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List of glassware

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List of glassware

Typical glassware

This list of glassware[1] includes drinking vessels (drinkware) and tableware used to set a table for eating a meal, general glass items such as vases, and glasses used in the catering industry, whether made of glass or plastics (such as polystyrene and polycarbonate). It does not include laboratory glassware.

Contents

  • Drinkware 1
  • Tumblers 2
  • Beer glassware 3
    • New Zealand beer glasses 3.1
    • Australian beer glasses 3.2
  • Stemware 4
  • Other 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Drinkware

Drinkware, beverageware (colloquially referred to as cups) is a general term for a vessel intended to contain beverages or liquid foods for drinking or consumption.[2]

The word cup comes from Middle English cuppe, from Old English, from Late Latin cuppa, drinking vessel, perhaps variant of Latin cupa, tub, cask.[2] The first known use of the word cup is before the 12th century.[4]

Tumblers

A classic 20-facet Soviet table-glass, produced in the city of Gus-Khrustalny since 1943.

Tumblers are flat-bottomed drinking glasses.

  • Collins glass, for a tall mixed drink[5]
  • Dizzy Cocktail glass, a glass with a wide, shallow bowl, comparable to a normal Cocktail glass but without the stem
  • Highball glass, for mixed drinks [6]
  • Iced tea glass
  • Juice glass, for fruit juices and vegetable juices.
  • Old Fashioned glass, traditionally, for a simple cocktail or liquor "on the rocks". Contemporary American "rocks" glasses may be much larger, and used for a variety of beverages over ice
  • Shot glass, a small glass for up to four ounces of liquor. The modern shot glass has a thicker base and sides than the older whiskey glass
  • Table-glass or stakan granyonyi
  • Water glass
  • Whiskey tumbler, a small, thin-walled glass for a straight shot of liquor

Beer glassware

Whisky tasting glass

New Zealand beer glasses

  • Handle – 425mL New Zealand beer glass
  • Jug – 750–1000mL served at pubs in New Zealand

Australian beer glasses

  • Middy – 285mL (10 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass (New South Wales)
  • Glass – 200mL (7 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass (Queensland & Victoria)
  • Pot – 285mL (10 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass (Queensland & Victoria).
  • Schooner – 425mL (15 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass, 285 mL (10 fl. oz.) in South Australia

Stemware

A stem glass

Other

A variety of drinking glasses
  • Art glass, glassware that is modern art
  • Glass container, container made from glass
  • Laboratory glassware, a variety of equipment, traditionally made of glass, used for scientific experiments
  • Pitcher, a container, usually with a spout for pouring its contents
  • Punch bowl, a bowl that punch is put in, generally used in parties
  • Vase, an open container often used to hold flowers

See also

References

  1. ^ "Glassware". The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  2. ^ a b "Cups". The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  3. ^ McClenehan, Robert L. Some Scottish Quaichs. Illinois, 1955, p. 3.
  4. ^ "Cup". Merriam Webster. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  5. ^ Herbst, Sharon; Herbst, Ron (1998). The Ultimate A-to-Z Bar Guide. New York: Broadway Books. p. 8.  
  6. ^ Rathbun, A. J. (2007). Good Spirits: Recipes, Revelations, Refreshments, and Romance, Shaken and Served with a Twist. Boston, Massachusetts: The Harvard Common Press. p. 13.  
  7. ^ Martin McGookin @ http://www.Glencairn.co.uk. "THE OFFICIAL Whisky Glass - The only way to drink Whisky/Whiskey!". Whiskyglass.com. Retrieved 2014-05-20. 

External links

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