the defences of Louisbourg harbour, the battery played a significant role in the 1745 and 1758 sieges of Louisbourg
S.S. Acadia [72] 1913 (launched) 1976 Halifax
A steel, purpose-built hydrographic vessel launched in 1913 and now berthed at a Halifax wharf; a pioneering oceanography research ship which took a lead role in charting Hudson Bay The S.S. Acadia anchored in Halifax Harbour
Sainte-Anne / Port Dauphin [73] 1629 (established) 1929 Englishtown
Founded by Captain Charles Daniel as a Jesuit mission and later a naval base, its importance declined with the choice of Louisbourg as the capital in 1719
Sinclair Inn / Farmer's Hotel [74] 1710 (earliest elements) 1983 Annapolis Royal
A wooden former hotel which evolved with the amalgamation of at least two buildings, one dating from the Acadian era; the building stands as a composite of three centuries of materials, construction techniques and architectural styles
Sir Frederick Borden Residence [75] 1864 (completed), 1902 (renovated in Queen Anne style) 1990 Canning
Former home of Frederick William Borden, located in a park-like setting; a good example of Queen Anne style architecture in domestic buildings
Springhill Coal Mining [76] 1873 (commencement of coal mining) 1998 Springhill
A former coalfield with surface and underground mining features that are unique to Nova Scotia; at one time one of Canada’s most commercially important coalfields Entrance to a Springhill mine shaft
[77] 1812 (completed) 1983 Halifax
A cylindrical wooden church associated with the early history of Halifax; an excellent example of Palladian architecture in Canada
St. John's Anglican Church [78] 1763 (completed) 1994 Lunenburg
A Carpenter Gothic church in the heart of Lunenburg; played an important role in the establishment of British authority and of the Church of England in 18th-century Nova Scotia Alt=Front facade of St. John's Anglican Church as seen from across the church grounds
St. Mary's Basilica [79] 1820 (established) 1997 Halifax
A large Gothic Revival church associated with individuals and events which played a central role in the emancipation of Roman Catholics in Nova Scotia and in Canada St. Mary's Basilica
St. Paul's Anglican Church [80] 1750 (completed) 1981 Halifax
A small wooden church with a gable roof and central steeple; the first building erected in Canada in the Palladian style, and the first church outside Great Britain to be designated an Anglican cathedral St. Paul's Anglican Church
St. Peter's [81] 1630 (established) 1929 St. Peter's
An archaeological site with resources related to 17th- and 18th- century Mi’kmaq and Acadian communities; the site of Fort Saint-Pierre, a 17th-century fortified trading post, and Port-Toulouse, a French community established in 1713
St. Peters Canal [82] 1869 (completed) 1929 Halifax
A canal that connects Bras d'Or Lake with St. Peter’s Bay on the Atlantic Ocean; a cultural landscape associated with the construction and operation of the canal St. Peters Canal seen from nearby hillside
Sydney WWII Coastal Defences [83] 1939-45 1994 Sydney
As a safe port protected by seven coastal gun batteries during the Second World War, Sydney played an important role in the efforts of the RCN and the RCAF to keep open the vital North Atlantic supply routes
Thinkers' Lodge [84] 1957 (conference) 2008 Pugwash
The birthplace at the height of the nuclear disarmament and world peace Thinkers' Lodge
Trinity Anglican Church [85] 1878 (completed) 1990 Digby
A good example of the work of architect Stephen C. Earle and of a church in Canada built in the American Ecclesiological Gothic Revival tradition
Truro Post Office [86] 1886 (completed) 1983 Truro
A good example of the post offices erected by the federal Department of Public Works in smaller urban centres throughout the country during Thomas Fuller’s term as Dominion Chief Architect
Wolfe's Landing [87] 1758 (landing) 1929 Cape Breton Regional Municipality
During the Seven Years' War, the site where British forces in James Wolfe's brigade launched their successful attack on the French forces at the Fortress of Lousibourg
York Redoubt [88] 1793 (established) 1962 Halifax
Major seaward defences of Halifax Harbour from the American Revolutionary War until the Second World War; illustrates the historical evolution of the Halifax Harbour defence system WWII observation posts on shoreline at York Redoubt

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Nova Scotia". Directory of Federal Heritage Designations.  
