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List of Widerøe destinations

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Title: List of Widerøe destinations  
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List of Widerøe destinations

Route map

Widerøe is the third-largest airline of Norway and the largest regional airline in the Nordic countries. They operate a fleet of 33 Bombardier Dash 8 aircraft to forty-three domestic and five international destinations. Owned by the SAS Group, Widerøe generates 40 percent of their traffic from public service obligations (PSO) with the Ministry of Transport and Communications. The company had a revenue of 2,500 million Norwegian krone, flew 380 daily flights and served two million passengers in 2012. The Bodø-based company has 1,300 employees.[1]

Widerøe was founded in 1934. From the 1940s Widerøe started flying various seaplane routes for Norwegian Air Lines and later Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS). These routes were commonly flown using Noorduyn Norseman and de Havilland Canada Otter aircraft.[2] From the mid-1960s a network of regional airports was built and Widerøe received the concession to operate the routes. The first four airports opened in Helgeland in 1968, followed by four in Sogn og Fjordane and Sunnmøre in 1971, three in Lofoten and Vesterålen in 1972, five in northern Troms and Finnmark in 1974 and another three by 1977. Originally these were served with the de Havilland Canada Twin Otter, supplemented with the de Havilland Canada Dash 7 from 1981.[3]

Four additional regional airport opened in 1986 and 1987.[3] The following three years Widerøe took over services at four airports from the failing Norving.[4] Norsk Air was bought in 1989, making Sandefjord Airport, Torp a major base.[5] The entire fleet was replaced with the de Havilland Canada Dash 8 between 1993 and 1995.[6] From 1997 all subsidized routes became subject to PSOs, although Widerøe has been able to win most tenders.[7] Except out of Torp, International scheduled flights commenced in 1994 and since Widerøe has provided a small range of international destinations as part of their network.[8] Widerøe took over SAS Commuter's operations in Northern Norway in 2002[9] and SAS' operations in Western Norway in 2010.[10]

