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List of electric cars currently available

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List of electric cars currently available

This is a list of production all-electric cars, classified by type of vehicle according to its speed capabilities: low speed or neighborhood electric vehicle, urban or city car, highway-capable and raceway.

Contents

  • Low speed 1
  • City speed 2
  • Highway capable 3
  • Raceway 4
  • See also 5
  • Gallery 6
  • References 7

Low speed

Economy cars with a top speed of 60 km/h (37 mph) or less
Model Top speed Capacity
(Adults)
Charging time Nominal range Market release date
Dynasty IT 40 km/h (25 mph) 2/4 6 hours.[1] 50 km (31 mi) April 2001.[2]
Electric Hummer 65 km/h (40 mph) 2 8 hours (complete recharge) 70–90 km (43–56 mi) Manufactured by Prindiville.
The Electric Hummer is an official licensed product of General Motors [3]
GEM Car 40 km/h (25 mph) 2/4/6 6–8 hours.[4] 48 km (30 mi) April 1998.[5]
Hummer HX 2 8 hours (complete recharge) 70–90 km (43–56 mi) Manufactured by My Electric Vehicle.
The Electric Hummer is an official licensed product of General Motors [6]
Oka NEV ZEV 40 km/h (25 mph) 2 8 hours.[7]   1987.[8]
The Kurrent 40 km/h (25 mph) 2 8 hours.[9] 60 km (37 mi) 1987.[8]
ZEV Smiley 50 km/h (31 mph) 2 up to 10 hours.[10] 120 km (75 mi) 2nd quarter 2007.[11]

City speed

City cars with a top speed of 100 km/h (62 mph) or less.
Model Top speed Capacity
(Adults)
Charging time Nominal range Market release date
Kewet Buddy 80 km/h (50 mph) 3 [12] 6–8 hours.[13] 40–80 km (25–50 mi) January 2010
Citroën C1 ev'ie 97 km/h (60 mph)[14] 4[14] 6–7 hours[14] 100 to 110 km (60 to 70 mi)[14] 30 April 2009 UK only[14]
CityEl 63 km/h (39 mph) 1 8 hours (complete recharge) 80–90 km (50–56 mi) First manufactured in Denmark 1987 under the name of "Mini-el" until 1992.
New production started in 1995 by a German company.[15]
Mia electric 100 km/h (62 mph) 1 to 4 adults 3 to 5 hours when charged from household 125 km (78 mi) Available in Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, Italy, France, United Kingdom, Norway, Czech Republic, South Africa, Mexico
MyCar 64 km/h (40 mph) 2 5 to 8 hrs 64–110 km (40–68 mi)  
NICE Mega City 64 km/h (40 mph)[16] 4[16] 8 hours.[17] 96 km (60 mi)[16] October 2006.[18]
QBeak 90 km/h (56 mph) 4 adults 8 hrs 250 km (155 mi) Available in Denmark for now.[19]
Stevens Zecar[20] 90 km/h (56 mph)[20] 5 [21] 6–8 hours.[22] 80 km (50 mi) March 2008.[23]

Highway capable

Road cars with a top speed above 105 km/h (65 mph)
Model Top speed Acceleration Capacity
adults+kids
Charging time Nominal range Market release date
BEV Electron 110 km/h (68 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 7 seconds 5 adults 9 hrs with onboard charger

