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List of mountains of Italy

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Title: List of mountains of Italy  
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Subject: Mountains of Italy, Italian government debt, List of trade unions in Italy, Trecento, History of Italian culture (1700s)
Collection: Lists of Landforms of Italy, Lists of Mountains by Country, Mountains of Italy
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List of mountains of Italy

This page contains a sortable table listing mountains of Italy that have a topographic prominence of at least 300 m. All mountain heights and prominences on the list are from the largest-scale maps available.[1] In the list, only the exact location of the culminating point of the mountain is considered. Monte Rosa, the second-highest massif in Italy after Mont Blanc, is notably excluded.[Note 1]

Contents

  • List 1
  • Notes 2
  • References 3
  • Sources 4
  • See also 5

List

Rank
Mountain Height
(m) [1]
Drop (m)
[Note 2]
Coordinates[2] Range [Note 3] Range[Note 4] Province First[3]
ascent
1 Mont Blanc / Monte Bianco 4808 4695 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-B Aosta 1786
2 Lyskamm 4527 376 Pennine Alps I/B-09.III-A Aosta 1861
3 Matterhorn / Monte Cervino 4478 1042 Pennine Alps I/B-09.II-A Aosta 1865
4 Grandes Jorasses (Pointe Walker) 4208 843 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-B Aosta 1868
5 Dent d'Hérens 4174 701 Pennine Alps I/B-09.II-A Aosta 1863
6 Breithorn 4164 439 Pennine Alps I/B-09.III-A Aosta 1813
7 Gran Paradiso 4061 1888 Graian Alps I/B-07.IV-A Aosta 1860
8 Piz Zupò 3996 405 Bernina Range II/A-15.III-A Sondrio 1863
9 Grivola 3969 714 Graian Alps I/B-07.IV-A Aosta Valley 1859
10 Aiguille de Tré la Tête 3930 588 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-A Aosta Valley 1864
11 Ortler 3905 1953 Ortler Alps II/C-28.I-A South Tyrol 1804
12 Aiguille de Triolet 3870 301 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-B Aosta 1874
13 Königspitze / Gran Zebrù 3851 424 Ortler Alps II/C-28.I-A S-Tyrol/Sondrio 1854
14 Monviso / Monte Viso / Vísol 3841 2062 Southern Cottian Alps I/A-04.I-C Cuneo 1861
15 Bouquetins 3838 490 Pennine Alps I/B-09.II-A Aosta 1871
16 Mont Dolent 3820 330 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-C Aosta 1864
17 Aiguille des Glaciers 3816 301 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-A Aosta 1878
18 Aiguille Noire de Peuterey 3772 343 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-B Aosta Valley 1877
19 Monte Cevedale 3769 531 Ortler Alps II/C-28.I-A Sondrio/Trentino 1865
20 Aiguille de Leschaux 3759 309 Mont Blanc massif I/B-07.V-B Aosta 1872
21 Aiguille de la Grande Sassière 3747 792 Graian Alps I/B-07.III-A Aosta 1808
22 Weißkugel 3739 569 Ötztal Alps II/A-16.I-A S-Tyrol 1845
23 Mont Vélan 3726 620 Pennine Alps I/B-09.I-B Aosta 1779
24 La Singla 3714 452 Pennine Alps I/B-09.I-C Aosta 1867
25 Torre del Gran San Pietro 3692 377 Graian Alps I/B-07.IV-A Aosta/Turin 1867
26 Monte Disgrazia 3678 1116 Bregaglia Range II/A-15.III-B Sondrio 1862
27 Punta San Matteo 3678 369 Ortler Alps II/C-28.I-A Sondrio/Trentino 1865
28 Uia di Ciamarella 3676 664 Graian Alps I/B-07.I-B Turin 1857
29 Portjengrat: Pizzo d'Andolla 3654 411 Pennine Alps I/B-09.V-B V-C-O 1871
30 Ciarforon 3643 349 Graian Alps I/B-07.IV-A Aosta/Turin 1871
31 Hintere Schwärze [Note 5] 3628 835 Ötztal Alps II/A-16.I-A S-Tyrol 1867
32 Levanna Centrale 3619 525 Graian Alps I/B-07.I-C Turin 1875
33 Grande Rousse/Bec de l'Invergnan 3607 525 Graian Alps I/B-07.III-A Aosta 1874
34 Tsanteleina 3602 490 Graian Alps I/B-07.III-A Aosta 1865
35 Piz Glüschaint 3594 341 Bernina Range II/A-15.III-A Sondrio 1863
36 Bessanèse 3592 386 Graian Alps I/B-07.I-B Turin 1857
37 Mont Brulé 3578 365 Pennine Alps I/B-09.II-A Aosta 1876
38 Croix Rousse/Croce Rossa[Note 6] 3571 499 Graian Alps I/B-07.I-B Turin 1857
39 Monte Emilius 3559 733 Graian Alps I/B-07.IV-C Aosta 1826
40 Presanella 3558 1676 Adamello-Presanella II/C-28.III-B Trentino 1864
41 Aouille Tseuque 3554 345 Pennine Alps I/B-09.I-C Aosta
42 Monte Leone 3553 1144 Lepontine Alps I/B-10.I-A V-C-O 1859
43 Vertainspitze 3545 422 Ortler Alps II/C-28.I-A South Tyrol 1865
44 Adamello 3539 664 Adamello-Presanella II/C-28.III-A Brescia 1864
45 Rocciamelone 3538 310 Graian Alps I/B-07.I-A Turin 1358
46 Mont Gelé 3518 619 Pennine Alps I/B-09.I-C Aosta 1861
47 Weißseespitze 3518 345 Ötztal Alps II/A-16.I-A S-Tyrol 1870
48 Fineilspitze 3514 504 Ötztal Alps II/A-16.I-A S-Tyrol 1865
49 Punta Tersiva 3512 596 Graian Alps I/B-07.IV-C Aosta 1842
50 Hochfeiler 3509 981 Zillertal Alps II/A-17.I-B S-Tyrol 1865
51 Aiguille de Scolette/Pierre Menue 3506 1069 Northen Cottian Alps I/A-04.III-B Turin 1875
52 Becca di Luseney / de Leseney 3504 646 Pennine Alps I/B-09.II-B Aosta 1866