Destinations

Dash 7 at Hammerfest Airport in 1987
Sørkjosen Airport seen from the cockpit of a Widerøe Dash 8-300
* Non-continuous service
Terminated service
List of Widerøe destinations
City Country Airport Begin End Ref(s)
Aberdeen United Kingdom Aberdeen Airport 1999 [11]
Ålesund Norway Ålesund Airport, Vigra 1971 [12][13][14]
Alta Norway Alta Airport 1974 [15]
Bergen Norway Bergen Airport, Flesland 1971 [16]
Berlin Germany Berlin Tempelhof Airport 1997 2001 [17][18]
Båtsfjord Norway Båtsfjord Airport 1990 1999 [4][19]
Båtsfjord Norway Båtsfjord Airport 1999 [19]
Bodø Norway Bodø Airport 1968 [12]
Brønnøysund Norway Brønnøysund Airport, Brønnøy 1968 [12]
Berlevåg Norway Berlevåg Airport 1974 [15]
Copenhagen Denmark Copenhagen Airport 1989 [20]
Edinburgh United Kingdom Edinburgh Airport 2006 2011 [21][22]
Fagernes Norway Fagernes Airport, Leirin 1999 2000 [23][24]
Florø Norway Florø Airport 1971* [16][25]
Førde Norway Førde Airport, Bringeland 1986 [26]
Førde Norway Førde Airport, Øyrane 1971 1986 [26]
Glasgow United Kingdom Glasgow International Airport 1997 1999 [27][28]
Gothenburg Sweden Gothenburg-Landvetter Airport 1996 [29]
Hemavan Sweden Hemavan Airport 1995 1995 [30][31]
Hammerfest Norway Hammerfest Airport 1974 [15]
Haugesund Norway Haugesund Airport, Karmøy 2010 [10]
Honningsvåg Norway Honningsvåg Airport 1977 [15]
Harstad/Narvik Norway Harstad/Narvik Airport, Evenes 1975* [9][32]
Hasvik Norway Hasvik Airport 1990 [4]
Kirkenes Norway Kirkenes Airport, Høybuktmoen 1974 [15]
Kristiansand Norway Kristiansand Airport, Kjevik 1991* [5][10]
Kristiansund Norway Kristiansund Airport, Kvernberget 1971* [10][16]
Lakselv Norway Lakselv Airport, Banak 1974 [15]
Leknes Norway Leknes Airport 1972 [16]
Lerwick United Kingdom Sumburgh Airport 1995* 2005 [30][33][34]
London United Kingdom London Stansted Airport 1989 1992 [5]
Mehamn Norway Mehamn Airport 1974 [15]
Mo i Rana Norway Mo i Rana Airport, Røssvoll 1968 [12]
Mosjøen Norway Mosjøen Airport, Kjærstad 1987 [35]
Molde Norway Molde Airport, Årø 1972* [10][16]
Murmansk Russia Murmansk Airport 1994 2000 [8][36]
Narvik Norway Narvik Airport, Framnes 1975* [15]
Namsos Norway Namsos Airport, Høknesøra 1968 [12]
Newcastle United Kingdom Newcastle Airport 2006 [21]
Ørland Norway Ørland Airport 1971 1987 [37]
Ørsta/Volda Norway Ørsta–Volda Airport, Hovden 1971 [16]
Oslo Norway Oslo Airport, Fornebu 1974 1998 [15][38]
Oslo Norway Oslo Airport, Gardermoen 1998 [38]
Rønne Denmark Bornholm Airport 2007 [39]
Røros Norway Røros Airport 2001* [40][41][42]
Rørvik Norway Rørvik Airport, Ryum 1988 [43]
Røst Norway Røst Airport 1986* [44][45]
Sandane Norway Sandane Airport, Anda 1975 [15]
Sandefjord Norway Sandefjord Airport, Torp 1989 [5]
Sandnessjøen Norway Sandnessjøen Airport, Stokka 1968 [12]
Skien Norway Skien Airport, Geiteryggen 1989* [46]
Sogndal Norway Sogndal Airport, Haukåsen 1971 [16]
Sørkjosen Norway Sørkjosen Airport 1974 [15]
Stavanger Norway Stavanger Airport, Sola 1989 [47]
Stockholm Sweden Stockholm-Arlanda Airport 1999 2006 [48][49]
Stokmarknes Norway Stokmarknes Airport, Skagen 1972 [16]
Svolvær Norway Svolvær Airport, Helle 1972 [16]
Tromsø Norway Tromsø Airport 1974 [15]
Trondheim Norway Trondheim Airport, Værnes 1968 [12]
Umeå Sweden Umeå Airport 1995 1995 [30][31]
Værøy Norway Værøy Airport 1986 1990 [44][50]
Vadsø Norway Vadsø Airport 1974 [15]
Vardø Norway Vardø Airport 1990 [4]
Visby Sweden Visby Airport 2004 [33]

