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List of United States rapid transit systems by ridership

 

List of United States rapid transit systems by ridership

The following is a list of all heavy rail rapid transit systems in the United States. It does not include statistics for bus or light rail systems (see: List of United States light rail systems by ridership for the latter). All ridership figures represent "unlinked" passenger trips (i.e. line transfers on multi-line systems register as separate trips). The data are provided by the American Public Transportation Association's Ridership Reports.

System Transit agency City/Area served Annual ridership
(2013)[1]
Avg. weekday ridership
(Q4 2013)[1]
System
length
Rider. per mile Opened Stations Lines
1. New York City Subway New York City Transit Authority[note 1] New York City 2,651,804,600 8,733,300 7002232000000000000232 miles (373 km)[2] 37,644 1904[3] 468[3] 24[3]
2. Washington Metro Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Washington, D.C. 273,464,800 855,300 7002117000000000000117 miles (188 km)[4] 8,046 1976[4] 91[4] 6
3. Chicago 'L' Chicago Transit Authority Chicago 228,864,400 734,900 7002102800000000000102.8 miles (165.4 km)[5] 7,149 1892[5] 145[5] 8[5]
4. MBTA Subway[note 2]
(Blue, Orange, and Red Lines)
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Boston 166,672,800 549,100 700138000000000000038 miles (61 km)[6] 14,450 1901 53[6] 4[6]
5. Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Bay Area Rapid Transit District San Francisco Bay Area 124,747,400 400,300 7002104000000000000104 miles (167 km)[7] 3,849 1972[8] 44[7] 5[9]
6. SEPTA[note 2]
(Broad Street, Market–Frankford, and Norristown High Speed Lines)
Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority Philadelphia 98,438,000 333,600 700136700000000000036.7 miles (59.1 km)[10][11] 9,090 1907[12] 75[13] 3[13]
7. Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Manhattan (New York); Jersey City (New Jersey), and Newark (New Jersey) 72,798,500 248,100 700113800000000000013.8 miles (22.2 km)[14][15] 17,978 1908[16] 13[14] 4[17]
8. MARTA rail system Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority Atlanta 69,905,400 221,200 700147600000000000047.6 miles (76.6 km) 4,647 1979[18] 38[19] 4[19]
9. Metro Rail[note 2]
(Purple and Red Lines)
Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Los Angeles 51,030,700 168,200 700117400000000000017.4 miles (28.0 km)[20] 9,667 1993[20] 16[20] 2[20]
10. Metrorail Miami-Dade Transit Miami 21,275,400 72,700 700124400000000000024.4 miles (39.3 km)[21] 2,980 1984[22] 23[21] 2[21]
11. Baltimore Metro Subway Maryland Transit Administration Baltimore 15,034,400 48,500 700115500000000000015.5 miles (24.9 km)[23] 3,129 1983[24] 14[23] 1[23]
12. Tren Urbano Departamento de Transportación y Obras Públicas San Juan 10,974,500 42,300 700110700000000000010.7 miles (17.2 km)[25] 3,953 2004[25] 16[25] 1[25]
13. PATCO Speedline Port Authority Transit Corporation Philadelphia, southern New Jersey 10,542,200 36,300 700114200000000000014.2 miles (22.9 km)[26] 2,556 1936[26] 13[26] 1[26]
14. RTA Rapid Transit[note 2]
(Red Line)
Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority Cleveland 6,422,800 18,631[note 3] 700119000000000000019 miles (31 km)[27] 981 1955[28] 18[27] 1[27]
15. Staten Island Railway Staten Island Railway[note 1] Staten Island (New York City) 4,220,600 15,900 700114000000000000014 miles (23 km)[2] 1,136 1860[29] 22[2] 1[2]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Agency is a subsidiary of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
  2. ^ a b c d System also includes light rail lines. Ridership data for such lines is not included in statistics given.
  3. ^ This figure is the Average Daily Ridership figure, not an "Average Weekday Ridership" figure - it is averaged from the Q4 2013 Total Ridership figure for this system.

References

  1. ^ a b "APTA Ridership Report - Q4 2013 Report" (pdf).  
  2. ^ a b c d "Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Years Ended December 31, 2012 and 2011" (pdf).  
  3. ^ a b c "The MTA Network - New York City Transit at a Glance".  
  4. ^ a b c "About Metro". Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. 2014. Retrieved August 28, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Facts at a Glance".  
  6. ^ a b c "Ridership and Service Statistics, Fourteenth Edition 2014" (pdf).  
  7. ^ a b "System Facts".  
  8. ^ "Rider recalls first day of BART passenger service on Sept. 11, 1972".  
  9. ^ "BART - Schedules By Line".  
  10. ^ "SEPTA Route Statistics 2014" (pdf).  
  11. ^ "Media Guide" (pdf).  
  12. ^ "SEPTA 'Elebrates' End Of Project".  
  13. ^ a b "SEPTA Operating Facts Fiscal Year 2013" (pdf).  
  14. ^ a b "Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and Criteria Air Pollutant (CAP) Emission Inventory (EI) for the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey: 2008 Summary and 2006-2008 Trends" (pdf).  
  15. ^ "Facts & Info - PATH - The Port Authority of NY & NJ".  
  16. ^ "History".  
  17. ^ "Maps & Schedule".  
  18. ^ "About MARTA: MARTA's Past & Future".  
  19. ^ a b "Bombardier Partners with Atlanta to Improve Track Worker Protection with TrackSafe Technology" (Press release).  
  20. ^ a b c d "Chapter 1.0 - Purpose and Need", Westside Transit Corridor Extension Study: Final Alternatives Analysis Study (pdf),  
  21. ^ a b c "Metrorail".  
  22. ^ "Miami-Dade Transit History".  
  23. ^ a b c "Metro Subway".  
  24. ^ "2010-2011 MTA Media Guide" (pdf).  
  25. ^ a b c d "Project Profiles: Tren Urbano".  
  26. ^ a b c d "A History of Commitment".  
  27. ^ a b c "2013 Annual Report - RTA Facts". Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. October 31, 2013. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  28. ^ "RTA History".  
  29. ^ Chan, Sewell; Schweber, Nate (December 26, 2008). "Staten Island Rail Car Derails in Tottenville".  
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