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Listed buildings in Lancaster, Lancashire

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Listed buildings in Lancaster, Lancashire

Lancaster is an unparished area in the City of Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains over 330 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, four are listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, 23 are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Lancaster has a long history and this is reflected in its listed buildings. The oldest listed structure is a portion of wall from a Lancaster Canal was built, linking the town with Preston. And in the 19th century railways came to the town, including what is now the West Coast Main Line. During this century some industry, including cotton mills and the manufacture of linoleum, was established but never thrived.[1] There are listed buildings related to all these aspects of the town's history.

Almost all the listed buildings are constructed in local sandstone.[2] and most have slate roofs. A high proportion of the listed buildings are houses, or originated as houses and were converted for other uses, particularly into shops and offices. An architectural practice was established in the town in 1836 by Edmund Sharpe, and continued in existence for over 100 years with a succession of partners, eventually closing as Austin and Paley in 1944;[1] this practice was responsible for designing many buildings in the town, some of which are listed.

This list includes all the listed buildings in the unparished area. In addition to those referred to above, it includes churches and associated structures, public houses, public and civic buildings, hospitals, theatres, banks, schools, and memorials. In addition benefactors to the town created Williamson Park and the Ashton Memorial.

Key

Grade Criteria[3]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Wery Wall
4th century This is an irregular fragment of masonry from a Roman fort, about 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) high built into the edge of a steep slope.[4] II
Lancaster Castle
c. 1150 The castle has been used later as a court house and a prison. The oldest part is the keep, parts of Hadrian's Tower date from about 1200, and the gatehouse dates from about 1400. Towards the end of the 18th century alterations and additions were made by Thomas Harrison and completed by J. M. Gandy. These included a Governor's House, a Crown Court, a Grand Jury room, a new Shire hall, and separate prisons for males and females.[5][6] I
Lancaster Priory
c. 1430 Also known as St Mary's Church, it contains some earlier fabric, the tower was added in 1754–55 by Henry Sephton, and later alterations include the addition of a south porch and north chapel in about 1903 by Austin and Paley. The church is built in sandstone with roofs of slate and lead. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, aisles, a south porch, a north chapel, a west office and refectory, and a west tower. The tower has four stages with buttresses, corner pinnacles, and an embattled parapet. Inside the church are elaborately carved canopies to the choir stalls, and a set of misericords.[7][8] I
Judges' Lodgings
c. 1625 Originally a house, later used as a lodging for judges, and in the 1970s converted into a museum. It is in sandstone, incorporating re-used timbers, it has a slate roof, and is in a U-shaped plan. There are three storeys and a basement, the front having seven bays. The central doorway has a segmental head, Doric columns, a triglyph frieze containing roses, and a carved lion's head above each column. The windows are sashes. In front of the building is a flagged forecourt, steps, gates, gate piers, and railings.[9][10] I
Conservative Club
1637 Originally a house, later used as a club, the oldest part is the rear wing, the rest being remodelled in the early 18th century. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of two ranges parallel to the street. The symmetrical front range has three storeys, a cellar, and five bays. All the windows are sashes with moulded architraves. The doorway, approached up four steps and flanked by railings, has engaged fluted Ionic columns, an entablature with a pulvinated frieze, and a dentilled pediment. The rear range is in four storeys, and contains a two-storey bow window.[11][12] II*
Three columns,
Storey Avenue
c. 1670 The columns are in Tuscan style, they were originally part of the town hall built in 1670, and were relocated here in the 1920s. They are in sandstone and each column is unfluted with an astragal and an abacus.[13][14] II
1 Golgotha, with attached garden walls
Late 17th century A roughcast house with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys with a symmetrical three-bay front. The central doorway has a moulded surround and long-and-short jambs, and the windows are mullioned. In front of the cottage is a sandstone wall, about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high, enclosing the rectangular garden.[15] II
17 and 19 Moor Lane
Late 17th century Originally a house, later used as a shop and office, it is in sandstone with a rendered front and a slate roof. The building has two full storeys and a low third storey. In the ground floor are shop fronts, in the middle floor is a sash window and a casement window, and the top floor has a casement window and a mullioned window.[16] II
Three Mariners Public House
Late 17th century The public house was extended in the 19th century and restored in the 20th century. It is in sandstone with slate roofs. The original part is in three storeys and three bays, with mullioned windows. The extension has two storeys and one bay, and contains sash windows.[17] II
20 Hala Road
1698 A rendered stone house with a slate roof, in three storeys and two bays. The doorway has a moulded surround and a lintel carved with initials and the date. The windows on the front are sashes, and at the rear is a semicircular stair window.[18] II
73 Church Street
c. 1700 A house, later used as an office, in roughcast sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys with cellars, and four bays. The doorway in the fourth bay has a cornice on pilasters, and the windows are sashes. There is a rear wing, and a two-storey bow window.[19] II
22 and 24 Market Street
c. 1700 Originating as a house, and later used as shops and an annexe to a public house, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. The building has three storeys with a cellar, and four bays with a rear wing, giving it an L-shaped plan. In the ground floor are modern shop fronts, and above are replacements of the original windows.[20][21] II
Scale Hall
c. 1700 A small manor house, later used for other purposes, in sandstone with a slate roof. It is in an L-shaped plan, consisting of a main range and a rear wing. There are two storeys, and the main range is symmetrical with five bays. The central doorway is approached up four steps, and has an architrave, a pulvinated frieze and a broken pediment. The windows are sashes with moulded architraves.[22] II
Friends' Meeting House
1708 The meeting house has been subsequently altered and extended. It is in sandstone with a pebbledashed front, and a roof partly of stone-slate, and partly in slate. The building is in one storey with an attic and a two-storey porch with canted sides on the front. There are three bays to the left of the porch and five to the right. The windows are sashes. There is a Venetian window in the east gable wall.[23][24] II*
20 Castle Park
1720 A roughcast sandstone house with a slate roof, in three storeys with cellars and attics, a symmetrical five-bay front, and a square projection at the rear. All the windows have moulded architraves and contain sashes. The central doorway has engaged Ionic columns, a pulvinated frieze, an entablature with dentils, and a segmental open pediment. Above the doorway, between the top storeys, is a datestone.[25][26] II*
Penny's Almshouses and Chapel
1720 Two rows of six almshouses opposite each other, with a chapel at the west end and an arched entrance gateway at the east, all in sandstone, forming a courtyard. The houses are in a single storey, each with one bay, mullioned and transomed windows, and a gable with a ball finial. The chapel has a round-headed doorway, a bellcote, and a shaped gable with a ball finial.[27][28] II*
18 and 18A Castle Park and privy
Early 18th century Originally a coach house and stables, later converted into flats above garages. They are in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and have a front of two storeys and six bays. On the front are two coach house doorways, and two stable doors with a doorway in the left bay and a window in the right bay. In the upper floor are sash windows, two of which are round-headed. At the rear is a brick privy house with stone dressings containing seven privy seats.[25][29] II*
22 Castle Park
Early 18th century A long extension was added to the rear of the house in 1765–66, and it was refronted in about 1800. The house is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has an L-shaped plan. It has three storeys over a cellar, and a two-bay front. The door on the left is approached by five steps, and has a moulded architrave, a pulvinated frieze, a cornice, and a fanlight. The windows are sashes. At the rear is a round-headed stair window with Gothick glazing.[25][30] II*
37–43 China Street
Early 18th century A terrace of three houses, later used as four shops. They are in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys with cellars, with a front of nine bays, and extensions at the rear. In the ground floor are shop fronts, the windows in the middle floor have Tuscan pilasters, and those on the top floor have plain surrounds.[31] II
6 Church Street
Early 18th century Originally a house, later converted into a shop, in rendered sandstone with a slate roof. It has two full storeys and one low storey. In the ground floor is a shop front with an entrance leading to a yard on the left. In the middle floor are two sash windows, and in the top floor here are two fixed windows.[32] II
42 and 44 Church Street
Early 18th century This originated as a house, and was later converted into two shops. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has three storeys, a basement, and three wide bays. In the ground floor are shop fronts, and above are sash windows. Inside many of he rooms have retained their original panelling.[33][34] II*
54 Church Street
Early 18th century Two houses, later converted into a shop, in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys over a cellar at the front, and four storeys at the rear. On the front are four bays with the doorway in the second bay. All the openings have moulded architraves, the windows are sashes, and in the ground floor is a shop front.[35] II
2 Golgotha, with attached garden walls
Early 18th century A roughcast cottage with a composition tiled roof, in two low storeys and two bays. The doorway is in the right bay, and the windows have chamfered surrounds. In front of the cottage is a sandstone wall, about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high, enclosing the rectangular garden.[36] II
59 Market Street
Early 18th century A rendered house with a slate roof, later used as a shop, with three low storeys and a single bay. The ground floor contains a shop front, in the middle floor is a sash window, and the top floor has two casement windows separated by a mullion.[37] II
Blue Anchor Public House
Early 18th century Houses later converted into a public house, in roughcast sandstone and with a slate roof. It has three storeys with cellars, and the west front has three bays. On the front are sash windows, and at the rear the windows are mullioned.[38] II
Gate piers, Scale Hall (east)
Early 18th century A pair of gate piers in rusticated sandstone ashlar. Each pier is about 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in) square and 3 metres (9.8 ft) high. They have a chamfered plinth, a moulded cornice, and a low moulded pyramidal top.[39] II
Gate piers, Scale Hall (southwest)
Early 18th century A pair of gate piers in rusticated sandstone ashlar. Each pier is about 0.6 metres (2 ft 0 in) square and 3 metres (9.8 ft) high, and has a chamfered plinth, a moulded cornice, and a rounded top.[40] II
Stonewell Tavern
Early 18th century Originally two houses, later combined into one public house. The older house is on the right, it has two low rendered storeys with a tile roof. The ground floor is occupied by a large three-light window, with a small casement window above. The house on the left dates from the early 19th century, it is in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys with a basement, and with two bays. The doorway is approached by six steps, and the windows are of different types.[41] II
Music room
c. 1730 This originated as a summer house, it was restored in the 1970s, and then used as a shop and a flat. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has three storeys, three bays, and a balustraded parapet. The bays are divided by pilasters, fluted Ionic on the ground floor, fluted Corinthian in the middle floor, and panelled in the top floor. In the ground floor is a central round-headed archway, now glazed, flanked by doorways with architraves. The windows are sashes, the window above the archway having a swan-neck pediment and a central urn. Inside is richly decorated plasterwork.[42][43] II*
15 and 17 Castle Hill
1739 A pair of cottages, later partly converted into a museum. They are in sandstone with a stone-slate] roof, in two low storeys and with a front of three bays. There are paired doorways with lintels, one of which is inscribed with initials and the date. The windows are sashes of varying sizes. At the rear is a well.[25][44] II
2 Castle Hill
Mid-18th century Originally a house, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys, five bays on the front, and three on the side. All the openings have plain surrounds, the central doorway is approached by five steps, and the windows are sashes. At the rear is a stair window.[45] II
3 Castle Hill
Mid-18th century A house, later used for other purposes, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar, and a front of three bays. The doorway is in the right bay and is approached by two steps. The windows have plain surrounds, and contain 20th-century top-hung casements.[46] II
6–12 Castle Hill
Mid-18th century A former warehouse and three cottages, the cottages dating from the early 19th century. They are in sandstone, the cottages with a stone-slate roof and the warehouse with a tiled roof. The cottages have three storeys, and each has a single bay. The former warehouse has been converted into domestic use, it is gabled, in three storeys with an attic, and has a central glazed loading slot.[47] II
7 Castle Hill
Mid-18th century A house, later converted into flats, in sandstone with a stone-slate roof. It has three storeys, an attic, a cellar, and a four-bay front. All the openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes. In the attic is a dormer.[48] II
29 Castle Hill
Mid-18th century Originally a warehouse, later extended and converted for other uses, it is in sandstone with slate roofs. The original part has a symmetrical gabled front in three storeys, with two loading slots and a steel crane between them. To the right is a two-storey extension with two timber-framed gables on the right return, one containing an oriel window, and to the right of this is a further single-storey extension.[25][49] II
8 Castle Park
Mid-18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof that was raised by a storey in 1854. It has three storeys and a cellar, a front of two wide bays, and an extension to the rear. All the openings have moulded architraves. The doorway has a fanlight with decorative glazing, and the windows are sashes.[50] II
10, 12 and 14 Castle Park
Mid-18th century A row of three sandstone houses with slate roofs in two storeys with cellars and attics. The row has a front of ten bays, Nos 10 and 12 having three bays, and No 14 four, the right bay containing a wagon entrance. All the openings have moulded architraves, the windows are sashes, and the doors have fanlights. Each house has a low hipped dormer.[25][51] II
16 Castle Park
Mid-18th century Originally two houses, later used as offices. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has a T-shaped plan. There are three storeys above a cellar, and a front of six bays. The openings have moulded architraves, and the windows are sashes. The doorway in the third bay is approached by six steps with railings, and has a fanlight. At the rear is a two-storey bow window and an extension.[25][52] II
Garden wall,
18 and 18A Castle Park
Mid-18th century The garden wall runs south and forms the boundary to No 16 Castle Park. It is mainly in brick, with some sandstone, and is about 3 metres (9.8 ft) high.[53] II
Gate piers, steps and wall,
20 and 22 Castle Park
Mid-18th century These form part of the retaining wall of terraced gardens, and are in sandstone. The gate piers are square and have pilasters on all faces, and large cornices. On top of the eastern pier is an urn. There are steps leading up to the piers, and beyond them. The flanking walls are about 4 metres (13 ft) high and extend about 20 metres (66 ft) to the west and 15 metres (49 ft) to the east.[54] II