1.5 hrs with external charger

120 km (75 mi) Available in Australia only.[24][25]
BMW i3 150 km/h (93 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in less than 8 seconds 4 adults 4h with the 240-volt charging unit or less than 30 minutes at public DC charging stations (when charging from 0 to 80%) 130 to 160 km (81 to 99 mi) Released in Europe in 2013.
A gasoline-powered range extender option is available to increased range to 240 to 300 km (150 to 190 mi)
BMW Brilliance Zinoro 1E 130 km/h (81 mph) 150 km (93 mi) [26] Released in China in early 2014.[27]
BYD e6 140 km/h (87 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in < 8 seconds 5 adults 300 km (186 mi) Field testing as taxi fleet began in Shenzhen, China in May 2010.[28]
Chery QQ3 EV Launched in China in March 2010
Chevrolet Spark EV 132 km (82 mi)[29] The first all-electric car from General Motors after the GM EV1. It was released in limited quantities in the U.S. in selected markets in California and Oregon in June 2013.[30]
Citroën C-Zero 130 km/h (81 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 15.9 seconds. 4 adults 7 hours when charged from household; 30 minutes when charging from a quick charger system[31] 150 km (93 mi) Available in Europe.[31]
Fiat 500e 142 km/h (88 mph) 0-97 km/h (60 mph) in 8.5 seconds. 140 km (87 mi) Available in California only
Ford Focus Electric 135 km/h (84 mph) 0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 10.2 seconds. 5 adults 18 to 20 hours when charged from 120v outlet; 3 to 4 hours when charged from 240V outlet.[32] 122 km (76 mi) Available in the U.S. since December 2011; available in Europe since August 2013.[33]
Honda Fit EV 148 km/h (92 mph) 0-97 km/h (60 mph) in 9.5 seconds. 132 km (82 mi)
JAC J3 EV Launched in China in 2010
Kia Soul EV 150 km (93 mi) EPA,
130 to 190 km (81 to 118 mi) Kia
2014
Lightning GT 200 km/h (124 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in < 5 seconds. 2 adults under an hour 240 km (149 mi) 2013
Mia electric 100 km/h (62 mph) 1 to 4 adults 3 to 5 hours when charged from household 125 km (78 mi) Available in Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, Italy, France, United Kingdom, Norway, Czech Republic, South Africa, Mexico
Mitsubishi i-MiEV 130 km/h (81 mph) 4 adults 7 to 14 hours when charged from household, depending on the type of power; 30 minutes when charging from a quick charger system (80% charged)[34] 170 km (106 mi) Released in Japan in July 2009 for fleet customers. Available in Japan, Hong Kong, Australia, Europe, the U.S., Canada and some Latin American countries. As of July 2014, global sales reached 32,000 units, including the rebadged variants Peugeot iOn and Citroën C-Zero sold in Europe.[35]
[36] 185 km/h (115 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 6 seconds. 2 adults
Nissan Leaf 2011/2012 model 150 km/h (93 mph) 5 adults up to 20 hours when charged from 110/120v outlet; 8 hours when charging from 220/240 volt outlet; 30 minutes for 440v "quick charge" (to 80% of battery capacity) 117 km (73 mi) (EPA) / 175 km (109 mi) (NEDC) Released in the U.S. and Japan in December 2010, is available in 35 countries. The Leaf is the top selling electric car ever, with global sales of 125,000 units by July 2014.[37]
Nissan Leaf 2013 model 150 km/h (93 mph) 5 adults up to 20 hours when charged from 110/120v outlet; 8 hours when charging from 220/240 volt outlet; 30 minutes for 440v "quick charge" (to 80% of battery capacity) 121 km (75 mi) EPA / 200 km (120 mi) (NEDC) Released in the U.S. and Japan in December 2010, is available in 35 countries. The Leaf is the top selling electric car ever, with global sales of 125,000 units by July 2014.[37]
Renault Fluence ZE 135 km/h (84 mph), electronically limited 5 adults battery swap in 5 minutes 135 km (84 mi) + 15 km limp home mode Released in France in 2010, Israel in Jan 2012, UK in Jan 2012, Turkey in May 2012.
Renault Zoe 135 km/h (84 mph), electronically limited 0–100 km/h (62 mph), in 13.5 seconds 5 adults six to nine hours with 3.7 kW, 30 minutes with 43 kW (80 %)[38] 210 km (130 mi) Released in France in December 2012
Smart electric drive first generation 120 km/h (75 mph) 2 4 hours (80%), 8 hours (100%) 110 km (68 mi) 2007, initially for corporate clients in London
Smart electric drive second generation 100 km/h (62 mph) 0–60 km/h (37 mph) in 6.5 seconds 2 3 hours (20% to 80%) 135 km (84 mi) 2009, to 18 European markets
Smart electric drive third generation 125 km/h (78 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 11.5 seconds; 0–60 km/h (37 mph) in 5 seconds 2 145 km (90 mi) 2013, in the United States and the EU
Tesla Model S P85 kW·h 214 km/h (133 mph)
0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 4.2 seconds 5 adults + 2 kids (optional) battery swap in 1.5 minutes;[39] 50% in about 20 minutes by Tesla Superchargers[40] 426 km (265 mi) (EPA)
483 km (300 mi) (Tesla Motors)
Available in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Hong Kong. As of June 2014, a total of 39,163 units have been delivered.[41][42]
Tesla Model S 85 kW·h 201 km/h (125 mph)
0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 5.6 seconds
5 adults + 2 kids (optional) battery swap in 1.5 minutes;[39] 50% in about 20 minutes by Tesla Superchargers[40] 426 km (265 mi) (EPA)
483 km (300 mi) (Tesla Motors)
Available in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Hong Kong. As of June 2014, a total of 39,163 units have been delivered.[43][44]
Tesla Model S 60 kW·h 193 km/h (120 mph)
0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 5.9 seconds
5 adults + 2 kids (optional) battery swap in 1.5 minutes;[39] 50% in about 20 minutes by Tesla Superchargers[40] 335 km (208 mi) (EPA)
370 km (230 mi) (Tesla Motors)
Available in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Hong Kong. As of June 2014, a total of 39,163 units have been delivered.[45][46]
Venturi Fétish 200 km/h (124 mph)[47] 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 4 seconds. 2 adults 3 hours with external charge booster, 8 hours with onboard charging system 340 km (211 mi) 2006 to present
Volkswagen e-Golf 145 km/h (90 mph) 5 adults 2.3 kW plugged into any standard 230V socket, 3.6 kW via a home-installed wall box or with up to 40 kW plugged into a DC fast-charging station 190 km (118 mi) Released in Europe in March 2014
Volkswagen e-Up! 130 km/h (81 mph) 4 adults 2.3 kW plugged into any standard 230V socket, 3.6 kW via a home-installed wall box or with up to 40 kW plugged into a DC fast-charging station 160 km (99 mi) Released in Europe in October 2013

