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List of locomotive builders

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Title: List of locomotive builders  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Economy of Alberta, Crown Metal Products, Dickson Manufacturing Company, A. E. Goodwin, Golden Rock Railway Workshop
Collection: Lists of Manufacturers, Locomotive Manufacturers, Railway Locomotive-Related Lists
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List of locomotive builders

This is a list of locomotive builders by country, a work in progress including both current and historical builders.

Many locomotive builders changed names multiple times; the attempt is to give the most recognisable name, generally the one used for the longest time or during the company's best known period.

Argentina

Australia

Generally, most locomotives for Australian railways were built from GE/EMD/Alco (United States) components, with the bodies built by Australian companies. Comeng, Clyde Engineering, and Goninan were the most prominent, building hundreds of locomotives for Queensland Rail, RailCorp (as the State Rail Authority), etc. Most of these companies have now merged to form the four listed below.

Active Companies

Defunct Companies

Belgium

Active Companies

Defunct Companies

Brazil

Bulgaria

Express Service Ltd

Canada

Active companies

Defunct companies

Chile

China

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Finland

France

Commercial manufacturers

Railway company workshops

Germany

Active companies

Defunct companies

Greece

Hungary

India

Active Companies

Defunct Companies

Iran

Italy

Active Companies

  • Ipe [35]
  • Valente [36]
  • Ansaldo Breda [37]
  • Firema Trasporti [38]
  • Bombardier Transportation Italy - Vado Ligure
  • Alstom Ferroviaria S.p.A. - Savigliano

Defunct Companies

Japan

Netherlands

New Zealand

The Workshops below were part of New Zealand Railways.

Active

Defunct

Private Companies

Pakistan

Poland

Active companies

Defunct companies

Romania

Russia

Serbia

Slovakia

  • Avokov [52]

South Africa

South Korea

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

Historically, major railways in the United Kingdom built the vast majority of their locomotives. Commercial locomotive builders were called upon when requirements exceeded the railway works' capacity, but these orders were generally to the railways' own designs. British commercial builders concentrated on industrial users, small railway systems, and to a large extent the export market. British-built locomotives were exported around the world, especially to the British Empire. With the almost total disappearance of British industrial railways, the shrinking of the export market and much reduced demand from Britain's railways, few British locomotive builders survive.

Active companies

Defunct companies

See also

United States

Active companies

Defunct companies

In addition to these, many railroads operating steam locomotives built locomotives in their shops. Notable examples include the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Mount Clare Shops, Norfolk and Western's Roanoke Shops, Pennsylvania Railroad's Altoona Works and the Southern Pacific's Sacramento Shops. An estimate of total steam locomotive production in the United States is approximately 175,000 engines, with Baldwin having built nearly 70,000 of these alone.

Uruguay

  • CIR S.A. [99]
    • Servi Piezas [100]

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ Light Railways December 2011, p12
  3. ^ [101]
  4. ^ [102]
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