7 Chapel Street
Mid-18th century Originally a house, later used as a shop, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has an L-shaped plan, three storeys over a cellar, and three bays with the remains of a rear wing. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above are sash windows.[55] II
9 Chapel Street
Mid-18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof. later used as a shop. It has an L-shaped plan, three storeys over a cellar, and three bays, with a rear wing and the remains of a rear extension. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above are sash windows.[56] II
46 and 48 Church Street
Mid-18th century Two houses, later converted into one shop, in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys over cellars, and four bays with a rear extension. In the ground floor is a shop front with glazed doors, and above the windows are 20th-century sashes.[57] II
10 Greaves Drive
Mid-18th century A pair of houses in sandstone with slate roofs in two storeys. The main house has three bays, and to the right is a lower wing of two bays. All the windows are 20th-century casements.[58] II
15 King Street
Mid-18th century Originally a warehouse, later a shop, it is in sandstone on a corner site. There are three storeys, three wide bays on King Street, two narrow bays on Old Sir John's Arcade, and a canted bay on the corner. In the ground floor is a shop front. On King Street is a central loading slot, the windows in the upper floors are mullioned; those on Old Sir John's Arcade are sashes.[59][60] II
40 and 42 King Street
Mid-18th century A house later converted into a shop and flats, in sandstone with a composition tile roof. It has three storeys, a cellar, and four bays. In the centre is a doorway with an architrave, a pulvinated frieze, and a segmental pediment. The windows are sashes, and at the rear is a large elliptical-arched stair window.[61] II
48 and 50 King Street
Mid-18th century Two houses, later a shop and a house, in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys and cellars, each with two bays. No 50 has a shop front in the ground floor. The doorway of no 48 has an architrave with pilasters ending in scrolled consoles supporting brackets carved as lion-masks, and a moulded cornice. The windows are sashes.[62] II
10 and 12 Market Street
Mid-18th century A house, later converted into a shop, in rendered sandstone with some brick, and with a slate roof. It has three storeys with cellars and four bays. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above the windows are sashes.[63] II
23 Market Street,
3 Marketgate
Mid-18th century Originally a house, later altered and used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has three storeys. The Market Street face has four bays, with shop fronts on the ground floor. The Marketgate face has nine bays, with blocked shop fronts and a doorcase with Tuscan pilasters on the ground floor. Most of the windows are sashes.[64] II
31 Market Street
Mid-18th century A house, later used as a shop, in rendered stone with a slate roof, with three storeys and three bays. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above are sash windows with architraves.[65] II
44–50 Market Street
Mid-18th century A terrace of four houses, later used as shops and offices, in sandstone with slate roofs. They have three storeys, cellars, and each former house has a three-bay front. In the ground floor are shop fronts, and above most windows are sashes.[66] II
8 New Street
Mid-18th century A house, later used as a shop, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar, three bays, and a rear extension. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above are sash windows with projecting surrounds and triple keystones.[67][68] II
12 New Street
Mid-18th century Originally a warehouse, later used as an office, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are four storeys and a cellar. Slightly to the right of centre is a loading slot, with a plate glass window in each floor. On each side is a bay, and there is a 20th-century shop front in the ground floor.[67][69] II
16, 18 and 20 New Street
Mid-18th century Originally two houses and a warehouse, they have been converted into shops. The warehouse had four storeys; it now has a shop front on the ground floor, and the former loading bay has been glazed. To the left, the houses have three storeys, with shop fronts on the ground floor, and sash windows above.[67][70] II
26 New Street
Mid-18th century A house, later used as a shop, and substantially rebuilt in about 1987. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys and three bays. There is a 20th-century shop front in the ground floor and sash windows above.[71] II
47 North Road
Mid-18th century A sandstone warehouse with a composition tile roof, in three storeys and with one bay facing the street. On the front the ground floor contains a doorway and a large entrance, above which are sash windows. The loading slot is in the left wall, and to the right is a lean-to extension.[72] II
Abbott's Stained Glass Workshop
Mid-18th century This originated as a house, with a warehouse added at the rear later in the 18th century, and was later used as a shop and a workshop. It is in sandstone with slate roofs. The shop has an L-shaped plan, in three storeys over cellars, and a three-bay front. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above are sash windows. The workshop has a rectangular plan, also with three storeys over cellars, and fronts of three and five bays.[73] II
Becontree House
Mid-18th century Originally a house, later converted into a shop and a dwelling, it is in sandstone with a tiled roof. There are three storeys with a cellar and an attic, and a four-bay front. At the right end is an altered doorway. The window have architraves; those in the ground floor have been altered, and the first floor windows they are sashes.[74] II
Brunton's Warehouse (southeastern part)
Mid-18th century Originally a warehouse, it was converted into flats in about 1980. The building is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has four storeys and a cellar. There are chamfered quoins, and a central loading slot to which balconies have been added on each floor. The windows have plain surrounds and modern glazing.[75] II
Gate piers,
Friends' Meeting House
Mid-18th century The pair of gate piers is at the entrance to the churchyard, and they are in sandstone. Each has a square plan, a pilaster on the sides, a cornice, and a pyramidal cap.[76] II
Laburnum Cottage and store
Mid-18th century Originally a farmhouse and stable, later used has a house and a store, it is in sandstone, mostly painted, with a Westmorland slate roof. The house is in two storeys, and consists of a central two-bay part, with a lower single bay, set back on each side, that on the right being the former stable. The main part has sash windows, the left wing has casement windows, and the right wing includes a fixed window, a wagon entrance and, at the rear, a loft doorway approached by external steps.[77] II
Malthouse
Mid-18th century The malt house is in stone with an asbestos sheet roof, and has a rectangular plan. Internally it has three full storeys, a basement and an attic, and 13 bays. The external lintels are in stone, and the internal lintels are in timber, shown by dendrology to have originated in Poland.[78] II
Peel House
Mid-18th century Originally a warehouse, it was converted into flats in 1980. The building is in sandstone and has a slate roof. It is about 15 metres (49 ft) deep with a gabled face to the road of about 6 metres (20 ft) wide. There are four storeys with an attic and a cellar, and a front of two bays. The glazing is modern, and on the left side is a loading slot, also glazed.[79] II
Ring o' Bells Public House
Mid-18th century The public house is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has three storeys with cellars, and a four-bay front. In the second bay is a doorcase with fluted Doric engaged columns, a triglyph frieze with carved military trophies between the triglyphs, and a segmental pediment. There is a door in the fourth bay with a plain surround and a fanlight. The windows on the front are sashes. At the rear is an extension with mullioned windows.[20][80] II*
Tonnage Warehouse
Mid-18th century The warehouse is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has four storeys and a cellar, is about 15 metres (49 ft) deep, and about 6 metres (20 ft) wide on its gabled front. All the openings have plain surrounds. There is a central loading slot, a doorway on the left approached by steps, and sash windows.[81] II
Warehouse on corner of Duke Street
Mid-18th century The warehouse was converted into flats in 1994, and is in sandstone with a slate roof and a gable facing the road. It has four storeys with a cellar, and a three-bay front with a central loading slot, now glazed. Flanking this are windows, and in the left bay is a doorway and a crane. There is another loading slot in the left return.[82] II
Warehouse Number 3
Mid-18th century A sandstone warehouse with a slate roof with a gable facing the road, in four storeys above a cellar. The building is about 15 metres (49 ft) deep and has a face about 6 metres (20 ft) wide. In the centre is a loading slot flanked by windows and a doorway. All the openings have plain surrounds.[1][83] II
Quay Wall
1750–55 The wall on St George's Quay was built for the Lancaster Port Commission. It is in sandstone with bull-nose coping, and stretches for about 400 metres (1,300 ft). A the southeast end are two slipways and raised parapet walls.[84][85] II
St John's Church
1754–55 The tower was added to the church in 1784 by Thomas Harrison. It is now redundant and under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. The church is in sandstone with a slate roof, and consists of a nave with a semicircular apse, a south porch, and a west tower]. The tower has three stages. In the bottom stage are lunette windows, a rectangular window, and doorways. The middle stage contains clock faces on three sides, and in the top stage are bell openings with Tuscan pilasters and pediments. On top of the tower is a rotunda with engaged Tuscan columns carrying a curved entablature with a triglyph frieze surmounted by a drum with a spirelet.[86][87] II*
Assembly Rooms
1759 Built as assembly rooms to raise money for Penny's Hospital, and later extended and used for other purposes, it is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. It has two tall storeys, and five bays. In the centre is a semicircular Tuscan porch approached by three semicircular steps. In the fifth bay is a doorway with a fanlight. The windows are sashes.[59][88] II
1 and 3 Cable Street
1760 A pair of houses, later altered and used for other purposes, by Richard Gillow. They are in sandstone with a slate roof, and with some brick used in the rear wing. The houses have three storeys above a cellar, an eight-bay front that contains a wagon entrance, and a long two-storey rear wing. The two doorways are combined and share a Doric pediment with a triglyph frieze on engaged columns. The windows have moulded architraves with triple keystones, and contain sashes.[89][90] II
25 St George's Quay
c. 1760 A sandstone house with a tiled roof, in three storeys with a cellar, and three bays. All the openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes. At the rear are two round-headed windows with Gothick glazing.[91] II
Warehouse on corner of Elm Street
c. 1760 The warehouse was converted into flats in about 1986. It is in sandstone, rendered on the side, and with a gabled slate roof. There are three storeys and a cellar, and central loading slot with a balcony on each floor. All the openings have plain surrounds.[92] II
Maritime Museum
1763–64 Originally the custom house, designed by Richard Gillow, it ceased to have this function from 1882, and in 1985 was converted into a maritime museum. The building is in sandstone, partly rendered, and with a hipped slate roof. It has one high storey over a rusticated basement, and a symmetrical façade of five bays. On the front is a portico with four monolithic Ionic columns, four corresponding pilasters behind, and an entablature with a modillion cornice. The windows are sashes and have architraves with pediments.[93][94] II*
24 Castle Park and wall
1767 A house that became the offices of the architectural firm Paley and Austin from 1871 to 1945, and was later converted into flats. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys with a cellar, and has a symmetrical five-bay front. All the openings have moulded architraves, the windows being sashes. The doorway has three steps and a fanlight, and at the front of the house is a forecourt with a wall and railings. At the rear is a stair window and a French window.[25][95] II
New Inn public house
c. 1767 The public house is in sandstone with a slate roof. The left part has three storeys and one bay, and the right part has four storeys, cellars, and two bays. On the front are windows of varying types and an inscribed plaque.[96] II
5 Cable Street
c. 1770 A house, altered in the 19th century, and later used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has an L-shaped plan. There are three storeys and a cellar, and a front of five bays. The central doorway is approached by four steps; it has engaged Tuscan columns carrying a pediment with a frieze. The windows have moulded architraves and contain sashes.[97] II
1 Castle Hill
1770 Originally a warehouse and workshop, it was damaged by fire in 1985 and converted into flats. The building is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and has an L-shaped plan. There are three storeys, and a central loading slot that is flanked by windows. The ground floor windows have tracery forming lozenges and Gothick heads; the upper floor windows are divided into small panes. To the right of the loading slot are the brackets of a former crane.[98][99] II
1 Queen Square
1772–73 The house was designed by Richard Gillow, and has later been used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has two storeys with cellars. There is a symmetrical five-bay front with a cornice and a parapet. The central doorway is approached up six steps, and it has an architrave, a pediment, and a fanlight. The windows are sashes.[84][100] II
United Reformed Church
1772–73 Originally an Independent, then a Congregational Church, it was doubled in size in 1833 with an extension at the rear at right angles. The church is in sandstone and a slate roof. The symmetrical west façade has two storeys and five bays. The windows in the upper storey have round heads, keystones, and impost blocks, and on the front is a datestone. Inside the church is a gallery on three sides and box pews.[101][102] II
78 and 80 Church Street
1772–75 A house. later divided into two houses, and then used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof.. There are three storeys with a cellar, and the main part has a front of five bays. The central bay projects forward as a bow, and contains a door flanked by windows, and three windows in the upper floor, all of which are curved. The windows are sashes, and the doorway has engaged Doric columns, a triglyph frieze, and a pediment. At the rear is a Venetian window, and a Diocletian window.[103][104] II*
Back entrance,
Storey Institute
1770s This was originally the frontispiece of Cawthorne House; it was reduced in size and moved to its present site in about 1906. It is in sandstone and consists of a Roman Doric portico carrying a triglyph frieze, two cornices, and a pediment. The portico contains decorative wrought iron gates and screens.[105][106] II
1–5 Aldcliffe Village
Late 18th century A row of five cottages in sandstone, roughcast at the front and rendered at the rear, and with slate roofs. All the cottages have two storeys, and they contain windows of varying types.[107] II
1A Castle Hill
Late 18th century A house, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys over a basement and a front of three bays. The doorway in the right bay has a moulded architrave, an inscribed frieze, and a cornice on fluted consoles. The windows are sashes with plain surrounds.[89][108] II
9 Castle Hill
Late 18th century A sandstone house, partly rendered, with a composition tiled roof. It has three storeys over a high basement, and three bays with an eaves cornice. The doorway to the left is approached by a flight of six steps, with railings, and the basement door to the right of it is also approached by steps. The windows are sashes.[109] II
23 Castle Hill
Late 18th century Originally a house, then the studio of the stained glass makers Shrigley and Hunt, and used later for other purposes. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys, with a cellar, a later attic, a front of three bays, and a long rear extension. In the ground floor is a wagon entrance, and two large rectangular windows with decorated wooden architraves and stained glass panels. The upper floor contain sash windows, and the attic has a continuous studio window.[25][110] II
4 Castle Park
