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List of wars involving Finland

 

List of wars involving Finland

This is a list of wars involving independent Finland. This list only includes conflicts where Finnish forces took part in actual combat, thus excluding peacekeeping operations.

Conflict Combatant 1 Combatant 2 Result Finnish leaders Finnish losses
President Chief of Defence
Finnish Civil War
(1918)
White Guard
Germany
Red Guard
Soviet-Russia
White Senate victory
  • Russian military presence ceased.
K. J. Ståhlberg
C. G. E. Mannerheim
~30,000[1]
(Reds and Whites)
Winter War
(1939–1940)
 Finland Soviet Union
Kyösti Kallio
25,904[2]
Continuation War
(1941–1944)
 Finland
Germany
Soviet Union Defeat[3] (but survival as an independent state)
Risto Ryti
63,204[4]
Lapland War
(1944–1945)
 Finland Germany Victory
  • German retreat from Finnish territory.
C. G. E. Mannerheim
1,036[5]

For the wars during the Russian rule (1809–1917), see French invasion of Russia (1812), November Uprising (war in Poland in 1830), Russo-Turkish War (several), Russo-Japanese War (1904–05) and World War I (1914–17). For the list of wars during the Swedish rule (1249–1809), see List of Swedish wars. For information on conflicts related to Finland prior to Swedish rule, see Early Finnish wars.

See also

References

  1. ^ National Archive
  2. ^ Finnish detailed death casualties: Dead, buried 16,766; Wounded, died of wounds 3,089; Dead, not buried, later declared as dead 3,503; Missing, declared as dead 1,712; Died as a prisoner of war 20; Other reasons (diseases, accidents, suicides) 677; Unknown 137.
  3. ^ Mouritzen, Hans (1997). External Danger and Democracy: Old Nordic Lessons and New European Challenges. Dartmouth. p. 35.  
  4. ^ Finnish detailed death casualties: Dead, buried 33,565; Wounded, died of wounds 12,820; Dead, not buried later declared as dead 4,251; Missing, declared as dead 3,552; Died as prisoners of war 473; Other reasons (diseases, accidents, suicides) 7,932; Unknown 611
  5. ^ Ahto 1980, p. 296.
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