Notes

  1. ^ The Grenzgipfel (4,618 m) being the highest point on the Italian side. Other notable mountains partially in Italy but whose summit are just beyond the border are Piz Bernina, Piz Roseg, Piz Sesvenna and Helsenhorn.
  2. ^ Numbers in italics are estimates because a precise height for the key col is lacking.
  3. ^ For the Eastern Alps the range names are according to the Alpine Club classification of the Eastern Alps.
  4. ^ SOIUSA codes, representing a proposal for a new classification system of the Alps. The codes usually but not always correspond to established ranges. Sorting on this tab puts the mountains in a geographic order, roughly from the southwest to the east.
  5. ^ The key col Hochjoch is 2770 m in the literature and per local indications, but appears at least 20 m higher on the maps.
  6. ^ East summit. West summit is 3,541m. On some maps neighboring Ouile d'Arbéron is higher.

References

  1. ^ a b All mountain heights and prominences are from the following maps:
    For France the 1:25,000 cartes topographiques of the Institut Géographique National
    For Switzerland the 1:25,000 Swisstopo maps.
    For Austria BEV's Österreichische Karte 1:50.000 supplemented with the 1:25,000 Alpine Club maps where available.
    For Italy the 1:25,000 Istituto Geografico Militare maps via the Geoportale Nazionale website.
    Key cols were verified using the SRTM data based contour lines in the terrain view of Google maps.
  2. ^ Verified and fine-tuned via google terrain and satellite maps.
  3. ^ The three main sources for first ascent data are:
    For France and in general; W.A.B. Coolidge, The Alps in nature and history, Methuen & Co, London, 1908.
    For Switzerland; Gottlieb Studer, Über Eis und Schnee: Die höchsten Gipfel der Schweiz und die Geschichte ihrer Besteigung, Volumes 1-3, Schmid & Francke, Bern, 1896-1899.
    For the Eastern Alps: Die Erschließung der Ostalpen, Volumes 1-3, German and Austrian Alpine Club, Berlin, 1894.
    Given are the years for the first recorded ascents. In many cases local people or surveyors made earlier ascents. In particular, chamois and ibex hunters are expected to have reached many summits. Years in italics indicate that it is known that an earlier ascent was made, for example by the presence of artifacts on top or the summit's prior use as a triangulation point.

Sources

  • Jonathan de Ferranti & Eberhard Jurgalski's map-checked ALPS TO R589m and rough, computer-generated EUROPE TO R150m lists [2]
  • Mark Trengrove's lists of several regions of the French Alps, and of the Grand paradiso and Rutor ranges of the Italian Alps

See also

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