Late 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, in three storeys with a cellar, three bays, and a rear extension. The openings have plain surrounds, the doorway in the right bay has a moulded cornice, and the windows are sashes.[111] II
6 Castle Park
Late 18th century The house is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, in three storeys above a cellar, and with a single-bay front. The doorway, with a fanlight, is to the left. The windows are sashes, one in the ground floor, and two in each upper floor.[112] II
57–61 Church Street
Late 18th century Originally two houses, they were later converted into an extension to a bank. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys and two wide bays. Along the ground floor is a shop front in the form of a colonnade with six timber columns. The windows in the upper floors are sashes.[113] II
98 Church Street
Late 18th century A sandstone cottage with a stone-slate roof in two low storeys with a cellar and two bays. All the openings have plain surrounds. In the first bay are two doorways, one leading to the yard and the other into the house, and the windows are sashes.[114] II
100 Church Street
Late 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof in three storeys with a cellar and a front of three bays. The windows have moulded architraves and containsashes. The doorway has a moulded architrave, a cornice carried on fluted consoles, and a fanlight containing stained glass.[103][115] II
34–38 King Street
Late 18th century A row of three houses, later used for other purposes. They are in sandstone with a slate roof, and have three storeys with a high basement, and each house has three bays. The central house contains a modern shop front. The doorways are approached by a flight of six steps with railings. There are also railings surrounding the basement area of No 38. Most of the windows are sashes.[116] II
87 King Street
Late 18th century A house, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with cellars, and a three-bay canted front with a single-storey extension at the rear. The door and windows in the ground floor are modern replacements, and there are ventilators over the cellar openings. In the upper floor are sash windows.[117] II
89 King Street
Late 18th century A house, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar and attic, and a three-bay front. The doorway is approached by two steps, and has a cornice. To the left is a low wide lobby entrance, and to the right is a blocked cellar opening. The windows are sashes, and in the roof is a flat-roofed dormer.[118] II
91 King Street
Late 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, later used as a restaurant, with three storeys, a cellar, and a three-bay front. In the left bay is a tall doorway, with a shop front to the right. The windows are sashes.[119] II
95 and 97 King Street
Late 18th century A pair of houses, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have three storeys and a symmetrical six-bay front. The central two bays are occupied by a carriage entrance flanked by blocked doorways, all under a large lintel. All the opening have plain surrounds, and the windows in the upper two floors are sashes. At the rear is a three-stage stair window.[120] II
66 Market Street
Late 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, later used as a shop, in three storeys and three bays. In the ground floor is a shop front, and there is a doorway to the right with a plain surround. The windows are 20th-century casements.[121] II
11 Moor Lane
Late 18th century Originally a house, later used as a shop and office, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys and four bays. There is a yard entrance in the first bay. In the ground floor are modern shop fronts, and above there are sash windows with architraves.[122] II
4 New Street
Late 18th century A rendered house with a slate roof, later used as a shop, with three storeys and one bay. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above are sash windows.[123] II
6 New Street
Late 18th century A house, later altered and used for other purposes, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar, three bays, and a short rear extension. In the ground floor is a 20th-century shop front and a doorway with a fanlight. Above, the windows are sashes.[124] II
14 New Street
Late 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, later used as a shop, in three storeys and three bays. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above the windows are sashes.[125] II
22 New Street
Late 18th century A house, later used as a restaurant, in rendered sandstone with a slate roof, It has three storeys, two bays, and a rear extension. The ground floor contains a shop front, and above the windows are sashes.[126] II
24 New Street
Late 18th century The house was later used as a shop and offices, and is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys and a cellar, three bays, and a rear extension. In the ground floor is a shop front, and to the right is a doorcase with timber Doric columns. Most of the windows in the upper floors are sashes.[127] II
2 Queen Square
Late 18th century A house later used for other purposes, in sandstone, partly rendered, and a slate roof, with two storeys and cellars. Originally with five bays, it was partly demolished, leaving the right two bays, and there is a rear wing. The doorway has been re-sited in the rear wing, and has three steps with railings, and a cornice on consoles. The windows are sashes.[84][128] II
3 and 5 Queen Square
Late 18th century A pair of sandstone houses with a slate roof, in two storeys and with a symmetrical three-bay front. The doorways are in the outer bays, and have plain surrounds and fanlights. Inside the doorways are paired sash windows with mullions, in the centre is a blind panel, and the upper floor contains sash windows. On the right side is a gabled loading slot.[129] II
4 Queen Square
Late 18th century A house, later used as offices, in sandstone with slate roofs. It has two storeys with attics and cellars, a long extension at the rear, and a symmetrical front of four bays. At the top is a wide moulded pediment containing a Diocletian window with Gothick tracery. The first two bays contain a square bay window, and in the third bay is a doorcase with engaged Tuscan columns and a triangular pediment. Most of the windows are sashes, and at the rear is a Venetian window and another Diocletian window.[84][130] II
1 Queen Street
Late 18th century A house, later used as offices, in sandstone, partly rendered, with a slate roof. It has two storeys and a front of five bays. Both of the outer two bays contain a single-storey canted bay window. The windows are sashes. The doorway is on the right side and has an elliptical arch with a keystone, and a fanlight.[131] II
1B Queen Street
Late 18th century This originated as the coach house to No 1 Queen Street, and was later used as an office. It is in sandstone with sides partly rendered, and with a slate roof. It has a rectangular plan at right angles to the street, with two storeys. The gabled front facing the street contains the former entrance to the coach house, with a segmental arch, and a casement window above. In the gable is a blocked owl hole, and to the left is a single-storey extension.[132] II
4 and 6 Queen Street
Late 18th century A house later used as an office, in sandstone with a slate roof, in two storeys with cellars. The main part of the building has a symmetrical five-bay front, and there is an additional bay to the left. The doorway is approached up steps with railings, it has a cornice on fluted consoles, and the windows are sashes. In the left bay is a two-storey canted bay window, and on the left return there are two blocked lunettes.[133] II
5 and 7 Queen Street
Late 18th century A pair of houses, later used for other purpose, with a front of rusticated chamfered sandstone, and a slate roof. There are three storeys above a high basement, and three bays. The doorways are paired in the centre, and are approached from the sides by nine steps with railings. The doorcases have fluted pilasters, and share a swan-neck pediment. The windows are sashes.[84][134] II
12 Queen Street
Late 18th century A house, later used as an annexe to a school, it is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. It has two storeys with cellars, and a symmetrical front of two bays and a single-storey extension to the right. The windows are sashes, and the doorway is in the extension.[135] II
20 and 22 Queen Street
Late 18th century A pair of sandstone houses, with a slate roof, in three storeys with a basement, and in four bays. The windows have plain surrounds, and contain sashes. The doorways, each with a fanlight, are paired in the centre, and share an open pediment carried on fluted brackets, and are flanked by pilasters.[136] II
23 St George's Quay
Late 18th century A house damaged by subsidence, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar, and two narrow bays. The doorway, which is approached by four steps, and the windows, which are 20th-century casements, have plain surrounds. In the ground floor is a blocked cellar opening, and a trap door.[137] II
29–33 St George's Quay
Late 18th century A row of five sandstone houses with slate roofs. They have three storeys, attics and cellars, and each house has a front of two bay. All the openings have plain surrounds, and the doorways are approached by three steps. The windows are a mix of sashes and casements.[138] II
35 St George's Quay
Late 18th century A sandstone warehouse with a slate roof in five storeys with a gable facing the road. It has a rectangular plan, and a central loading slot. The lading slot and the other openings have plain surrounds.[2][139] II
36 and 37 St George's Quay
Late 18th century Three sandstone gabled warehouses in three storeys, each with a central loading slot. By the 1970s they were disused.[3][140] II
108 and 110 St Leonard's Gate
Late 18th century A mirrored pair of sandstone houses with a slate roof, in three storeys and cellars, each house Having a front of three bays. In the centre the doorways share a doorcase with three engaged Tuscan columns, a triglyph frieze, and a triangular pediment. The windows are a mix of sashes and 20th-century casements. The doorways are approached by steps with railings.[141][142] II
112 and 114 St Leonard's Gate
Late 18th century A mirrored pair of sandstone houses with a slate roof, in three storeys and cellars, and a front of six bays. The central two bays project forward under a moulded pediment. The doorways are in the outer bays, they are approached by steps with railings, and have engaged Tuscan columns, an open pediment, and an elliptical fanlight with Gothick tracery.[84][143] II
129 and 131 St Leonard's Gate
Late 18th century Originally a pair of houses, later converted into shops, in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys, and each shop has one wide bay. In the ground floor the entrances are in the centre, and are flanked by shop fronts. The windows have plain surrounds and contain sashes.[144] II
10–20 Sun Street
Late 18th century A terrace of six house, arranged in pairs. They are in sandstone with a slate roof, and have three storeys with cellars. Each house has a single-bay front, and each pair has the doorways in the centre. Alterations include the insertion of s shop front, bow windows and balconies. The other windows vary in type.[145] II
22 and 24 Sun Street
Late 18th century A pair of sandstone houses with a slate roof. They have three storeys over cellars, and each house has a single bay. The openings have plain surrounds, the doors are paired in the centre, and most of the windows are sashes.[146] II
25 Sun Street
Late 18th century Originally a coach house, later part of a works, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys, three bays, and a rear extension. In the ground floor are two blocked and partly glazed arched openings, and a narrow doorway to the right.[147] II
1 Water Street
Late 18th century A house that was restored and converted into flats in about 1985, it is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. There are three storeys over a basement and a symmetrical front of five bays. Five curved steps with railings lead up to the central doorway, which is treated as a Venetian window, with side lights. The doorway has Tuscan pilasters, an open pediment, and a round-headed fanlight with Gothick glazing. The windows are sashes, and on the left side are three bays.[148] II
Brown Cow Public House
Late 18th century Originally a pair of houses, one of which has been used later as a shop and the other as a public house. They are in sandstone with a slate roof, and have three storeys with cellars. Each former house has two bays. There is a shop front in the ground floor, and the windows are sashes.[149] II
Church House
Late 18th century A house on a sloping site, later used for other purposes, in sandstone with a slate roof, it has three storeys, a basement, and four bays. In the ground floor is a carriage entrance. All the windows are sashes with moulded architraves. At the rear is a canted bay window.[103][150] II
Crown Inn
Late 18th century This was a pair of houses, later converted into a public house. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, with three storeys over cellars, and four bays. There are paired doorways in the centre, and most of the windows are 20th-century casements.[4][151] II
George and Dragon Public House
Late 18th century Originally a house, later used as a public house, it is in rendered stone with a slate roof. It has three storeys over cellars, and a front of two bays. In the ground floor is a recessed timber canted bay window and a doorway with a plain surround approached by three steps. The windows in the upper floors are 20th-century casements.[152] II
High Street Cottage
Late 18th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, in a rectangular plan. It has two storeys with an attic, and two bays, and is in Gothick style. The house has chamfered quoins, a cornice on brackets, and an embattled parapet. On the front is a doorway with a four-centred arch that is flanked by sash windows, and with a hood mould and a stair window above.[59][153] II
93 High Street
Late 18th century Originally a house, then a public house, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys, with cellars and attics, and three bays. The doorway has a plain surround with a segmental pediment, and there are two recessed leading up to the door. The windows are sashes, and there is a gabled dormer.[5][154] II
The Bobbin
Late 18th century This originated as a house, and a public house was added on the corner site to the right in about 1900, the house being incorporated into the public house. They are in sandstone with slate roofs. The former house has two storeys and a cellar, and a three-bay front. The addition has two storeys, and attic and a cellar, with three bays on Chapel Street, two on Cable Street, and a curved bay between.[155] II
Lunecliffe Hall
Late 18th century A small country house, later used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of a main block with extensions to the rear, including a service wing. The main front has two storeys, an attic, cellars, and a symmetrical three-bay front. The central bay is pedimented, and has a semicircular porch with four Tuscan columns, a frieze, a cornice, and a round-headed door with a fanlight. The windows are sashes.[156] II
Rawlinson Memorial
Late 18th century The memorial is in the churchyard of St Mary's Church. It is in limestone and has a square plan. On the sides are panels with inscribed marble plaques and triangular pediments. On the top is a marble urn on a pedestal. The monument stands on sandstone flags and is surrounded by cast iron railings.[157] II
Slip Inn
Late 18th century A roughcast stone public house with a slate roof, that has been extended to the rear. The main block has three storeys with cellars, and a three-bay front. The doorway is in the left bay. To the left is a lower two-storey five-bay wing. The windows are sashes.[158] II
Sundial
Late 18th century The sundial is in the churchyard of St Mary's Church. It is in sandstone and in Gothick style. The sundial has a square plan and stands on a stepped base. The shaft is decorated with panels, and the base of the dial has quatrefoils. The bronze plate and gnomon have been removed for safe keeping.[159] II
Three warehouses,
St George's Quay
Late 18th century The warehouses were converted in about 1987 to act as offices and an annexe to the Maritime Museum. They are in sandstone with slate roofs. They are in five storeys, and each warehouse has three bays with a central loading slot flanked by windows. There are two gables, one containing a blind Diocletian window.[84][160] II
Tramway Hotel
Late 18th century Originally a house, then used as a hotel, the building is in sandstone, partly rendered with slate] roofs. There are three storeys with cellars, and a five-bay front. The central doorway is recessed and approached by four steps, and the windows are sashes. All the openings have plain surrounds.[161] II
Gate piers and wall,
United Reformed Church
Late 18th century The churchyard wall and gate piers are in sandstone. The piers are square and rusticated with moulded bases and cornices. The railings and gates are in iron, and between the piers is an overthrow.[162] II
