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List of Orthodox churches

Orthodox Churches (those that use the word "Orthodox" in the name) belong mainly to two groups, Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy.[1] Apart from these two groups, some other quite unconnected Churches in the West also call themselves Orthodox. An example is the Celtic Orthodox Church.

Contents

  • Eastern Orthodoxy 1
    • Eastern Orthodox Churches (in full communion) 1.1
    • Eastern Orthodox Churches (not in communion) 1.2
      • Traditionalist schisms 1.2.1
      • Nationalist schisms 1.2.2
  • Oriental Orthodoxy 2
  • Map of Orthodox Churches in Full Communion (Europe and Middle East) 3
    • Eastern Orthodox Churches in Full Communion 3.1
    • Oriental Orthodox Churches in Full Communion 3.2
    • Eastern Orthodox Churches in Full Communion 3.3
    • Oriental Orthodox Churches in Full Communion 3.4
  • Others 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Eastern Orthodoxy

Eastern Orthodox Churches (in full communion)

Eastern Orthodox Churches (not in communion)

Traditionalist schisms

Nationalist schisms

Oriental Orthodoxy

Map of Orthodox Churches in Full Communion (Europe and Middle East)

Map of the churches in the Orthodox Communion in Europe and parts of the Middle East. Striped areas indicate where territories overlap each other.

Eastern Orthodox Churches in Full Communion

  Patriarchy of Constantinople
  Patriarchy of Alexandria
  Patriarchy of Antioch
  Patriarchy of Jerusalem
  Patriarchy of Moscow and all Russia
  Patriarchy of Peć and the Serbian Lands
  Patriarchy of Romania
  Patriarchy of Bulgaria
  Patriarchy of Georgia
  Church of Cyprus
  Orthodox Church of Greece
  Polish Orthodox Church
  Albanian Orthodox Church
  Czech and Slovak Orthodox Church

Oriental Orthodox Churches in Full Communion

  Armenian Apostolic Church
  Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria
  Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch

Others

Some small churches in the West use the word "Orthodox" in their titles but are quite distinct from these two families of churches. Examples include the African Orthodox Church and the Celtic Orthodox Church.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Oriental Orthodox churches, along with those of the Byzantine tradition or Eastern Orthodox, belong to the larger family of the Orthodox churches. The two groups are not in communion with each other" (Orthodox churches (Oriental)

External links

  • John Binns: An Introduction to the Christian Orthodox Churches (Cambridge University Press, 2005 ISBN 978-0-521-66738-8)
  • http://www.orthodox-christianity.org
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