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List of St. Louis Rams broadcasters

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List of St. Louis Rams broadcasters

The Rams were the first NFL team to televise both their home and away games during the 1950 NFL season. The 1951 NFL Championship Game was the first Championship Game televised coast-to-coast.

Starting in 2009, the Rams' new flagship radio station is 101 ESPN, a new sports station in St. Louis. For these broadcasts, Steve Savard will be the play by play announcer, flanked by color commentator D'Marco Farr. Brian Stull will be the sideline reporter, and the pregame and postgame coverage will be led by St. Louis coaching legend Jim Hanifan, along with hosts Randy Karraker for pregame and Cliff Saunders for postgame, among other 101 ESPN personalities.

From 2000–2008, KLOU FM 103.3 was the Rams flagship station with Steve Savard as the play-by-play announcer. Until October 2005, Jack Snow had been the color analyst for nearly 20 years, dating back to the team's days in the Los Angeles area. Snow left the booth after suffering an illness and died in January 2006. Former Rams offensive line coach and former St. Louis Cardinals head coach Jim Hanifan joined the KLOU as the color analyst the year after Jack Snow's departure. They were joined by analyst D'Marco Farr and sideline reporter Malcolm Briggs.

Previously before the Rams moved to KLOU, from 1995–1999 the Rams games were broadcast on KSD 93.7 FM. Preseason games not shown on a national broadcast network are seen on KTVI, Channel 2, and are also seen in L.A. on KCOP, "MyNetworkTV channel 13."

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