Victoria Corn Mill
Late 18th century The mill was converted into warehouses, and then into flats; it is in sandstone with slate roofs. The gabled main block has paired central four-storey loading slots flanked by three-storey bays with sash windows. To the right is a gabled three-storey two-bay extension, and to the left is a 20th-century two-storey extension.[84][163] II
Wagon and Horses Public House
Late 18th century Originally three houses and a warehouse, later used as a public house. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has three storeys, and a cellar. The public house has five bays, with the former warehouse to the left. All the openings have raised surrounds, and the windows are casements. The former warehouse has a wide opening on the ground floor and altered windows.[164] II
2 High Street
c. 1775 A house later divided into flats, in sandstone with a slate roof, in two storeys with a basement. It has a front of four bays and an eaves cornice with a balustrade. The left bay contains a wagon entrance, now converted into a door, and to the right is a three-step mounting block. The windows are sashes.[165] II
4 High Street and railings
c. 1775 A house in sandstone with a slate roof, in two storeys with an attic and a basement. There are five bays with an eaves cornice and a balustrade. Above the central three bays is a gable containing a Diocletian window. The other windows have moulded architraves, and contain sashes. The central doorway has engaged Tuscan columns, and an open pediment containing a fanlight with Gothick tracery. The railings enclosing the basement areas are included in the listing.[166][167] II
6 High Street
c. 1775 A sandstone house, originally a vicarage, with a slate roof, in two storeys with cellars and attics. It has three bays, with a 19th-century single-storey extension to the left. In the right bay is a wagon entrance with a doorway on its left return. At the top of the house is a cornice with a balustrade; some balusters have been replaced by two dormers. The windows are sashes with moulded architraves.[59][168] II
Highmount House and attached railings
1777 The house has been divided into flats. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in an L-shaped plan. The house consists of a main block with a basement, and a front of five bays, a rear extension, and an extension to the left of two storeys and two bays. Five steps lead up tp the central doorway in the main block; the doorway has an open pediment on consoles. The windows are sashes. In front of the basement area and in front of the extension are railings that are included in the listing.[59][169] II
65 Church Street
c. 1780 Originally a house, later used for other purposes, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has an L-shaped plan, with a main range and a rear wing, in three storeys with cellars, and has a three-bay front. Three steps lead up to the doorway in the left bay, which has pilaster jambs, an open pediment on fluted consoles, and a fanlight. The windows are sashes.[6][170] II
City Museum
1781–83 This was originally the town hall, and has been a museum since 1923. The cupola was designed by Thomas Harrison, and there were alterations during the 19th century. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has two storeys above a basement. The principal face has five bays, a portico with four Tuscan columns, and a Doric entablature including a triglyph frieze. The cupola is octagonal with a square base, a clock face, a rotunda of Ionic columns, a drum, and a dome.[171][172] II*
Grand Theatre
1782 The oldest theatre in the town, it was acquired in 1843 by Edmund Sharpe and altered, the interior was redesigned in 1897 by Frank Matcham, and it was rebuilt after a fire in 1908. The theatre is in rendered sandstone with a slate roof, and has a north front of three storeys and four bays. Inside is a gallery, a proscenium arch, and decoration in Free Renaissance style.[173][174] II
19 Castle Hill
1785 Originally a dispensary, later used as an office, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are two storeys with a cellar, a three-bay front, and a single-storey extension at the rear. The central doorway, approached by two steps, has engaged Tuscan columns, and an open pediment, and above it is a square niche. The windows are sashes, and at the top of the building is s fluted frieze, and a moulded pediment with ball finials.[25][175] II
14 Penny Street
c. 1785 This was originally a house, later used as a shop. in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys and a single wide bay. A shop front has been inserted into the ground floor, with a passage to the rear on the left. The windows in the upper floors are paired.[176] II
38–42 Parliament Street
c. 1787 This originated as a toll house for Skerton Bridge and an inn designed by Thomas Harrison. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and forms a symmetrical structure facing the axis of the bridge. In the centre is the toll house in two storeys and three bays flanked by screen walls leading to two-storey three-bay pavilions with pedimented gables. In the centre of the toll house is a pedimented doorway, and in the upper storey are sash windows and paired engaged Ionic columns, a frieze, and a dentilled cornice.[177][178] II*
Skerton Bridge
1788 The bridge carries the A6 road over the River Lune. It was designed by Thomas Harrison, and is in sandstone. The bridge consists of five shallow semi-elliptical arches with semicircular cutwaters, above which are niches with pediments and engaged Tuscan columns. The parapet has panels alternating with groups of balusters. It was the first major public bridge in England to have a flat deck. The bridge is also a scheduled monument.[179][180][181] II*
Greycourt
c. 1792 A sandstone house on a steeply sloping site, with a slate roof. It has three storeys over a deep basement, and three wide bays. All the windows are sashes with moulded architraves, and most have cornices. In the right bay of the basement is a former carriage entrance. The doorway is in the left bay, and is approached by steps leading to a terrace with railings.[173][182] II
Summer house
1792 The summer house is in the garden of Greycourt. It is in sandstone with a slate roof and has an octagonal plan. There are two storeys above a cellar. There are sash windows and a doorway. On the top is an octagonal chimney cap. Inside is a cantilevered stone staircase and a barrel vault in the cellar.[173][183] II
Duke's Theatre
1795–76 This was originally St Anne's Church, and was converted into a theatre in 1970. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has five bays on the south and west fronts. The west front is gabled with a bellcote. There are two tiers of windows, the upper tier having round heads, and the main doorway has a cornice hood on consoles.[184][185] II
Haverbreaks Bridge (No.95)
c. 1797 The bridge carries Haverbreaks Road over the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone, and consists of a single slightly deformed semi-elliptical arch with voussoirs, and a parapet with plain copings. On the south side is an iron pipe.[186] II
Basin Bridge (No.98)
c. 1797 A roving bridge over the Lancaster Canal, in sandstone and concave in plan. It consists of a single semi-elliptical arch with a triple keystone, and parapets with rounded coping.[187] II
Dolphinlee Bridge (No.105)
c. 1797 An accommodation bridge over the Lancaster Canal, it is in sandstone, and has a single semi-elliptical arch with a triple keystone, a parapet with rounded coping and rectangular terminals.[188] II
Halton Road Bridge
(No. 108)
1797 The bridge carries Halton Road over the Lancaster Canal. It is in gritstone and consists of a single arch with alternate blocked voussoirs. The bridge has a solid parapet and a rounded coping.[189] II
Beaumont Hall Bridge (No.109)
1797 The bridge carries Green Lane over the Lancaster Canal; it is in sandstone and concave in plan. The bridge has a single semi-elliptical arch with a triple keystone, a parapet with rounded coping and rectangular terminals.[190] II
Hammerton Hall Bridge (No.111)
1797 The bridge carries Hammerton Hall Lane over the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone, and has a concave plan. The bridge has a single semi-elliptical arch with a triple keystone, a parapet with rounded coping and rectangular terminals.[191] II
Newton Beck Culvert
c. 1797 The culvert carries Newton Beck under the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and consists of a circular tube about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter and about 40 metres (130 ft) long. There is a portal at each end with pilasters and curved abutments. The bed of the stream is paved with setts.[192] II
Palatine Hall
1798 Originally the first Roman Catholic church in the town, with a presbytery to the left, later converted and used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with slate roofs. The former church has three storeys and cellars, and a six-bay front on Fryer Street containing a Venetian window and three round-headed windows. On the entrance front is a porch added in 1859 with Tuscan pilasters, an inscribed frieze, and a moulded cornice. The former presbytery has a doorway with a cornice on consoles.[193][194] II
8 and 9 Dalton Square
c. 1798–99 A pair of houses, later used for other purposes, in sandstone with slate roofs. They have three storeys over cellars, and each house has a three-bay front. The doorways are paired in the centre, and each has Tuscan pilasters, a fluted frieze, an open segmental pediment, and a fanlight. All the windows are sashes.[166][195] II
1 Dalton Square
c. 1799 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in three storeys with a cellar, and two bays. Above the doorway and the ground floor window is a cornice on four consoles. Over the door is a fanlight, and the upper floor windows are sashes.[196] II
Pebble forecourt,
Castle Park
Late 18th or early 19th century (possible) The forecourt is in front of Nos 18, 18A, 20 and 22 Castle Park, from the front of the buildings to the edge of the pavement. It consists of rounded pebbles set on edge, some of which are arranged in a chequerboard pattern.[197] II*
21 Castle Hill
c. 1800 A house, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar, and three bays under an eaves cornice. The recessed doorway is approached by two steps, and has a moulded cornice carried on fluted consoles, and a fanlight with decorative glazing. The windows are sashes.[198] II
67 Church Street
c. 1800 Originally a house, later used as offices, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys above a cellar, a three-bay front, and a long extension at the rear. The openings have plain surrounds, above the doorway is a cornice, and the windows are sashes.[199] II
17 and 18 Dalton Square
c. 1800 A pair of houses, later used as shops, in sandstone with slate roofs. They have three storeys with cellars, and each shop has two bays and a rear extension. The doorways are paired in the centre and are flanked by shop fronts. Above, the windows are of varying types.[200] II
1 Great John Street,
2 Moor Lane
c. 1800 A house on a corner site, later used as a club, in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys, a basement and an attic. The main front is on Great John Street, with three bays and a broad pediment containing lunettes. The central entrance is approached by a double flight of steps with railings, and the doorway has a semi-elliptical arch and an open pediment on consoles. Flanking the doorway are Venetian windows, and the other windows are sashes. There are three bays on Moor Lane, the left bay having a timber fascia and inserted modern windows.[166][201] II
13 Great John Street
c. 1800 A sandstone house with a slate roof on a corner site, in three storeys with a basement, and a front of three bays on Great John Street and one bay on Dalton Square. The central entrance is approached by six steps with railings, and the doorway has a cornice on fluted consoles. The windows are sashes.[202] II
3–5 Golgotha, with attached garden walls
c. 1800 A row of three sandstone cottages, two of which are rendered, with a composition tile roof. They have two storeys at the front and three at the rear, and each cottage has one bay. There is one vertical-rectangular window in each floor, most of which contain top-hung casements. In front of the cottages are a sandstone walls, about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high, enclosing the rectangular gardens.[203] II
7–10 Golgotha
c. 1800 A row of four sandstone cottages with a slate roof, in three storeys. Each cottage has a front of one bay with a doorway to the right and one window to each floor, most of which are modern casements.[204] II
99 King Street
c. 1800 Originally a coach house, later used as an office, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are two storeys, two unequal bays, and a rear extension. The first bay contains a former wagon entrance, now glazed, with a semi-elliptical arch and a keystoned architrave. To the right is a square-headed doorway, and the windows above are casements.[205] II
26 Market Street
c. 1800 A house on a corner site, later used as a shop. It is rendered with a hipped slate roof. There are three storeys and fronts of two and three bays. On the ground floor are shop fronts, and above are 20th-century casement windows.[206] II
53 and 53A Market Street
c. 1800 Two sandstone shops with a slate roof, in three storeys and four bays. In the ground floor are 20th-century shop fronts, with remains of an earlier timber front, including fluted Doric columns. In the upper floors are sash windows.[207] II
19 and 21 New Street
c. 1800 Originally two houses, alter converted into a shop, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys and four bays. In the ground floor are 20th-century shop fronts with older Tuscan pilasters. In the upper floors are sash windows.[208] II
23 New Street
c. 1800 A house later used as a shop, in sandstone with a roof mainly slated. There are three storeys and three bays. In the ground floor is a shop front and above are sash windows.[209] II
28 New Street
c. 1800 A house, later used as a shop, in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys and a cellar. The building is in a single bay, and has deep quoins. There is a 20th-century shop front, and in the upper storeys are three-light windows that are mullioned and contain sashes.[210] II
3 Queen Street
c. 1800 A house, later divided into flats, in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys and a basement, with three bays with a long rear extension. The doorway is approached by four steps with railings, and has a cornice. The windows are sashes, those in the ground floor having three lights and mullions.[211] II
14 Queen Street
c. 1800 A sandstone house with a slate roof, later used as offices. It has three storeys, cellars, three bays, and a rear extension. The doorway has a cornice on consoles, and a fanlight, and the windows are sashes.[212] II
21 and 22 St George's Quay
c. 1800 A pair of sandstone houses with a slate roof, in three storeys with a cellar. Each house has a one-bay front, and the whole has a symmetrical façade, with a central cellar door. The windows are 20th-century casements.[213] II
34 St George's Quay
c. 1800 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in three storeys with cellars and attic, and with a two-bay front. The windows are sashes, and there are two attic dormers. The doorway, to the left, is approached up five steps, and there is a cellar opening below the right window.[214] II
13, 15 and 17 Sun Street
c. 1800 A terrace of three houses in sandstone with slate roofs. They have three storeys and cellars with rear extensions, and each house is in one bay. Most of the windows are sashes.[215] II
19 and 21 Sun Street
c. 1800 A pair of small houses, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have three storeys with cellars, and each house has one bay and a rear extension. The windows and doors have plain surrounds. The doorways are paired in the centre, the windows of No 21 are sashes and those in No 19 are 20th-century casements.[216] II
26 and 28 Sun Street
c. 1800 A pair of houses, later converted into shops, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have four storeys with cellars, a front of five bays, and linked extensions to the rear. The paired entrances are in the second bay, and above the doorways is a wide pediment on consoles. The fifth bay contains a wagon entrance, and the windows are sashes.[217] II
31, 33 and 35 Sun Street
c. 1800 A row of three houses, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have three storeys with cellars and an attic, and three bays facing west and one bay facing south under a pedimented gable. The doorways have fanlights, and each has a cornice carried on plain consoles. The windows are sashes.[218] II
6 Golgotha, with attached garden walls
1800 A sandstone house with a slate roof, it has three storeys at the front and two storeys at the rear, and s front of one bay. The doorway is on the right, and has a large lintel running to the left over a blocked opening. The windows are casements. The walls surrounding the front garden, about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high, are included in the listing.[219] II