  2. ^ Nova Scotia, National Historic Sites of Canada - administered by Parks Canada
  3. ^ Acacia Grove / Prescott House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 August 2012.
  4. ^ Admiralty House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 August 2012.
  5. ^ Africville. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  6. ^ Akins House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  7. ^ Alexander Graham Bell. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  8. ^ Annapolis County Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  9. ^ Annapolis Royal Historic District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  10. ^ Antigonish County Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  11. ^ Argyle Township Court House and Jail. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  12. ^ Beaubassin. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  13. ^ Bedford Petroglyphs. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  14. ^ Black-Binney House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  15. ^ Bloody Creek. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  16. ^ Canso Islands. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  17. ^ Cast Iron Façade / Coomb's Old English Shoe Store. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  18. ^ Chapel Island. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  19. ^ Chapman House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  20. ^ Charles Fort. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  21. ^ Covenanters' Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  22. ^ D'Anville's Encampment. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 30 September 2012.
  23. ^ Debert Palaeo-Indian Site. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 30 September 2012.
  24. ^ Fernwood. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 30 September 2012.
  25. ^ Fort Anne. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 30 September 2012.
  26. ^ Fort Edward. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 30 September 2012.
  27. ^ Fort Lawrence. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  28. ^ Fort McNab. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  29. ^ Fort St. Louis. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  30. ^ Fort Sainte Marie de Grace. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  31. ^ Fortress of Louisbourg. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  32. ^ Georges Island. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  33. ^ Government House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  34. ^ Grand-Pré. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  35. ^ Grand-Pré Rural Historic District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  36. ^ Granville Block. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 February 2013.
  37. ^ Grassy Island Fort. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 February 2013.
  38. ^ Halifax Citadel. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  39. ^ Halifax City Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  40. ^ Halifax Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  41. ^ Halifax Armoury. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  42. ^ Halifax Dockyard. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  43. ^ Halifax Public Gardens. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  44. ^ Halifax Waterfront Buildings. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  45. ^ Halifax WWII Coastal Defences. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  46. ^ Henry House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  47. ^ HMCS Sackville. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  48. ^ Hydrostone District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  49. ^ Jonathan McCully House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  50. ^ Kejimkujik. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  51. ^ King's College. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  52. ^ Knaut-Rhuland House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  53. ^ Ladies' Seminary. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  54. ^ Little Dutch (Deutsch) Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  55. ^ Liverpool Town Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  56. ^ Lunenburg Academy. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  57. ^ Marconi National Historic Site of Canada. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  58. ^ Marconi Wireless Station. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  59. ^ Melanson Settlement. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  60. ^ Nova Scotia Coal Fields (Sydney). Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  61. ^ Nova Scotia Coal Fields (Stellarton). Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  62. ^ Old Barrington Meeting House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  63. ^ Old Burying Ground. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  64. ^ Old Town Lunenburg Historic District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  65. ^ Pictou Academy. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  66. ^ Pictou Railway Station (Intercolonial). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  67. ^ Pier 21. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  68. ^ Port-Royal. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  69. ^ Prince of Wales Tower. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  70. ^ Province House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  71. ^ Royal Battery. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  72. ^ S.S. Acadia. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  73. ^ Sainte-Anne / Port Dauphin. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  74. ^ Sinclair Inn / Farmer's Hotel. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  75. ^ Sir Frederick Borden Residence. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  76. ^ Springhill Coal Mining. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  77. ^ St. George's Anglican Church / Round Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  78. ^ St. John's Anglican Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  79. ^ St. Mary's Basilica. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  80. ^ St. Paul's Anglican Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 16 April 2013.
  81. ^ St. Peter's. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 16 April 2013.
  82. ^ St. Peters Canal. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 16 April 2013.
  83. ^ Sydney WWII Coastal Defences. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 16 April 2013.
  84. ^ Thinkers' Lodge. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
  85. ^ Trinity Anglican Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
  86. ^ Truro Post Office. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
  87. ^ Wolfe's Landing. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
  88. ^ York Redoubt. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.