World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

List of military food topics

Article Id: WHEBN0041917519
Reproduction Date:

Title: List of military food topics  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Lists of prepared foods, United States military chocolate, History of military nutrition in the United States, Meal, Ready-to-Eat, Food
Collection: Lists of Foods, Military Food
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

List of military food topics

This is a list of military food topics. Military food topics include military rations, how military foods are prepared, distributed and utilized.

Contents

  • Military food topics 1
    • A 1.1
    • B 1.2
    • D 1.3
    • F 1.4
    • H 1.5
    • I 1.6
    • L 1.7
    • M 1.8
    • S 1.9
    • T 1.10
    • U 1.11
    • V 1.12
    • W 1.13
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Military food topics

A

A ship's Denmark.

B

D

F

H

A HOOAH! Bar as packaged in Meal, Ready-to-Eat field rations

I

L

M

A Marine Corps-issued A-ration, colloquially known as a "bag nasty." This example contains two breakfast sandwiches, cereal, crackers with peanut butter and jam, a muffin, fresh fruit, and a drink.
U.S. military C-rations
Meal, Ready-to-Eat No. 23 – chicken breast filled with rib meat
Garrison rations are foods that are served to military personnel when they are stationed at a location. This term is mostly used with respect to historic militaries.
Field rations are a canned or pre-packaged meal, easily prepared and eaten, transported by military troops on the battlefield. They are designed for minimal preparation in the field, using canned, pre-cooked or freeze-dried foods, powdered beverage mixes and concentrated food bars, as well as for long shelf life.

S

T

U

V

W

  • George Washington (inventor)

See also

References

  1. ^

External links

  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.