Blacksmith's shop
1800 This was built in sandstone with a slate roof for the Lancaster Canal Company and consists of a blacksmith's shop and a dwelling above. There is a stable to the left, and a single-storey workshop at the rear. The main part has a rectangular plan, in two storeys with three bays on each front. There is a central doorway in the upper floor approached by a flight of stone steps.[220] II
Five posts, Castle Park
c. 1800 The posts mark the boundary of Castle Park. They are in sandstone and 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high. Each post is octagonal, slightly tapering, on a moulded base, and with a flattish top. Some have retained their cast iron ball finials.[221] II
Outhouses, Golgotha
1800 A row of outhouses in sandstone with stone-slate roofs. They are in a long rectangular plan, behind a row of cottages. They are in a single storey, with plain doorways and small square windows.[222] II
Mill Hall
1800 Originally a steam-powered factory, it closed in 1975, and was converted into student accommodation in 1988–89. The building is in sandstone with a slate roof, in five main storeys with a basement and an attic, and long fronts of ten bays. Features include the cap of a ventilation shaft at the apex of the south gable, a truncated chimney stack, a gabled round-arched loading door in the centre of the west front, and a non-functional iron external fire escape.[223] II
Royal Hotel and Owen House
1800 This originated as a house, with a public house added in about 1900, and the building has since been used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with slate roofs. The original house has three storeys, a basement, and three bays, and the public house has three storeys and two bays. The windows are sashes.[7][224] II
Warehouse,
Bridget Street
1800 The warehouse was converted into flats in 1994. It is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof. There are four storeys over cellars, and a central loading slot under a gable and flanked by windows. Four steps with railings lead up to a central doorway.[225] II
5 Dalton Square
1801–09 A house later used as offices in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three tall storeys, a cellar, three bays, and a rear extension. The doorway in the left bay is reached by four steps with railings, and has an Ionic doorcase with a pediment. All the windows are sashes.[166][226] II
Bath House
1803 The bath house was designed by Joseph Gandy and paid for by public subscription; it was extended in the 19th century, and has been converted for domestic use. The house is in sandstone with a concrete tiled roof, and is in two storeys. The original entry was at the rear, which has three bays, the entrance is covered by the extension. The front facing Bath Street has two bays, and the windows are 20th-century casements. The stone-lined bath is still in situ beneath the floor.[227][228] II
Blocks 40, 41, 42, 44 and 46, Moor Hospital
1811–16 This was the county lunatic asylum, designed by Thomas Standen, and later extended. It was closed in the 1990s, partly demolished, and the original part converted into flats. The building is in sandstone with slate roofs, and has a U-shaped plan. There is a central five-bay block flanked by five-bay wings. Projecting at right angles to the north from the ends of these are eleven-bay wings. The central block has two storeys a basement and an attic, and the middle three bays form a pedimented portico with Tuscan columns and a Doric entablature with a triglyph frieze.[229][230] II*
Former National School
1820 Originally a girls' school. later used as a house and warehouse. It is in sandstone with a slate roof in two low storeys. There are three bays on High Street under a pedimented gable carrying an inscription, and eight bays on Cawthorne Street. Most of the windows are sashes.[59][231] II
4 Fenton Street
Before 1821 The house is in sandstone with a slate roof, has three storeys with a cellar, and two bays with a plinth and a moulded cornice. The doorway in the right bay is approached by three steps with railings containing shoe scrapers, and has a fanlight and a cornice on consoles. The windows are 20th-century casements.[232] II
6 Fenton Street
Before 1821 A sandstone house with a slate roof, later converted into flats. It has three storeys with a cellar, and two bays with a plinth and a moulded cornice. Three steps with railings lead up to a doorway with a fanlight and a cornice on consoles. The windows are sashes.[233] II
3 Dalton Square
1824 A house later used as a club, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a cellar, and is in three bays. In front of the central doorway is a porch with Tuscan columns, above which is a wrought iron balustrade. The porch is flanked by canted bay windows and the other windows are sashes.[166][234] II
Royal Bank of Scotland
c. 1824 Originally the Amicable Society Library, later used as a bank and offices. The building is in sandstone with a slate roof on a corner site. There are two storeys with cellars, and three bays on each front, with a canted bay on the corner. The doorway is in the corner bay, and the windows are sashes.[33][235] II
18, 18A, 20 and 20A Brock Street
Early 19th century Two houses, later converted into shops and flats, in sandstone with a slate roof, and with a T-shaped plan. There are three storeys with cellars, three bays, and a rear central extension. In the ground floor are shop fronts. The openings have plain surrounds, the doorways are paired in the centre, approached by seven stone steps, and the windows are sashes.[236] II
25 Brock Street
Early 19th century A house on a corner site, later used as offices, in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. It is in three storeys with three bays on Brock Street and two bays on Dalton Square. The doorway is in the centre of the Brock Street face, it is approached by three steps, and has a cornice on consoles. In the ground floor are modern shop fronts, and above most of the windows are 20th-century casements.[237] II
2 Bryer Street
Early 19th century Originally a pair of cottages, later combined into one house, it is sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys above a cellar, and a three-bay front. In the central bay are paired doorways, one of which is blocked. All the openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes.[238] II
2 Castle Park and railings
Early 19th century A house, later used as a school and then converted into flats, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys with a basement, a five-bay front, a two-storey service wing to the left, and a semi-octagonal projection to the rear. The windows are sashes, and the doorway, approached by three steps, has a moulded architrave, a cornice, and a fanlight. There are railings and a low wall in front of the basement area.[25][239] II
26 Castle Park
Early 19th century This originated as a service wing to No 24 Castle Park, it is in sandstone, and has a hipped slate roof. The building has two storeys and one bay, with a doorway on the left. The openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes.[240] II
22 and 24 Church Street
Early 19th century Originally two houses, later converted into one shop, it is in sandstone with a slate roof. There are shop fronts in the ground floor, and mainly sash window]]s above.[241] II
69 and 71 Church Street
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later used as offices, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have three storeys, cellars, and a three-bay front]. The coupled doorways are in the centre, they are recessed, and have three pilaster jambs, a frieze, a cornice, and fanlights. The windows are sashes.[242] II
11 and 12 Dalton Square
Early 19th century Originally a pair of houses, later used as shops. They are in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys, each shop having two bays. In the centre are paired doorways approached by two stops, and with fanlights, These are flanked by shop fronts, and most of the windows above are sashes.[243] II
15 and 16 Dalton Square
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later used for other purposes, in sandstone with s slate roof. They have three storeys with cellars, and each house is in two bays with rear wings. No 16 has a shop front in the ground floor; No 15 has retained its original doorway, which is approached by two steps, and has a plain surround and a fanlight. Most of the windows are sashes.[244] II
19 and 20 Dalton Square
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later altered and used as shops, in sandstone with s slate roof. They have three storeys with cellars, and each shop is in two bays with rear wings. The ground floor of No 19 contains a shop front: No 20 has retained its original doorway with a tripartite window to the left. Most of the windows are sashes, mainly modern replacements.[245] II
21 Dalton Square
Early 19th century A sandstone house with a hipped slate roof, standing on a corner site and later used for other purposes. There are three storeys over a cellar, and fronts of one and three bays. In the ground floor is a shop front, and above the windows have been altered.[246] II
7–11 Friar Street
Early 19th century A row of three sandstone houses with a slate roof, in three storeys over cellars, each house having one bay. All the openings have plain surrounds, the doorways to Nos 7 and 9 are paired, and the windows are sashes. On the front of No 7 is a plaque stating that it was the birthplace of Sir William Turner.[247] II
5 and 7 Great John Street
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later used as shops and flats. in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys and a basement, and a front of three bays. The doorways are between the bays and are approached by steps; each has a moulded cornice. The windows have three lights with mullions, and contain sashes.[248] II
4–6 Hillside
Early 19th century A row of three sandstone houses with a slate roof, in three storeys with cellars. No 4 has a front of three bays, and the other houses have two bays. The doorways have timber porches and plain surrounds. On the front are two bay windows, and most of the other windows are sashes.[249] II
7 King Street
Early 19th century A sandstone shop with a slate roof, in three storeys and two bays. The left bay of the ground floor contains a wagon entrance with a deep lintel, and to the right is a doorway and a window. The windows in the middle floor are sashes, and those in the top floor are fixed.[250] II
52 and 54 Market Street
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later used as shops, in sandstone with slate roofs. They have three storeys and cellars, and each shop has a two-bay front. In the ground floor are shop fronts, and above are three-light windows with mullions and sashes.[251] II
54A, 56 and 58 Market Street
Early 19th century A row of three houses later used as shops, in sandstone with slate roofs, with three storeys above cellars. In the ground floor are shop fronts, and above each shop is a three-light window with mullions and sashes.[252] II
61 Market Street
Early 19th century Originally a house, later used as a shop, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys and three bays. The ground floor is occupied by a shop front and a yard entrance, and above are sash windows.[253] II
21 and 21A Queen Street
Early 19th century A house, later converted into flats, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and a front of two bays. The doorway is approached from the left by four steps, with railings, and has a cornice and a fanlight. The windows are 20th-century casements.[254] II
23, 23A, 23B and 23C Queen Street
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later converted into flats, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have two storeys with basements, and a front of three bays. The central bay contains the paired doorways, which are approached by five steps at the front and sides. The doorways have chamfered jambs and fanlights containing glazing forming a lozenge pattern. The windows are 20th-century casements.[255] II
25, 27 and 27A Queen Street
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later converted into flats, in sandstone with a slate roof. They have three storeys with basements, and a front of four bays under an eaves cornice. Three steps lead up to the doorways that are paired in the centre; these have a cornice on panelled consoles. The windows are modern sashes.[256] II
29 Queen Street
Early 19th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, in three storeys with a basement, and two bays. The doorway is approached up three steps, it has a console on panelled consoles, and the windows are 20th-century casements.[257] II
4–10 Sulyard Street
Early 19th century A terrace of four houses, in two pairs. They are in sandstone with slate roofs. The houses have three storeys with cellars, and each pair has a three-bay front. The central bays contain a pair of doorways with cornices on plain corbels, and fanlights. The windows are of mixed types.[258] II
Bowerham House
Early 19th century A sandstone house with a hipped slate roof, in two storeys with a symmetrical west front of three bays. The central doorway has a timber porch and Tuscan pilasters and a cornice. The windows are sashes.[259] II
Dacrelands
Early 19th century Originally two houses, later used for other purposes, the building is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof in two storeys. The entrance front contains paired doorways with three unfluted Greek Doric columns and a plain entablature, with a two-storey bay window to the right. The west front has a central bow window.[260][261] II
John o' Gaunt public house
Early 19th century A house, later used as a shop and public house, in sandstone with a slate roof. There are three storeys and three bays. In the ground floor are a shop front and a recessed public house front with a bow window. The windows above are mostly sashes.[262] II
Skerton Liberal Club
Early 19th century A house, later used as a club, in sandstone with slate roofs that was extended in the later 19th century. The original part, in Neoclassical style, has three storeys and a symmetrical three-bay front. The central Ionic porch has two columns and two pilasters carrying an entablature with a cornice. The extension is in one bay, and all the windows are sashes.[263] II
Mill 1, Moor Lane Mills South
1826 Originally a steam-powered mill, it was converted into offices in 1989–90. The building is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. The main block has an L-shaped plan, and is in five storeys, with fronts of thirteen and ten bays. In the angle is a cast iron water tank on a brick tower. To the north is an attached range of one- and two-storey buildings.[264] II
Lodge, Aldcliffe Hall
1827 The lodge to the demolished hall is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in Elizabethan style, It has a single storey, and two bays with a one-bay extension to the right. Features include two pairs of octagonal chimneys, a cross window with decorative glazing, and a datestone.[265] II
4 Dalton Square and railings
c. 1830 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in three storeys with a basement, and with two bays and a rear wing. The doorway in the right bay is approached up six steps with railings, and has a pediment on fluted consoles. The windows are sashes, and there are railings in front of the basement area.[166][266] II
Trades Hall
c. 1830 A house later used for other purposes, in sandstone with a slate roof. It has two storeys, a basement, five bays, a plinth, and a moulded cornice. The doorway is approached up three steps, and has a moulded architrave with pilasters, and a cornice on fluted consoles. The windows are modern casements. At the rear is a full-height canted bay window.[267] II
Boathouse
c. 1833 The boathouse and workshop stand at right angles to the Lancaster Canal. The building has a rectangular plan, splayed at the canal end, in two storeys and seven bays. Between the storeys are 13 slots for the insertion of beams.[268] II
St Luke's Church
1833 The church is in sandstone with a slate roof, and consists of a nave with aisles, a north vestry, and a west tower. The tower is in three stages and has a west doorway, diagonal buttresses, corner pinnacles, and an embattled parapet. The windows are lancets.[269][270] II
Ryelands House
1836 A large house, later used as a welfare centre, it was enlarged in 1883 by Paley and Austin. It is in sandstone with hipped slate roofs, and is in Neoclassical style. The house has an L-shaped plan, and is in two storeys with a three-storey tower at the north end of the wing. The entrance front of the main block is symmetrical with three bays, and a central Doric porch with four columns and a pediment. The south front has five bays, and most of the windows are sashes.[260][271] II
Ryelands Lodge
c. 1837 The lodge is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof, and in Neoclassical style. It has a single storey and a symmetrical three-bay front. There is a central porch with pilasters, a plain frieze, and a pediment, and this is flanked by sash windows with architraves.[260][272] II
