World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

List of foods of the Southern United States

Article Id: WHEBN0007505065
Reproduction Date:

Title: List of foods of the Southern United States  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of soul foods and dishes, Cuisine of the Midwestern United States, Cuisine of the United States, Lists of prepared foods, Barbecue in Texas
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

List of foods of the Southern United States

This is a list of foods of the Southern United States. The cuisine of the Southern United States is defined as the historical regional culinary form of states in the Southern United States. Southern cuisine has many various dishes and foods.

Beverages

Breads

Skillet cornbread

Desserts and sweets

Cakes

Candies

Cobblers

An apple cobbler

Cookies

Frozen

Pies

Puddings

Pastries

Meats, poultry and seafood

A pan of beef brisket, fresh out of the oven
Jambalaya cooking in a pan

Side dishes and condiments

Sausage gravy served atop biscuits

Soups, stews and boils

  • Georgia
  • Burgoo - served at barbecues in western and central Kentucky; similar to Brunswick stew
  • Chicken Sauce-Picquante - chicken cooked in a tangy stew with tomatoes and spices, often served over rice; a favorite in southern Louisiana
  • Conch chowder
  • Gumbo - made with seafood or meat and okra; a Cajun/Creole delicacy
  • Étouffée - a very thick stew made of crawfish or chicken and sausage, okra and roux served over rice
  • Low Country boil - any of several varieties
    • Frogmore Stew - made with sausage, corn, crabs, and shrimp; popular in coastal South Carolina
    • Seafood Muddle
  • Atlantic crabs
  • Terrapin stew - a historical dish of Atlantic Coast states such as Maryland and Virginia
  • Hoppin' John
  • Pilau - Any number of dishes which combine rice stewed with meat (chicken, sausage, pork, or wild game) and usually including onions or bell peppers. The most popular is chicken bog. These dishes are popular in South Carolina due to the influence of rice cultivation on the history of South Carolina.

Vegetables and salads

  • Mashed potatoes - called "creamed" in some regions
    • Rutmus - potatoes boiled and mashed with turnip bottoms and butter
  • Okra - flour-battered and pan-fried or boiled, stewed, or steamed
  • Vidalia, whole green onion, and onion rings
  • Peas - often cooked with chunks of ham or onions
  • Potato Salad - usually made in the South with egg, mayonnaise, prepared mustard and pickle relish
  • Purloo - a traditional Low Country dish made with ham, bacon, peppers and okra
  • Ramps - wild leeks popular in the mountains

Miscellaneous

A shrimp po' boy sandwich

See also

References

  1. ^ Old New Orleans Rum | Celebration Distillation
  2. ^ Fabricant, Florence (February 14, 2007). "So Naughty, So Nice".  
  3. ^ Flexner, Marion (2010). Out Of Kentucky Kitchens. University Press of Kentucky. p. 287. ISBN 0813129494
  4. ^ "Taste of the South: Chess Pie". Southern Living Magazine. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  5. ^ Screen Doors and Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales from a Southern Cook - Martha Hall Foose - Google Books
  6. ^ Hilburn, Prudence (April 23, 2013). "Prudence Hilburn: Any way you slice it, pecan pie a Southern favorite". The Gadsen Times. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
  7. ^ Adams, Jocelyn Delk (April 15, 2013). "[RECIPE] Banana Pudding Tiramisu". Ebony Magazine. Retrieved 2013-04-24. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.