Raceway

Race cars with a top speed near 200 km/h (120 mph)
Model Top speed Acceleration Capacity
adults+kids
Power Nominal range Market release date
Aptima eCobra est higher than 240 PS (176.5 kW; 236.7 hp) 0-97 km/h (60 mph) in 3.9 seconds 2 adults 263 watt electric motor at 5500 RPM 242 km (150 mi) Available in street rod racing conversions only.[48][49]
Detroit Electric SP:01 [50] 249 km/h (155 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.7 seconds. 2 adults 150 kW (200 bhp) 300 km (186 mi) 2014
Li-ion Inizio R - Rally 209 km/h (130 mph) 0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 5.9 seconds
2 adults 240 km (149 mi)
Li-ion Inizio RT - Rally Touring 212 km/h (132 mph) 0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 7.1 seconds 2 adults 400 km (249 mi)
Li-ion Inizio RTX - Rally Touring Extreme 273 km/h (170 mph) [51] 0–97 km/h (60 mph) in 3.4 seconds 2 adults 320 km (199 mi)
Lola-Drayson B12/69EV [52] 320 km/h (199 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 3 seconds. single-seater 630 kW (850 bhp) Le Mans prototype
Nemesis 239 km/h (149 mph) experimental 2 adults na 239 km (149 mi) modified Lotus Exige [53]
Rimac Concept One 304 km/h (189 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.8 seconds. 2 adults 811 kW (1,088 bhp) 500 km (311 mi) Rimac Automobile showcase in Croatia
Spark-Renault SRT 01E 250 km/h (155 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 3 seconds. single-seater 200 kW (268 hp) 2014–15 Formula E season
Tango 240 km/h (149 mph) 0–96 km/h (60 mph) in 4 sec 2 less than 3 hours;[54] 80% capacity in around 10 minutes on a 200 amp AC service [55] 128 km (80 mi) Available, Tango T600 is less than half the width of a normal car.[56]
Volar-e [57] 300 km/h (190 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.4 seconds. 2 adults 746 kW (1,000 bhp), 1,000 N·m (738 lbf·ft) 200 km (124 mi) experimental
VW Beetle dragster 300 km/h (186 mph) 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 1.6 seconds. unavailable unknown 300 km (186 mi) 2 experimental
ZAP Alias 251 km/h (156 mph) 0–60 km/h (37 mph) in 5.7 seconds. unavailable unknown 160 km (99 mi) 2 experimental

See also

Gallery

References

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  3. ^ "Prindiville Electric Hummer". Retrieved 2013-06-20. 
  4. ^ "GEM Car". CNN. 2008-06-18. Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  5. ^ Global Electric Motorcars
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  7. ^ "Oka nev zev - faq". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  8. ^ a b "History". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  9. ^ "Frequently asked questions". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  10. ^ "Zero Emission Vehicles". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  11. ^ "Smiley". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  12. ^ "Buddy". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  13. ^ "Introducing:The New Buddy". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
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  15. ^ "CityEl". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  16. ^ a b c Smith, Giles (22 September 2008), "NICE Mega City",  
  17. ^ "A Note On the NICE "MEGA City" Electric Car: Review". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
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  19. ^ "Ecomove.dk". Ecomove.dk. 2010-11-16. Retrieved 2010-12-11. 
  20. ^ a b Meet The Zeecar,  
  21. ^ "Reva". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
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  27. ^ Hao Yan (2014-04-25). "BMW Brilliance's different path to crack market".  
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  38. ^ http://www.renault.ie/media/e-brochures/cars/att00e2f494d37e4200a8a988a0a429acbf/ZOE_Brochure.PDF
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  40. ^ a b c "Supercharger". Tesla. Retrieved 2013-09-25. 
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  42. ^ Jeff Cobb (2013-08-07). "Tesla Announces Q2 Financial Results". HybridCars.com. Retrieved 2013-08-07. 
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  53. ^ Maguire, John (2012-09-27). "Nemesis electric car breaks UK land-speed record". BBC News. Retrieved 2013-03-22. 
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  56. ^ "Best Electric Cars Reviews and Comments". Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  57. ^ Buckley, Sean (2013-03-01). "Volar-e EV racer goes for a test drive". Retrieved 2013-03-20. 
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