25 Castle Hill
c. 1840 Built as the residence of the prison governor, the house is in sandstone, rendered at the front, with a slate roof. It has two storeys and a three-bay front. The doorway is approached up three steps, and has timber pilasters, a decorated lintel, and a cornice protected by lead flashing with scalloped edges. The windows are sashes with margin lights.[25][273] II
2 Dallas Road
c. 1840 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with a cellar, and with a symmetrical three-bay front. The central bay protrudes slightly, and there are pilasters at the ends. The central doorway is approached by two steps, and has a cornice on consoles. The windows have plain surrounds and contain sashes.[274] II
10 and 12 Middle Street
c. 1840 A pair of sandstone houses with slate roofs, in three storeys over cellars, each with a front of two wide bays. Each house has a central doorway with a plain surround and a cornice. The windows contain 20th-century sashes.[275] II
Nurses' Home
1840 This originated as a railway station and offices by Edwin Gwyther, being the Penny Street terminus of the Lancaster and Preston Junction Railway. It is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof, and has two storeys and five bays. The central bay projects forward under a pediment. On the front is a porch with pairs of Ionic columns and a plain entablature. The windows are sashes.[276] II
St Thomas' Church
1840–41 The church was designed by Edmund Sharpe in Early English style, and the chancel and steeple were added in 1852–53 by E. G. Paley. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of a nave, aisles, a chancel, a west narthex, and a northeast steeple. The steeple consists of a two-stage tower with a stair turret, it becomes octagonal above the level of the aisle roof, and has an octagonal spire with two tiers of lucarnes, a finial and a cross.[193][277] II
Gates, walls and railings,
St Thomas' Church
1840–41 Designed by Edmund Sharpe, the gate piers and churchyard walls are in sandstone. There are four octagonal gate piers, each with a pyramidal spirelet, two of which has a finial and the other two have lamps. The gates and railings are in cast iron.[193][278] II
Greaves Park
1843 Originally a large villa, subsequently enlarged and used as a school, and then a public house. It is in Tudor style with two storeys and attics, and has an H-shaped plan. The garden front is symmetrical with five bays, the central three bays being recessed, and the outer bays forming cross-wings. The windows are mullioned, and most also have transoms. The wings have two-storey canted bay windows, and there are attic dormers and an oriel window.[279][280] II
WRVS offices
1844 A sandstone house with a hipped slate roof, in two storeys, with a symmetrical three-bay front. The central doorway has Tuscan pilasters, with sunken panels, a cornice, and a frieze. The windows are sashes with architraves.[281] II
Railway station
1846 The railway station was designed by William Tite for the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway Company in Tudor Revival style, and later extended. It is in sandstone with slate roofs. The original building has two storeys and five bays, the outer bays being cross-wings. Ten bays were added to the right in 1852, followed by outbuildings to the left in about 1900. At the extreme right is a three-storey tower with a pyramidal roof. The platform is canopied, and a footbridge leads to an island platform.[179][282] II
Former vicarage
1848 The vicarage was built for Lancaster Priory, and has later been used as offices. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and in Elizabethan style. The building has two storeys, attics and cellars, and a front of five irregular bays. There are two parallel ranges, two cross-wings, and a single-bay extension to the right. The entrance has a Tudor arched doorway above which is a shield with a coat of arms and a carved bas-relief, and the windows are mullioned and transomed.[84][283] II
Walls and gateway,
Roman Catholic cemetery
1849–50 Designed by E. G. Paley, the walls surrounding three sides of the cemetery and the gateway are in sandstone. The north and east walls have triangular coping. The west wall has rounded coping and contains the gateway, which has two gables and pointed arches. The gates are in timber and iron.[284] II
Windermere House
1849–50 A girls' charity school, built to replace a Bluecoat school, and designed by Sharpe and Paley in Elizabethan style, it has later been used as offices. The building is in sandstone with slate roofs, and has two storeys, and five slightly irregular bays, each containing a gabled dormer. The doorway is in the second bay, and above it is a niche with the figures of two girls and an inscription. The windows are mullioned or mullioned and transomed.[179][285] II
17 New Street
Mid-19th century A sandstone shop with a slate roof in three storeys and one bay. In the ground floor is a shop window, and above the windows are 20th-century casements.[286] II
1–9 St Mary's Parade
Mid-19th century A row of five sandstone houses with slate roofs, in three storeys and five bays. The openings have plain surrounds, the windows being sashes, and the doorways have cornice hoods.[287] II
15 and 19 St Mary's Parade
Mid-19th century Originally a row of four houses, later converted into two dwellings, they are in sandstone with a slate roof. The houses have three storeys above a basement, and share a symmetrical front of four bays. The doorways were paired with a cornice hood above, but the left doorway in each house has been blocked. The windows are sashes.[288] II
21–29 St Mary's Parade
Mid-19th century A row of five sandstone houses, later incorporating a shop, with slate roofs. They have three storeys and cellars, and each house is in one bay. All the openings have plain surrounds, the first-floor windows are sashes, and the others are fixed.[289] II
Monument in churchyard
Mid-19th century The monument is in the churchyard of Lancaster Priory. It consists of a rectangular sandstone tomb chest with clasping pilasters on which is a marble effigy of a half-reclining woman. The inscription is illegible.[290][291] II
1–9 High Street
c. 1850 A terrace of five sandstone houses with slate roofs, in three storeys with cellars. Each house has a doorway with a simple cornice to the right, and a window in each floor. The doors and windows have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes.[292] II
Royal Grammar School (Old School)
1851 The oldest part of the present school was designed by Sharpe and Paley, and extensions were added later in the century by Paley and Austin. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, The main block has two storeys with attics and a basement, and an asymmetrical front of seven bays, with a tower at the left end. There is a four-bay extension to the right and the headmaster's house behind the tower. The main front is gabled, the fifth bay is wider and contains the entrance. This has a doorway with a moulded arch and a hood mould, and above it is an ornate niche containing a statue of Queen Victoria.[293][294] II
Barracks, White Cross
1854 The barracks were converted into offices in about 1983. They are in Scottish baronial style, built in sandstone with a slate roof and in two storeys. The front is symmetrical with five recessed bays under a parapet. This is flanked by cross-wings in two storeys with attics, crow-stepped gables with finials, and corner turrets with conical roofs and finials. The windows are mullioned and contain casements.[295][296] II
Eastern Chapel,
Lancaster Cemetery
1854–55 The Nonconformist mortuary chapel, designed by E. G. Paley, is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in Gothic Revival style. It has a cruciform plan. Most of the windows are lancets, and there is a wheel window in the east gable. The main gable apex has a cross finial, and there is a poppy head finial on the porch.[297][298] II
Northern Chapel,
Lancaster Cemetery
1854–55 The Roman Catholic mortuary chapel, designed by E. G. Paley, is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in Gothic Revival style. It has a rectangular plan with a gabled projection to the north and a gabled porch to the south. The windows are lancets, and there is a cross finial on the east gable.[297][299] II
Western Chapel,
Lancaster Cemetery
1854–55 The Anglican mortuary chapel, designed by E. G. Paley, is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in Gothic Revival style. It has a cruciform plan. Most of the windows are lancets, and there is a wheel window in the west gable. The main gable apex has a cross finial, and there is a poppy head finial on the porch.[297][300] II
Cemetery Lodge
1855 The lodge was designed by E. G. Paley in Gothic Revival style, and is in sandstone with slate roofs. It is in a T-shaped plan consisting of a range of one storey, and a cross-wing of two storeys, both with attics. There is a canted bay window containing mullioned and transomed windows with trefoil heads; other windows have arched heads and plate tracery.[297][301] II
Christ Church
1855–57 The church was designed by Henry Martin, and subsequent additions and alterations were made by Paley and Austin and their successors in the practice. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of a nave with a baptistry, north and south porches, a chancel, a south aisle and south chapel, and a north transept and vestry. At the west end are twin turrets with square bases broaching to octagons, and surmounted by spirelets.[302][303] II
Lancaster Cathedral
1857–59 The Roman Catholic cathedral originated as a parish church designed by E. G. Paley in Gothic Revival style, and was extended later. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, except for the baptistry, which has a copper roof. The cathedral consists of a nave with aisles and transepts, a chancel with aisles, a semi-octagonal apse and chapels, an octagonal baptistry attached to the north transept, and a northwest steeple. The steeple has a four-stage tower, a stair turret, and a spire, containing three tiers of lucarnes, and rising to a height of 73 metres (240 ft).[304][305] II*
Cathedral House
1857–59 The presbytery for Lancaster Cathedral was designed by E. G. Paley in Gothic Revival style, and extended in 1895–96 by Austin and Paley. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and has two storeys with gables. The original range has a two-storey canted bay window. The extension is at right angles and there is a two-storey turret in the angle. The windows are mullioned and some also have transoms.[306][307] II
Crimea Memorial
1860 The war memorial in Lancaster Cemetery was designed by E. G. Paley to commemorate those who lost their lives in the Crimean War. It is in carboniferous limestone, and consists of an obelisk on three steps, a square plinth, and a tapering shaft on a square base. At the top of each face of the plinth is a pediment, and on its sides are inscriptions.[297][308] II
Entrance gateway,
Ripley St Thomas School
c. 1860 The gateway is in sandstone, and consists of four piers, two of which flank the central driveway, and the other two the pedestrian entrances. Each pedestrian entrance is through a pointed archway with steep gables and fleur-de-lys finials. The piers have octagonal caps surmounted by poppyhead finials. The gates are in wrought iron.[309] II
32 Parliament Street
1863 A marble works by E. G. Paley, later used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof, in three storeys with a cellar, and has a symmetrical front of five bays. The central doorway has a two-centred arch. The windows in the ground and middle floors have voussoirs of alternating red and yellow sandstone. The windows in the top two floors are paired with marble shafts, those in the top floor being gabled dormers.[67][310] II
Waggon Works
1863–65 A factory designed by E. G. Paley, later closed and used as a warehouse and offices. It is in sandstone with slate roofs. Along the road is a long range of single-storey workshops, some with roof ventilators. In the centre is a three-stage tower with a high wagon entrance, above which is a row of four round-headed windows. In the top stage are clock faces, and the tower is surmounted by a pyramidal roof with a timber bell-chamber. In the courtyard behind the tower are two-storey offices.[311][312] II
St Michael's Church
c. 1866 This was built as the chapel to Lancaster Moor Hospital, and designed by E. G. Paley in Neo-Norman style. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and consists of a nave, a west porch, transepts, and an apsidal chancel. The windows are round-headed with alternating red and yellow voussoirs, and in the transepts are rose windows.[229][313] II
Royal Albert Hospital
1868–73 Designed as a mental hospital by E. G. Paley in Gothic Revival style, it is in sandstone with hipped Coniston slate roofs. The building has a symmetrical plan, and is in two storeys with a basement and attics with dormers. The central block has six bays, flanked by eleven-bay wings containing a three-bay canted projection, and ending in three-bay pavilions. The central block has a triple-arched porch, above which is an oriel window. The block rises to become a three-storey tower with corner turrets and a steep roof containing three tiers of gabled dormers. The building has been converted for use as a college.[314][315] II*
Christ Church School
c. 1870 A primary school in sandstone with slate roofs. It has two storeys, a cross-wing with three bays to the left and five bays to the right, plus a single-storey porch. There are separate entrances for boys and girls, two dormers, and tall mullioned windows.[316] II
National Westminster Bank
1870 The bank was built for the Lancaster Banking Company, and was extended in the 20th century. It is in sandstone on a plinth of carboniferous limestone, and has a slate roof. The building has a rectangular plan, and is in the style of an Italian palazzo, with two storeys over a high basement, and with a main block of nine bays. The bays in the first floor are divided by Corinthian pilasters, and at the top is a modillion cornice. The doorway is flanked by polished pink granite Tuscan columns, and above it is a frieze and a pediment. To the left id a single-storey three-bay extension.[33][317] II*
Gateway and lodge,
Royal Albert Hospital
c. 1873 The gateway and lodge were designed by Paley and Austin in Gothic Revival style. They are in sandstone with a green slate roof. The gateway is in two storeys and consists of a large pointed arch with a smaller pedestrian arch to the right. In the upper storey are three trefoil-headed windows, above which is a hipped roof with finials. To the right of the gateway is a single-storey lodge with a canted bay window.[314][318] II
St Paul's Church
1874 Designed by Edmund Sharpe, and extended in 1890–91 by Paley, Austin and Paley, the church is built in brick and faced in grindstone with detailing in yellow terracotta. It combines a mixture of Romanesque and Gothic styles. The church consists of a nave with a clerestory, aisles, transepts at the western end, a chancel with an apsidal sanctuary, and a north vestry. The tower has two round-headed windows, a hipped roof with steep gables, each containing a vesica piscis opening, and a lead roof.[319][320] II
9 and 9A King Street
Late 19th century (possible) Two shops in sandstone with a slate roof, in three storeys. In the ground floor are shop fronts, the first floor contains two three-light windows, and in the top floor are three two-light windows.[321] II
Laurel Bank
Late 19th century A terrace of seven sandstone houses with slate roofs and decorative ridge tiles. Each house has two storeys, an attic, three bays, and a canted bay window some of which have retained cast iron railings. The central house is gabled, the outer houses have hipped roofs, and all but the central house have dormers. The other windows are sashes, some with mullions.[322][323] II
Royal Albert Farm,
Main building
Late 19th century The farm building is in sandstone with a green slate roof, and consists of a main range and two wings projecting to the east. The main range has six bays with a cart entrance in the west wall. The north wing has two storeys at its east end and a gable facing the road. The gable end contains an external flight of steps leading to a first floor doorway above which is a canopy.[8][295][324] II
Royal Albert Farm,
Barn
Late 19th century The barn is in sandstone with a green slate roof. In the centre is a cart entrance with a segmental head, and above it the roof forms a canopy. There are two rows of slit ventilators, and on the north and south walls are pitching holes.[295][325] II
Royal Albert Farm,
Western range
Late 19th century The farm building is in sandstone with a green slate roof. It is in a single storey, rising to two storeys towards the south, where there is a round-arched loading door and a projecting gable. To the right are doorways and windows.[295][326] II
Water closet cubicle (north),
St Michael's Church
