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Listed buildings in Heysham

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Listed buildings in Heysham

Heysham is an unparished area in Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains 26 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, four are listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, one is at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is mainly occupied by the village of Heysham, with the coast to the west, and the town of Morecambe to the north. The headland overlooking the sea contains some ancient structures that are listed, including a ruined chapel and rock-cut tombs. Most of the other listed buildings are houses, many of them being in the oldest part of the village adjacent to the headland. Elsewhere the listed buildings include a church and associated structures, a public house, and a well.

Key

Grade Criteria[1]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
St Patrick's Chapel
8th or 9th century The ruins of a sandstone chapel, with some restoration using stone tiles. It has a rectangular plan, with walls rising up to 4 metres (13 ft), and others surviving only as foundations. The walls contain a doorway and the jambs of a window. The ruin is a scheduled monument.[2][3] I
Archway,
St Peter's Church
Pre-Conquest This was the original north doorway of the church, and it was moved to its present site in the churchyard in 1864 when the north aisle was added. It is in sandstone, and consists of a single segmental arch with long-and-short jambs and a recess for a doorway. It is set in a short length of wall.[4] II
Rock-cut tombs
Pre-Conquest These consist of two tombs cut into the sandstone rocks, one of which is child-sized. Both tombs contain socket holes.[5][6] I
Rock-cut tombs
Pre-Conquest These consist of six tombs cut into the sandstone rocks Two of them have straight sides, and the others are body-shaped. All the tombs contain socket holes.[5][7] I
Coffin
Medieval The coffin is in the churchyard of St Peter's Church. It was discovered inside the church in 1864, when it contained a skeleton and a chalice. The coffin is in sandstone, it is roughly hewn, and has a recess for a head.[8] II
St Peter's Church
14th century The church contains pre-Conquest remains, it was altered in about 1500, and in the middle of the 19th century, and was restored and a north aisle added in 1864. It is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and consists of a nave and a chancel, both with aisles, and a south porch. On the west gable is a double bellcote.[9][10] I
Old Hall Inn
1598 Originally a house, and later a public house, it was extended in 1898. It is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and consists of a hall and cross-wings, all in one bay. There are two storeys and attics. The main windows are mullioned and transoms, and the attic windows are mullioned with plaques above. On the front is a two-storey porch with a Tudor arched doorway. At the rear is a later extension.[11][12] II*
19 Main Street
17th century A roughcast stone house with a slate roof in two storeys with two bays. Some windows are mullioned and they contain a mixture of sashes and casements. The central doorway has a lintel forming a triangle. Projecting on the left is a single-storey extension that contains a datestone.[13] II
22 Main Street and shop
17th century A roughcast house with a concrete tile roof in one storey with an attic. On the front is a sash window and smaller windows; on the left return is a mullioned attic window. The doorway has a chamfered surround and a battlemented lintel. Attached to the right is a shop.[14] II
Jenny Wren Cottage
17th century (possible A pair of houses that were altered in the 20th century, they are in sandstone with brown tile roofs. The houses have two storeys, and each has a two-bay front with a central doorway. The left house has 20th-century casement windows, and the windows in the right house are sashes.[15] II
1–5 Main Street
1680 This originated as a rectory, it was extended in the 18th century, and later divided into separate dwellings. The building is in sandstone, partly whitewashed and partly roughcast, with a slate roof. The original building has a T-shaped plan, and two storeys. The windows are mullioned, and above the door is a dated lintel. Inside is part of a stone spiral staircase.[5][16] II
Sundial shaft
1696 The sundial shaft is in the churchyard of St Peter's Church, It is in sandstone on a base of two steps. The shaft has a square plan, chamfered to octagonal in the lower part. The square cap is inscribed with the date, and the plate is missing.[17] II
8, 10 and 12 Main Street
1721 (probable) A row of three roughcast houses with a slate roof. They are in two storeys, the central house with two bays, and the others with one. The central house has mullioned windows and a date plaque, and the other houses have casement windows.[18] II
40 Main Street
Early to mid 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, between larger buildings. It has two storeys and one bay. The windows have chamfered surrounds, and the mullions have been removed. The door has a plain stone lintel.[19] II
St Patrick's Well
18th century (possible) The well is set into a wall. It has a recess that is roughly semicircular, above which is a lintel. In front of the recess are two steps.[5][20] II
Royal Hotel and outbuildings
Mid 18th century (probable) A stone public house, partly roughcast and partly painted, with slate roofs. The main part has two storeys, three bays, and mullioned windows. To the right is a former three-storey gabled warehouse containing a loading door. To the right of this is a former barn with a cart entrance and a modern shop front. To the left of the main part is another former farm building.[5][21] II
Manor House
Early 19th century A house and an attached cottage. The house is stuccoed with a slate roof, in two storeys with a symmetrical three-bay front. In the centre is a Tuscan porch, and the windows are sashes. At the rear is a wing, and a cottage that is roughcast; this has two storeys, one bay, and mullioned windows.[5][22] II
Heysham Head House
Early to mid 19th century A sandstone house with an embattled parapet and a hipped slate roof. It has a rectangular plan and two storeys. The east front has three bays. On the front is a single-storey porch with round corner turrets and an embattled parapet. The windows are sashes with Gothick glazing.[5][23] II
Garden walls,
Heysham Head House
Early to mid 19th century The walls are on three sides of a rose garden. They are in sandstone with curved corners. On the west side are three recesses for seats. Opposite the porch of the house are steps flanked by niches.[24] II
Lodge,
Heysham Head House
Early to mid 19th century The lodge is roughcast with sandstone quoins, a hipped roof, and an embattled parapet. It has two storeys and three bays. In the centre is an elliptical archway, and the windows are mullioned with chamfered surrounds and hood moulds.[11][25] II
Walls,
Heysham Head House
Early to mid 19th century The walls are in sandstone, and contain a number of features. These include a Tudor arched gateway, a mullioned window, a flight of stone steps, and niches with statues. The north wall has an arcade of three arches carried on columns with Doric capitals.[26] II
Penhale Court
Mid 19th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with attics, and with a symmetrical front of threebays. In the centre is a Tuscan porch and a doorway with a moulded architrave, and this is flanked by single-storey canted bay windows. The other windows are top-hung casements giving the appearance of sash windows.[27] II
Churchyard wall,
St Peter's Church
Mid 19th century (probable) The sandstone churchyard walls contain some earlier fragments. These include two sets of quoins, a blocked window, and blind arrowslits in Gothic style.[28] II
Carr Garth
Mid to late 19th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with a five-bay front. The windows are mullioned and contain casements, some original and some modern. The doorway has a chamfered surround. At the rear is a parallel range and a projecting wing.[29] II
Wall and gate piers,
Carr Garth
Mid to late 19th century (probable) The walls and gate piers are in sandstone. The walls enclose two sides of the garden and have triangular coping. There are two gate piers in the west wall, they are rusticated, with a square plan, and have pyramidal caps.[30] II
Lodge, Heysham Hall
1870 The lodge is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has a cruciform plan and is in two storeys. Its features include a mullioned window, bay windows, a two-storey porch with a coped parapet, a dated plaque, and gables with ball finials.[31] II