References

  1. ^ "Widerøe skylder SAS over 600 millioner" (in Norwegian).  
  2. ^ Arnesen: 48–59
  3. ^ a b Gynnild, Olav (2009). "Flyplassenes og flytrafikkens historie". Kulturminner på norske lufthavner – Landsverneplan for Avinor.  
  4. ^ a b c d Hay, Trine (3 February 1990). "Widerøe vant, får fly i nord".  
  5. ^ a b c d Tjomsland: 128–130
  6. ^ Evensen, Kjell (13 December 1995). "Widerøe vil nå videre ut".  
  7. ^ Tuv, Kirsten (2 November 1996). "Widerøe-monopol".  
  8. ^ a b "Widerøe flyr til Murmansk" (in Norwegian).  
  9. ^ a b Arnt, Folgerø (17 April 2002). "SAS skal spare penger på rutenedleggelser" (in Norwegian).  
  10. ^ a b c d e Berg, Vidar (27 May 2010). "Widerøe åpner fire nye ruter".  
  11. ^ "Widerøe's med daglig Aberdeen-rute".  
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Arnesen: 99–109
  13. ^ Sæthre, Lars N. (21 June 1996). "Staten legger Widerøes rutenett ut for salg i EU".  
  14. ^ "Kortbanenettet ut på anbud igjen".  
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Arnesen: 124–130
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i Arnesen: 117–124
  17. ^ "Widerøe starter direkterute Oslo-Berlin" (in Norwegian).  
  18. ^ "Widerøe vil bli ledende regional-selskap i Nord-Europa" (in Norwegian).  
  19. ^ a b Rapp, Magnus (8 September 1999). "Flertall på Stortinget Nei til småfly på kortbanene".  
  20. ^ Tjomsland: 102–103
  21. ^ a b Valderhaug, Rune (19 January 2006). "Starter flyruter over Nordsjøen".  
  22. ^ "Flere nye avganger".  
  23. ^ Stedje, Jan (1 August 1999). "Siste fly fra Fagernes til Flesland".  
  24. ^  
  25. ^ Grytås, Gunnar (21 September 1999). "Widerøes får selskap".  
  26. ^ a b "Lufthavnens historie" (in Norwegian).  
  27. ^ "Widerøe øker rutetilbude" (in Norwegian).  
  28. ^ "Widerøe øker antall flygninger fra Torp" (in Norwegian).  
  29. ^ "Sure SAS-piloter".  
  30. ^ a b c "Fly til Shetland".  
  31. ^ a b "Ny flyglinje i norr planeras".  
  32. ^ Svendsen: 397
  33. ^ a b "Widerøe med turistruter til Gotland og Shetland" (in Norwegian).  
  34. ^ "Ny Smyril-sjef vil samarbeide med Widerøe" (in Norwegian). 20 June 2005. 
  35. ^ Myhrvold, Brit (21 August 1987). "Ny flyplass i Mosjøen: Betyr ny giv for distriktet" (in Norwegian). p. 37. 
  36. ^ Gustad, Ragnhild (10 February 2001). "Arctic Air flyr til Murmansk".  
  37. ^ Hovd: 388–389
  38. ^ a b Bredal: 42
  39. ^ "Widerøe med sommersatsning".  
  40. ^ "Overtar ruten Oslo-Røros".  
  41. ^ "Widerøe "vant" 11 av 16 ruter".  
  42. ^ "Widerøe fikk konsesjoner" (in Norwegian). 12 January 2009. p. 24. 
  43. ^ "Widerøes sommerruter godkjent" (in Norwegian). 16 March 1988. 
  44. ^ a b Lillesund, Geir (1 November 1996). "Widerøes med enerett på kortbanenettet" (in Norwegian).  
  45. ^ Mikalsen, Kjell (10 June 2003). "Svikter Cato Air".  
  46. ^ Tjomsland: 150–159
  47. ^ Tjomsland: 102–105
  48. ^ "Ny Widerøe-rute til Stockholm" (in Norwegian).  
  49. ^ Guhnfeldt, Cato (9 September 2006). "Widerøe kutter".  
  50. ^ Ingebrigtsen, Terje and Roger Mortensen (29 September 1997). "Værøy lufthavn stengt for fly".  
Bibliography
  • Arnesen, Odd (1984). På grønne vinger over Norge (in Norwegian). Widerøe's Flyveselskap. 
  • Bredal, Dag (1998). Oslo lufthavn Gardermoen: Porten til Norge (in Norwegian). Schibsted.  
  • Hovd, Rune (2004). Ørland hovedflystasjon: Okkupasjon – Kald krig – Ny tid – Lokalsamfunn (in Norwegian). Ørland: Ørland Main Air Station. 
  • Svendsen, Oddvar (2002). Narviks historie: Storhetstid, brytningstid, framtidshåp (in Norwegian) 2. Narvik: Stiftelsen Narviks historieverk.  
  • Tjomsland, Audun (2005). Høyt spill om Torp (in Norwegian). Sandefjord: Tjomsland Media.  
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