Late 19th century The cubicle is to the north of the apse of the church, it is in cast iron, and has a rectangular plan. It is constructed with square panels between uprights, three on one side and two on the other. The panels are decorated with interlace patterns and above them is a cornice with cresting.[327] II
Water closet cubicle (west),
St Michael's Church
Late 19th century The cubicle is to the south of the west porch of the church, and has a rectangular plan. It is constructed with square panels between uprights, three on one side and two on the other. The panels are decorated with interlace patterns and above them is a cornice with cresting.[328] II
The Knoll
1879 A large house designed by Hubert Austin for his own use. It is in red brick with some tile hanging and applied timber-framing, and has an irregular plan. The main part is in two storeys, and the entrance is in a projecting wing with a jettied third storey containing an oriel window and surmounted by a bellcote. Elsewhere is a dormer and another oriel window, and on the roof is a viewing platform.[329][330] II
Royal King's Arms Hotel
1879 A hotel and shop in sandstone with brick a the rear and with slate roofs. It stands on a corner site and has an L-shaped plan, with four storeys, attics, and five-bay fronts with a caned bay on the corner. On both fronts the outer bays project forward and are pedimented. The Market Street front contains two oriel windows, and the King Street front is slightly concave.[59][331] II
Centenary Church
1879–81 Built as a Congregational church designed by J. C. Hetherington and G. D. Oliver in free Early English style, it became redundant and was later used as a public house. The church is in sandstone with slate roofs and red clay ridge tiles. It consists of a nave with aisles and a southwest steeple. On the entrance front is a triple lancet window, a rose window, and two round-headed doorways. The right side has two storeys and five bays. The steeple is 120 feet (37 m) high with a three-stage tower containing one of the entrances. It has a corbelled parapet, and octagonal corner turrets with spirelets. On the top is an octagonal broach spire with eight lucarnes.[23][332] II
30 Market Street
c. 1880 Originally council offices and later used as a shop, the building is in Italianate style. It is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof, in two tall storeys with a cellar, and it has a front of four narrow bays. In the ground floor is a shop front, and the upper floor contains round-headed windows and Corinthian pilasters, above which is a dentilled cornice.[333] II
Block 2, Moor Lane Mills North
c. 1880 This was originally part of a cotton mill, and was converted for other uses in 1988. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has three storeys. In the ground floor is a wagon entrance, and the first floor contains three-light mullioned windows.[334] II
Gate piers, gates and walls, Williamson Park, Quernmore Road
1880 The gate piers and walls are in sandstone. The piers are square with fluted pilasters, moulded cornices, and caps with fan-like carving. Flanking the piers are pedestrian entrances with semicircular arches, and carved friezes. Outside these are S-shaped walls terminating in piers. The gates are in cast iron.[335][336] II
Gate piers, gates and walls, Williamson Park, Wyresdale Road
1880 The gate piers and walls are in sandstone. The piers are square with fluted pilasters, moulded cornices, and caps with fan-like carving. Flanking the piers are pedestrian entrances with semicircular arches, and carved friezes. Outside these are S-shaped walls terminating in piers. The gates are in cast iron.[335][337] II
Lodge, Williamson Park, Wyresdale Road
1880 The lodge is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in two storeys. The main part is semi-octagonal with four bays. Set back to the left is a single-storey wing with a hipped roof, and a porch, The windows are sashes.[335][338] II
Lodge, Williamson Park, Quernmore Road
1880 The lodge is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in two storeys. The main part is semi-octagonal with four bays. Set back to the right is a single-storey wing with a hipped roof, and a porch, The windows are sashes.[335][339] II
St Leonard's House
1881–82 This originated as a furniture factory, and has since had different uses. The original part is in sandstone with a slate roof, in four storeys with a basement, and has a front of eleven bays. The windows are casements. In the early 20th century the building was extended to the left by ten bays, canted to follow the line of the road. This is in brick with concrete columns and timber windows.[173][340] II
Main block,
Moor Hospital
1882 This was built as an annex to the County Lunatic Asylum, and was designed by A. W. Kershaw. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, in Gothic Revival style. It consists of a main block in three storeys with a six-storey tower flanked by two ward wings linked by a central spine. The tower has corner pinnacles, and a central protruding porch with pointed arches and corner octagonal pinnacles. On each side of the tower are four bays with sash windows.[229][341] II
Waring and Gillow's Showrooms
1882 Furniture showrooms and offices in sandstone with slate roofs, in free Elizabethan style. There are three storeys with cellars and attics, and a front of 18 bays. On the front are four two-bay projections with gables and finials. The second projection is canted and contains the entrance. In the ground floor are showroom windows, and above there are cross windows containing sliding sashes.[67][342] II
Westbourne House
1882 A house, later used for other purposes, in rendered concrete with slate roofs. There is a main block with two storeys, cellars, attics and two bays and, to the right, a three-stage tower with a pyramidal roof. On the entrance front is a projecting single-storey porch, and the garden front are two bay windows.[343] II
Wall, gates, gate piers and steps, Lancaster Moor Hospital
1883 The walls and gate piers are in gritstone and the gates are iron; the gate piers and gates are all ornate. At the entrance from the road there is a central wide gate flanked by pedestrian gates, with four gate piers. Inside these are two flights of steps flanked by walls with ornate posts at the bottom and top.[344] II
Church steps
1884 A flight of 25 sandstone steps leading up to the churchyard of Lancaster Priory, replacing a previous flight dating from 1761. They are laid in pairs with the tread of alternate steps being twice as long as the previous one.[345] II
Chapel,
Ripley St Thomas School
1884-88 The school chapel, by Paley and Austin in Gothic Revival style, is in sandstone with Westmorland slate roofs. It consists of a nave and chancel under one roof, a south aisle, a transeptal vestry, a northeast stair tower, and a northwest porch. On the roof is an octagonal flèche with a weathervane.[346][347] II*
Former Masonic Hall
1885 The Masonic Hall was designed by Paley and Austin in Jacobean style, and incorporates earlier material. It is in sandstone, with two and three storeys and a basement. The doorway is to the right, and in the centre is a canted oriel window with a panelled dado surmounted by a gable. The windows are mullioned and transomed.[33][348] II
Entrance lodge,
Ripley St Thomas School
1885 The lodge, designed by Paley and Austin, is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has an L-shaped plan, with a gabled cross-wing, and is in one storey with an attic. The cross-wing contains a bow window, the main range has a mullioned window, and the porch is in the angle.[346][349] II
Pye's Building
c. 1885 A warehouse and office in sandstone with a slate roof on a corner site. There are five storeys with cellars and gabled fronts of two and four bays. The doorway has a pediment, and the windows are sliding sashes.[350] II
Midland Bank
1887 Built for the Preston Banking Company, the bank was extended in 1924 by incorporating Nos 37–39 Market Street. It is in sandstone on a granite plinth, with slate roofs, and is in Italianate style. The original building has two storeys and two bays, and contains a former carriage entrance and the entrance to the bank. The building to the right has three storeys and three bays. Features on the front include a richly decorated frieze, a balustraded parapet, and an arcade with Corinthian pilasters.[351][352] II
Storey Institute
1887–71 Designed by Paley, Austin and Paley, this was originally a school, library and art gallery, and stands on a corner site. It is in sandstone and with slate roofs, and has two storeys with attics. On the corner is an octagonal turret with a dome. The building has faces of three and four bays. The bays have shaped gables with attic dormers between them. The doorway has a moulded architrave and a segmental pediment, and is flanked by engaged Tuscan columns.[353][354] II
Royal Lancaster Infirmary
1893–96 The hospital by Paley, Austin and Paley is in free Renaissance style, and built in sandstone with slate roofs. It has an octagonal entrance tower that is flanked by wings. The tower has four stages, and above the entrance is a niche containing a Coade stone statue of the Good Samaritan. In the upper parts are a balustrade, bullseye windows, the Royal coat of arms, and a dome. The windows are sashes with architraves and a keystones.[355][356] II
Storey Home
1896–98 A home for disadvantaged girls, later converted into flats, it is in sandstone with hipped Westmorland slate roofs. The east front has seven bays, the middle three with three storeys, and the outer bys forming slightly projecting two-bay wings. On the front is a canted porch, above which is a gablet with a coat of arms, and over this is an inscribed plaque. Also on the front are a canted bay window, a gabled dormer, and mullioned and transomed windows.[295][357] II
Cathedral School
1897 A Roman Catholic school by Paley and Austin in Gothic Revival style. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, on a sloping site, in two storeys, with four gables facing the road. In front of the school is a low wall with piers and railings, containing a doorway with a pointed head, above which is a carved shield with a crown and a monogram.[358] II
Farmers' Arms Hotel
1897 Originally two hotels, later combined into one, designed by C. J. Ashworth with Baroque features. It is on a corner site with an L-shaped plan, in sandstone with slate roofs, in three storeys and with 13 irregular bays. On the corner is a wide diagonal bay with a seven-light mullioned and transomed bow window, above which is a cross window, and at the top is a Flemish gable with a scrolled pediment and a ball finial.[9][67][359] II
Cross, Roman Catholic Cemetery
1899 The cross replaced by one of 1851 by E. G. Paley that was blown down in a gale. It is in sandstone and stands on two octagonal steps. It consists of an octagonal shaft on an octagonal base carved with a blind arcade and inscription. The shaft has a cap carved with a lamb and an eagle, and it carries a cross with Christ on one side and Mary on the other.[360] II
Bailrigg House
1899–1902 A country house by Woolfall and Eccles in Vernacular Revival style with Arts and Crafts features. It is built mainly in brick with some sandstone dressings and applied timber-framing. Its features include multiple roofs, Tudor-style chimneys, gables, dormers, windows of varying types, gargoyles, and finials.[361] II
Barclays Bank
c. 1900 Built as a branch of the Bank of Liverpool, this stands on a corner site. It is in stone with slate roofs, and is in Elizabethan style. There are three storeys with attics, and three bays on both Market Street and New Street fronts, with a bay between them containing the entrance. The doorway is round-headed with Ionic pilasters. At the top of this bay is a gabled dormer with a square finial. On both fronts are gables flanked by turrets. All the windows are mullioned and transomed.[362] II
Duke of Lancaster Public House
1900 The public house is in sandstone, the upper parts being roughcast, with a slate roof and red ridge tiles. It stands on a corner site, with two storeys with cellars and attics, three asymmetrical bays on each front, and a rounded bay on the corner with a turret, a cornice, a dome, and a spike finial. On both fronts are round-headed doorways, gables, and on the China Street front is a dormer. Also on this front is a two-storey wing, and in the yard is a two-storey stable.[103][363] II
St Joseph's Church
1900 A Roman Catholic church by Pugin and Pugin in Perpendicular style. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of a nave with a clerestory, aisles, a chancel, north and south chapels, a south vestry, a southwest octagonal baptistry, and a southwest tower. The tower has a parapet with traceried openings and gargoyles, and there is a large west window.[269][364] II
Cooperative Store
1901 A departmental store on a corner site by Austin and Paley in Free Jacobean style. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has an L-shaped plan. It has two storeys, attics with ornate gables, and fronts of eight and nine bays. The corner bay is canted, and contains a round-headed doorway, above which is a semicircular oriel with a five-light mullioned and transomed window surmounted by a carved panel. Above this is a cross-window with Ionic pilasters, a cartouche containing a beehive symbol, and a segmental pediment.[33][365] II
Alexandra Hotel
1902 The hotel is in Free Jacobean style and stands on a corner site. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and has three storeys, with fronts of eight and five bays and a canted bay on the corner. On the Thurnham Street front is a two-storey canted bay window with a Dutch gable flanked by octagonal turrets.[67][366] II
Covell Cross
1903 A commemorative cross to celebrate the coronation of Edward VII, designed by Austin and Paley in sandstone. It consists of a tapering square shaft on a plinth and a stepped base, both octagonal. At the top is a cross-head carved with leaves. On the plinth are carved shields with coats of arms and with inscriptions.[103][367] II
Balustrades,
Dalton Square
c. 1905 The balustrades surround the garden in the square. There are four quadrants, each balustrade has a plinth, and there are four runs of vase balusters between panelled piers. At the ends of the balusters are taller piers each with a torchère carrying a lantern with an egg-shaped globe.[368] II
Ashton Memorial
1905–09 Built as a memorial for the family of Lord Ashton, and designed by John Belcher in Edwardian Baroque style. It is in Portland stone over brick, and has steel joists and concrete infill. There are balustrades of Cornish granite and steps of Hopton Wood limestone. It has a square plan, is 150 feet (46 m) tall, and has a copper-clad dome. Other features include a flight of steps, dividing to enclose a fountain, porticos with Tuscan columns, and subsidiary domes, On the top is a drum with Corinthian columns, carved shields, structures of allegorical figures, and a lantern with a balustrade.[369][370] I
Queen Victoria Memorial
1906 A monument by Herbert Hampton in Portland stone with elements in bronze. A plinth stands on a stepped base, and on the plinth are four bronze lions and a pedestal carrying a bronze statue of Queen Victoria holding a mace. The plinth has a prominent cornice, and on its sides are bronze bas-reliefs portraying notable Victorians and representations of virtues.[371][372] II*
Town Hall
1906–09 The town hall, designed by Edward Mountford in Edwardian Baroque style, is built in Longridge stone with slate roofs. It is in two and three storeys over a basement. The main front has eleven bays, the middle five bays having a portico with six giant unfluted Ionic columns, and a tympanum containing limestone sculptures including Edward VII. The flanking bays contain sash windows and a balustraded parapet. On the roof is a clock tower with Tuscan columns, and a dome with a finial.[373][374] II*
Garden walls, gate piers and gates, Town Hall
1908 The walls and gate piers are in sandstone and surround the garden to the east of the town hall. The walls have a deep plinth and contain a balustrade of vase balusters between panels. There are two gateways, each with three square piers, comprising a plinth, a panelled pillar, and a cornice. The ornamental gates are in wrought and cast iron, and are surmounted by a panel containing a shield with coats of arms.[371][375] II
Town Hall Computer Block
1908 Originating as a fire station, and later used as offices, it was designed by Edward Mountford in Baroque style. The building is in sandstone with slate roofs, it has one storey with an attic, and fronts of five and three bays. The first three bays contain flat-arched doorways, now glazed, and to the right are two windows and a doorway. Above the middle bay is a lunette, on the right side is a blocked doorway with a Gibbs surround, and on the left side is a canted oriel window. Behind the fourth bay is a tower with lunettes, a copper-covered dome, and a weathercock.[371][376] II
Bridge over lake
1909 The bridge crosses the ornamental lake in Williamson Park. It was designed by Belcher and Joass, and is in rusticated sandstone, consisting of a single semi-elliptical arch with scrolled keystones. The parapets have moulded copings and three balustraded openings.[377] II
Palm House
