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List of Presidents of Venezuela

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Title: List of Presidents of Venezuela  
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Subject: In the news/Candidates/September 2009, September 2009, Hugo Chávez, Venezuelan recall referendum, 2004, Carlos Andrés Pérez
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List of Presidents of Venezuela

President of Venezuela
Standard of the President
Incumbent
Nicolás Maduro

since April 19, 2013
Residence La Casona
Seat Miraflores Palace
Term length Six years, renewable indefinitely
Inaugural holder José Antonio Páez
Formation January 13, 1830
Deputy Vice President of Venezuela
Website presidencia.gob.ve
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Venezuela

The President of Venezuela (Spanish: Presidente de Venezuela) is both the head of state and head of government of Venezuela. The current presidential term is for six years with the constitutionally guaranteed recourse of holding a popular recall referendum any time within the last three years of a presidential term. A 2009 referendum removed the previous restrictions which limited the President to two terms.[1] The current president of Venezuela is Nicolás Maduro, since April 19, 2013.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Before 1830 1.1
    • After 1830 1.2
  • Presidents of Venezuela since independence (1830–present) 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

Before 1830

The presidential designation encompasses only those persons who were sworn into office as President of Venezuela following Venezuela's declaration of independence from Spanish colonial rule, which took effect on July 5, 1811. The first president, taking office on July 5, 1811, was actually the president of a triumvirate of the first established Republic of Venezuela that rotated the presidency weekly. The person serving as president during the week of July 5 was one of the three signatories of the Declaration of Independence: Cristóbal Mendoza. Mendoza shared the triumvirate with Juan Escalona and Baltasar Padrón. A second triumvirate followed on April 3, 1812 whose members were Francisco Espejo, Fernando Toro and Francisco Javier Ustariz.[2][3]

Owing to the profound confusion of the Venezuelan War of Independence and the period of Gran Colombia over what is now Venezuela, this page has gaps between 1813 and 1819. For this period in time, historians refer to the Republic of Venezuela as the Second Republic of Venezuela (1813–1814) and the Third Republic of Venezuela (1817–1819) as Simon Bolivar twice reestablished the republic. The Congress of Angostura appointed Simón Bolívar "Jefe Supremo de la República de Venezuela" (Supreme Commander of the Republic of Venezuela) from 1819 until 1830.

After 1830

In 1830, José Antonio Páez declared Venezuela independent from Gran Colombia and became president, taking office on January 13, 1830. Although he was not the first president of Venezuela (having in mind Cristóbal Mendoza in 1811), he was the first head of state of independent Venezuela, after the dissolution of Gran Colombia.

Presidents of Venezuela since independence (1830–present)

The list below includes interim "caretaker" as well as regular serving presidents, and democratically installed presidents as well as those installed by other means (e.g.; Marcos Pérez Jiménez).

      Conservative Party       Liberal Party       Independent       Military government       Democratic Action       COPEI       National Convergence

