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List of Olympic venues in judo

 

List of Olympic venues in judo

Nippon Budoka Hall hosted the first Olympic judo events at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.
The Georgia World Congress Center hosted the judo competitions for the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.
For the Summer Olympics, there are 15 venues that have been or will be used for judo.
Games Venue Other sports hosted at venue for those games Capacity Ref.
1964 Tokyo Nippon Budoka Hall None 14,100 [1][2]
1972 Munich Basketballhalle Basketball 6,635 [3]
Boxhalle (final) Boxing 7,360 [4]
Messegelände, Judo- und Ringerhalle Wrestling 5,750 [5]
1976 Montreal Olympic Velodrome Cycling (track) 2,600 [6]
1980 Moscow Sports Palace Gymnastics 11,500 [7]
1984 Los Angeles Eagle's Nest Arena None 4,200 [8]
1988 Seoul Jangchung Gymnasium Taekwondo (demonstration) 7,000 [9]
1992 Barcelona Palau Blaugrana Roller hockey (demonstration final), Taekwondo (demonstration) 6,400 [10]
1996 Atlanta Georgia World Congress Center Fencing, Handball, Modern pentathlon (fencing, shooting), Table tennis, Weightlifting, Wrestling 3,900 (fencing)
7,300 (handball)
7,300 (judo)
4,700 (table tennis)
5,000 (weightlifting)
7,300 (wrestling)
[11][12]
2000 Sydney Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre Boxing, Fencing, Weightlifting, Wrestling 7,500 (weightlifting),
9,000 (judo & wrestling),
10,000 (boxing & fencing)
[13]
2004 Athens Ano Liosia Olympic Hall Wrestling 10,000 [14]
2008 Beijing Beijing Science and Technology University Gymnasium Judo 8,024 [15]
2012 London ExCeL Boxing, Fencing, Table tennis, Taekwondo, Weightlifting, Wrestling Not listed. [16]
2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Training Center – Arena 2 Taekwondo 10,000 [17]

References

  1. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 115. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  2. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 128–30. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  3. ^ 1972 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. pp. 201-2. Accessed 8 November 2010.
  4. ^ 1972 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. pp. 193-4. Accessed 8 November 2010.
  5. ^ 1972 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. pp. 197-201. Accessed 8 November 2010.
  6. ^ 1976 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 76-85. Accessed 14 November 2010.
  7. ^ 1980 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 58-60. Accessed 18 November 2010.
  8. ^ 1984 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 137-9. Accessed 24 November 2010.
  9. ^ 1988 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 202. Accessed 1 December 2010.
  10. ^ 1992 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 217-20. Accessed 6 December 2010.
  11. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 540-1. Accessed 9 December 2010.
  12. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 3. pp. 448, 455, 457, 459-60, 462, 466. Accessed 9 December 2010.
  13. ^ 2000 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 383. Accessed 17 December 2010.
  14. ^ 2004 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 357-8, 433. Accessed 24 December 2010.
  15. ^ "Beijing Science and Technology University". Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. Retrieved 2008-08-10. 
  16. ^ London2012.com profile of ExCeL. Accessed 30 December 2010.
  17. ^ "OTC - Hall 2", Rio de Janeiro 2016 Candidate File (PDF) 2, (BOC), February 16, 2009, pp. 40–43, retrieved December 2, 2009. 
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