References

Citations

  1. ^ Historic England
  2. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 334–335
  3. ^ Historic England (1208949)
  4. ^ Historic England (1208974)
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 335
  6. ^ Historic England (1207215)
  7. ^ Historic England (1292902)
  8. ^ Historic England (1208980)
  9. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 332–334
  10. ^ Historic England (1279836)
  11. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 336
  12. ^ Historic England (1207212)
  13. ^ Historic England (1207214)
  14. ^ Historic England (1208948)
  15. ^ Historic England (1209491)
  16. ^ Historic England (1208933)
  17. ^ Historic England (1207217)
  18. ^ Historic England (1292896)
  19. ^ Historic England (1279835)
  20. ^ Historic England (1355054)
  21. ^ Historic England (1208942)
  22. ^ Historic England (1207213)
  23. ^ Historic England (1279830)
  24. ^ Historic England (1279831)
  25. ^ Historic England (1207208)
  26. ^ Historic England (1207209)
  27. ^ Historic England (1279838)
  28. ^ Historic England (1207216)
  29. ^ Historic England (1207205)
  30. ^ Historic England (1207206)
  31. ^ Historic England (1209483)

Sources

  • Hartwell, Clare;  
  • Historic England, "Chapel of St Patrick, Heysham (1208949)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Archway approximately 32 metres west-southwest of Parish Church of St Peter, Heysham (1208974)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Rock-cut tombs approx 4 metres southeast of Chapel of St Patrick, Heysham (1207215)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Rock-cut tombs approx 10 metres west of Chapel of St Patrick, Heysham (1292902)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Stone coffin approx 12 metres south of Parish Church of St Peter, Heysham (1208980)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Parish Church of St Peter, Heysham (1279836)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Old Hall Inn, Heysham (1207212)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No. 19 Main Street, Heysham (1207214)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No. 22 Main Street including shop adjoining to south, Heysham (1208948)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Jenny Wren Cottage, Heysham (1209491)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos. 1–5 Main Street, Heysham (1208933)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Sundial shaft approx 18 metres South of Parish Church of St Peter, Heysham (1207217)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos. 8, 10 and 12 Main Street, Heysham (1292896)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No. 40 Main Street, Heysham (1279835)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "St Patrick's Well, Heysham (1355054)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Royal Hotel, including adjoining outbuildings, Heysham (1208942)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Manor House, Heysham (1207213)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Heysham Head House, Heysham (1279830)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Walls on 3 sides of rose garden at Heysham Head, Heysham (1279831)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Lodge to Heysham Head House, Heysham (1207208)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Walls at Heysham Head to south of house, Heysham (1207209)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Penhale Court, Heysham (1279838)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Walling to west of archway in churchyard of Parish Church of St Peter, Heysham (1207216)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Carr Garth, Heysham (1207205)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Wall enclosing 2 sides of garden to North of No 18 Bailey Lane including pair of gate piers, Heysham (1207206)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Lodge, Heysham (1209483)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 May 2015 
  • Historic England, Listed Buildings, retrieved 2 May 2015 
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