      Fifth Republic Movement/United Socialist Party
Picture President Dates in office Form of entry Occupation
José Antonio Páez January 13, 1830 – January 20, 1835 Indirect elections Military general
Andrés Narvarte January 20, 1835 – February 9, 1835 Acting president Lawyer / politician
José María Vargas February 9, 1835 – July 9, 1835 Indirect elections Physician
José María Carreño July 27, 1835 – August 20, 1835 Acting president Military general
José María Vargas August 20, 1835 – April 24, 1836 Restoration Physician
Andrés Narvarte April 24, 1836 – January 20, 1837 Interim caretaker Lawyer / politician
José María Carreño January 20, 1837 – March 11, 1837 Interim caretaker Military general
Carlos Soublette March 11, 1837 – February 1, 1839 Interim caretaker Military general
José Antonio Páez February 1, 1839 – January 28, 1843 Indirect elections Military general
Carlos Soublette January 28, 1843 – January 20, 1847 Indirect elections Military general
José Tadeo Monagas January 20, 1847 – February 5, 1851 Indirect elections Military general
José Gregorio Monagas February 5, 1851 – January 20, 1855 Indirect elections Military general
José Tadeo Monagas January 20, 1855 – March 15, 1858 Indirect elections Military general
Pedro Gual Escandón March 15, 1858 – March 18, 1858 Acting president Lawyer
Julián Castro March 18, 1858 – August 2, 1859 Coup d'état Military general
Pedro Gual Escandón August 2, 1859 – September 29, 1859 Acting president Lawyer
Manuel Felipe de Tovar September 29, 1859 – May 20, 1861 Coup d'état (first term);
Direct elections (second term)
Politician
Pedro Gual Escandón May 20, 1861 – August 29, 1861 Acting president Lawyer
José Antonio Páez August 29, 1861 – June 15, 1863 Dictatorship Military general
Juan Crisóstomo Falcón June 15, 1863 – March 18, 1865 Victory in the Federal War (first term) Military general
Juan Crisóstomo Falcón March 18, 1865 – April 25, 1868 Indirect elections (second term) Military general
Manuel Ezequiel Bruzual April 25, 1868 – June 28, 1868 Acting president Military officer
Guillermo Tell Villegas June 28, 1868 – February 20, 1869 Acting president Lawyer / Military
José Ruperto Monagas February 20, 1869 – April 16, 1870 Revolution Military general
Guillermo Tell Villegas April 16, 1870 – April 27, 1870 Acting president Lawyer / Military
Antonio Guzmán Blanco April 27, 1870 – February 20, 1873 Revolution (first term) Lawyer / Military general
Antonio Guzmán Blanco February 20, 1873 – February 27, 1877 Indirect elections (second term) Lawyer / Military general
Francisco Linares Alcántara February 27, 1877 – November 30, 1878 Indirect elections Military general
José Gregorio Valera November 30, 1878 – February 26, 1879 Acting president Military general
Antonio Guzmán Blanco February 26, 1879 – April 26, 1884 Election by the Federal States Lawyer / Military general
Joaquín Sinforiano de Jesús Crespo April 26, 1884 – September 15, 1886 Elections by the Federal States Military general
Antonio Guzmán Blanco September 15, 1886 – August 8, 1887 Elections by the Federal States Lawyer / Military general
Hermógenes López August 8, 1887 – July 2, 1888 Intermin caretaker Military general
Juan Pablo Rojas Paúl July 2, 1888 – March 19, 1890 Elections by the Federal States Lawyer
Raimundo Andueza Palacio March 19, 1890 – June 17, 1892 Elections by the Federal States Lawyer
Guillermo Tell Villegas June 17, 1892 – August 31, 1892 Acting president Lawyer / Military
Guillermo Tell Villegas Pulido August 31, 1892 – October 7, 1892 Acting president Lawyer
Joaquín Sinforiano de Jesús Crespo October 7, 1892 – March 14, 1894 Revolution Military general
Joaquín Sinforiano de Jesús Crespo March 14, 1894 – February 28, 1898 Elections by the Federal States Military general
Ignacio Andrade February 28, 1898 – October 20, 1899 Direct elections Politician
Cipriano Castro Ruiz October 20, 1899 – December 19, 1908 Revolution Military general
Juan Vicente Gómez December 19, 1908 – August 5, 1913 Coup d'état Military general
José Gil Fortoul August 5, 1913 – April 19, 1914 Acting president Lawyer
Victorino Márquez Bustillos April 19, 1914 – June 24, 1922 Acting president[4] Lawyer / politician
Juan Vicente Gómez June 24, 1922 – May 30, 1929 Military general
Juan Bautista Pérez May 30, 1929 – June 13, 1931 Indirect election by the National Assembly Lawyer / magistrate
Juan Vicente Gómez June 13, 1931 – December 17, 1935 Indirect election by the National Assembly Military general
Eleazar López Contreras December 18, 1935 – June 30, 1936 Interim caretaker Military general
Eleazar López Contreras June 30, 1936 – May 5, 1941 Indirect elections Military general
Isaías Medina Angarita May 5, 1941 – October 18, 1945 Indirect elections Military general
Rómulo Ernesto Betancourt Bello October 19, 1945 – February 17, 1948 Coup d'état Politician
Rómulo Gallegos Freire February 17, 1948 – November 24, 1948 Direct elections Writer / Novelist
Carlos Delgado Chalbaud November 24, 1948 – November 13, 1950 Coup d'état Military officer
Germán Suárez Flamerich November 27, 1950 – December 2, 1952 Interim caretaker Lawyer
Marcos Pérez Jiménez December 2, 1952 – January 23, 1958 Indirect elections Military officer
Wolfgang Larrazábal January 23, 1958 – November 14, 1958 Coup d'état Rear admiral
Edgar Sanabria November 14, 1958 – February 13, 1959 Interim caretaker Lawyer
Rómulo Ernesto Betancourt Bello February 13, 1959 – March 13, 1964 Direct elections Politician
Raúl Leoni Otero March 13, 1964 – March 11, 1969 Direct elections Lawyer
Rafael Caldera Rodríguez March 11, 1969 – March 12, 1974 Direct elections Lawyer
Carlos Andrés Pérez Rodríguez March 12, 1974 – March 12, 1979 Direct elections Politician
Luis Herrera Campins March 12, 1979 – February 2, 1984 Direct elections Lawyer
Jaime Lusinchi February 2, 1984 – February 2, 1989 Direct elections Physician
Carlos Andrés Pérez Rodríguez[5] February 2, 1989 – May 21, 1993 Direct elections Politician
Octavio Lepage Barreto[6] May 21, 1993 – June 5, 1993 Acting president Lawyer / Politician
Ramón José Velásquez June 5, 1993 – February 2, 1994 Acting president Writer
Rafael Caldera Rodríguez February 2, 1994 – February 2, 1999 Direct elections Lawyer
Hugo Chávez Frias February 2, 1999 – April 12, 2002[7] Direct elections Military officer
(Lt. colonel)
Pedro Carmona April 12, 2002 – April 13, 2002 Coup d'état attempt Businessman / Union leader
Diosdado Cabello April 13, 2002 – April 14, 2002 Acting president Engineer / politician
Hugo Chávez Frias April 14, 2002 – March 5, 2013[8] Restoration (first term)
Direct elections (second term)
Military officer
(Lt. colonel)
Nicolás Maduro March 5, 2013 – April 19, 2013 Acting president Bus driver / Union leader[9]
Nicolás Maduro April 19, 2013 – present Direct elections Bus driver / Union leader [9]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Chavez wins chance of fresh term".  
  2. ^ (Spanish) "Presidentes de Venezuela". Consulado General de Bucaramanga. Archived from the original on August 1, 2010. 
  3. ^ Briceño Perozo, Mario. "Mendoza, Cristóbal de" in Diccionario de Historia de Venezuela, Vol. 3. Caracas: Fundación Polar, 1999. ISBN 978-980-6397-37-8.
  4. ^ Bustillos was appointed to the presidency in a provisional fashion after Juan Vicente Gómez, after himself being elected (by the National Assembly) as president. Gómez opted not to assume the presidency, instead choosing to continue in the role of commanding the Venezuelan Army.
  5. ^ On May 21, 1993, Pérez resigned after being accused of corruption by the Attorney General.
  6. ^ Octavio Lepage was the President of Congress and was in charge of the government until Ramón J. Velásquez was elected by Congress on June 5, 1993.
  7. ^ On April 11, 2002, senior military officers refused Chávez's orders to carry out Plan Ávila. They launched a coup d'état attempt, arrested Chávez (saying he had resigned), and Pedro Carmona assumed the presidency on April 12. Following an uprising, aided by sectors of the military loyal to Chávez, the new government collapsed and Chávez was restored to power early on April 14. Between the deposing of Carmona on April 13 and the return of Chávez, Vice President Diosdado Cabello assumed the presidency.
  8. ^ Chávez was never inaugurated for his fourth term due to his illness, and he died before inauguration could take place.
  9. ^ a b Wallis, Daniel (March 6, 2013). "Venezuela's Maduro: from bus driver to Chavez's successor".  

References

  • (Spanish) "Nuestros Presidentes – Official government portal for presidential biographies". Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. 
  • (Spanish) Cuadro de Presidentes Venezolanos
  • (Spanish) Presidentes y jefes de Gobierno
  • (Spanish) Comentarios sobre la Lista de Presidentes

External links

  • Official portal for the President
  • Official government site (Government Online)
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