c. 1909 The palm house in Williamson Park is in brick on a sandstone plinth. It has glazing bars in timber and metal, and columns and a Doric entablature in timber and painted render. The building has a rectangular plan and a convex hipped glass roof. The west front is symmetrical and contains a central semicircular porch with six Tuscan columns, flanked on each side by three bays.[378] II
Tower, Williamson Park
c. 1909 The tower stands to the south of the Ashton Memorial, it is the remains of a garden pavilion, in limestone, and in Baroque style. The tower stands on a hexagonal stepped platform, it has a hexagonal plan, is about 10 metres (33 ft) high, and is in three unequal stages. In the top stage are small Ionic columns, a prominent cornice and a domed cap.[379] II
Lancaster Girls' Grammar School
1912–14 The school was designed by Henry Littler in free Edwardian Baroque style. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of two parallel ridges, two gabled cross-wings, and a separate plainer block at the rear. It is in three storeys with a symmetrical eleven-bay front. The windows are mullioned. In each cross-wing is an octagonal stair turret with a tall battlemented parapet and an octagonal cupola. The central doorway has Ionic columns and an open segmental pediment containing a coat of arms.[353][380] II
21 Market Street
c. 1918 Originating as the Palladium Cinema and café, it was converted into a shop in about 1985. The building is steel framed, faced with grey terracotta, and is in Baroque style. It has three storeys and three bays. The entrance and shop windows in the ground floor are framed by Tuscan columns. In the upper storeys are rusticated pilasters and sash windows containing stained glass.[20][381] II
War Memorial,
Christ Church
c. 1920 The war memorial is in the churchyard, it is in sandstone, and consists of an octagonal plinth with two octagonal steps carrying a square base. The base has crocketed buttresses, and carvings on the sides. On the base stands a tapering octagonal shaft surmounted by a foliated capital and a cross.[382] II
War Memorial,
Nelson Street
1924 In the centre is a bronze statue of Victory by the Bromsgrove Guild. This is flanked by sandstone walls, each with five bronze panels containing the names of he fallen in the First World War. In front of the statue is a stone tomb-chest with bronze plates carrying the names of those lost in the Second World War and in Korea. In the front is a plain screen wall, behind which steps lead up to the statue.[371][383] II
War memorial,
Storey Avenue
1925 The war memorial consists of a bronze statue on a sandstone base. There is a rectangular plinth on two steps, and the statue depicts a soldier supporting a wounded comrade and giving him a drink. On the base is an inscribed plaque.[13][384] II
Children's Library
1932 A public library incorporating the façade of the Lancaster Savings Bank of 1823, which is in Greek Revival style. The library is in sandstone and has a flat roof with a skylight. There is one storey and a three-bay front. The outer bays are recessed and contain two pairs of fluted Ionic columns with an entablature and a dentilled cornice. In front of the columns is an iron balustrade. The central doorway is flanked by Doric pilasters, above which is an inscribed panel and a pediment.[385][386] II
Public library
1932 The library is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has two storeys, and a front of three bays. The doorway has a flat arch with a triple keystone above which is an inscribed panel, and an open segmental pediment carried on engaged Tuscan columns.[385][387] II
Former municipal baths and transport depot
1937–39 Following a conversion in 2007–08, only the sandstone façade remains. The front of the former baths consists of a central block of two storeys and five bays, flanked by single-storey wings, five to the left and seven to the right. In the central block are two fluted columns without capitals, and along the top of the block is a frieze with octagonal panels. To the north the front of the former transport depot contains vehicle entrance and windows, and a frieze with square motifs.[10][388][389] II

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows that the warehouse has been restored and converted for domestic use
  2. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows that the warehouse has been restored and converted for domestic use
  3. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows that the warehouses have been restored and converted for domestic use
  4. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows that the building was unoccupied
  5. ^ Street View in October 2014 showed this to be the Chenrezig Buddhist Centre
  6. ^ Street View in October 2009 showed this to be part of the Sun Hotel.
  7. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows the building to be used as a tapas bar and a shop
  8. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows that the main and the ancillary farm buildings have been converted for domestic use
  9. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows the name to have been changed to Penny Street Bridge
  10. ^ Street View in October 2014 shows that the former baths are occupied by PC World, and flats have been built behind the façade of the transport depot.

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  199. ^ Historic England (1194914)
  200. ^ Historic England (1210404)
  201. ^ Historic England (1298371)
  202. ^ Historic England (1298372)
  203. ^ Historic England (1195063)
  204. ^ Historic England (1298336)
  205. ^ Historic England (1298341)
  206. ^ Historic England (1195003)
  207. ^ Historic England (1194967)
  208. ^ Historic England (1211982)
  209. ^ Historic England (1212012)
  210. ^ Historic England (1212064)
  211. ^ Historic England (1195074)
  212. ^ Historic England (1195075)
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  214. ^ Historic England (1298308)
  215. ^ Historic England (1195056)
  216. ^ Historic England (1298331)
  217. ^ Historic England (1214479)
  218. ^ Historic England (1214567)
  219. ^ Historic England (1288284)
  220. ^ Historic England (1194964)
  221. ^ Historic England (1290807)
  222. ^ Historic England (1288289)
  223. ^ Historic England (1194975)
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  • Historic England, "No 1 Queen Square, Lancaster (1212342)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "United Reformed Church, Lancaster (1194996)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 78 and 80 Church Street, Lancaster (1298413)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Storey Institute, back entrance, Lancaster (1194906)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 1–5 Aldcliffe Village, Lancaster (1298377)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 1A Castle Hill, Lancaster (1210343)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 9 Castle Hill, Lancaster (1290848)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 23 Castle Hill, Lancaster (1298386)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 4 Castle Park, Lancaster (1194940)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 6 Castle Park, Lancaster (1290818)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 57, 59 and 61 Church Street, Lancaster (1210295)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 98 Church Street, Lancaster (1210346)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 100 Church Street, Lancaster (1194917)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 34–38 King Street, Lancaster (1290229)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 87 King Street, Lancaster (1211085)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 89 King Street, Lancaster (1298340)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 91 King Street, Lancaster (1211093)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 95 and 97 King Street, Lancaster (1211134)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 66 Market Street, Lancaster (1194970)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 11 Moor Lane, Lancaster (1211607)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 4 New Street, Lancaster (1194978)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 6 New Street, Lancaster (1211860)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 14 New Street, Lancaster (1194979)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 22 New Street, Lancaster (1194980)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 24 New Street, Lancaster (1194981)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 Queen Square, Lancaster (1195072)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 3 and 5 Queen Square, Lancaster (1298301)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 4 Queen Square, Lancaster (1212546)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 1 Queen Street, Lancaster (1195073)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 1B Queen Street, Lancaster (1212558)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 4 and 6 Queen Street, Lancaster (1212567)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 5 and 7 Queen Street, Lancaster (1298302)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 12 Queen Street, Lancaster (1212593)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 20 and 22 Queen Street, Lancaster (1212598)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 23 St George's Quay, Lancaster (1298307)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 29–33 St George's Quay, Lancaster (1213806)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 35 St George's Quay, Lancaster (1288858)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 36–37 St George's Quay, Lancaster (1195084)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 108 and 110 St Leonard's Gate, Lancaster (1195047)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 112 and 114 St Leonard's Gate, Lancaster (1195048)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 129 and 131 St Leonard's Gate, Lancaster (1195049)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 10–20 Sun Street, Lancaster (1214477)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 22 and 24 Sun Street, Lancaster (1288587)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 25 Sun Street, Lancaster (1195057)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 1 Water Street, Lancaster (1288462)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Brown Cow Public House, Lancaster (1212267)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church House, Lancaster (1194916)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Crown Inn, Lancaster (1195046)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "George and Dragon Public House, Lancaster (1289071)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "High Street Cottage, Lancaster (1194995)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 93 High Street, Lancaster (1195000)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Bobbin, Lancaster (1290604)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Lunecliffe Hall, Lancaster (1194962)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Rawlinson Memorial, approximately 13 metres north of tower of Church of St Mary, Lancaster (1212472)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Slip Inn, Lancaster (1298375)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Sundial approximately 15 metres south of tower of Priory Church of St Mary, Lancaster (1195070)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Three warehouses, now part of No.26, Maritime Museum, Lancaster (1195083)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Tramway Hotel, Lancaster (1214107)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Pair of gate piers and wall at roadside, west of United Reformed Church, Lancaster (1210935)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 28 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Victoria Corn Mill, Lancaster (1298309)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Wagon and Horses Public House, Lancaster (1289023)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 High Street, Lancaster (1194994)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 4 High Street, Lancaster (1210850)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 6 High Street, Lancaster (1298374)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Highmount House and attached railings, Lancaster (1210914)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 65 Church Street, Lancaster (1210301)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "City Museum, The Old Town Hall, Lancaster (1194971)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Grand Theatre, Lancaster (1195050)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 19 Castle Hill, Lancaster (1194938)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 14 Penny Street, Lancaster (1194985)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 38–42 Parliament Street, Lancaster (1194984)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Skerton Bridge, Lancaster (1212253)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Skerton Bridge, Lancaster (1005109)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Greycourt, Lancaster (1195051)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Garden house behind No.2, Greycourt, Lancaster (1214229)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Dukes Theatre, Lancaster (1211613)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Haverbreaks Bridge (No.95), Lancaster (1290286)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Basin Bridge (No.98), Lancaster (1194963)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Dolphinlee Bridge (No.105), Lancaster (1194907)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Halton Road Bridge (No.108), Lancaster (1194993)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Beaumont Hall Bridge (No.109), Lancaster (1194992)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Hammerton Hall Bridge (No.111), Lancaster (1298373)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Newton Beck Culvert, Lancaster (1194908)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 Dalton Square and Palatine Hall, Lancaster (1194918)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 8 and 9 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1194919)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 1 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1210398)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Pebble forecourt to Nos. 18, 18A, 20 AND 22 Castle Park, Lancaster (1194944)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 21 Castle Hill, Lancaster (1220753)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 67 Church Street, Lancaster (1194914)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 17–18 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1210404)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 1 Great John Street, No 2 Moor Lane, Lancaster (1298371)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 13 Great John Street, Lancaster (1298372)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Golgotha, 3–5 Wyresdale Road, with attached garden walls, Lancaster (1195063)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Golgotha, 7–10 Wyresdale Road, Lancaster (1298336)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 99 King Street, Lancaster (1212012)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 26 Market Street, Lancaster (1195003)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 53 and 53A Market Street, Lancaster (1194967)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 19 and 21 New Street, Lancaster (1211982)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 23 New Street, Lancaster (1212012)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 28 New Street, Lancaster (1212064)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 3 Queen Street, Lancaster (1195074)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 14 Queen Street, Lancaster (1195075)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 21 and 22 St George's Quay, Lancaster (1213377)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 34 St George's Quay, Lancaster (1298308)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 13, 15, and 17 Sun Street, Lancaster (1195056)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 19 and 21 Sun Street, Lancaster (1298331)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 26 and 28 Sun Street, Lancaster (1214479)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 31, 33 and 35 Sun Street, Lancaster (1214567)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Golgotha, 6 Wyresdale Road, with attached garden walls, Lancaster (1288284)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Old Blacksmith's Shop, approximately 30 metres east of Basin Bridge, Lancaster (1194964)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Posts (five) at south-west end, near junction with Castle Park, Lancaster (1290807)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Row of outhouses approximately 3 metres to rear of Nos.3-10 Golgotha, Lancaster (1288289)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Mill Hall, Lancaster (1194975)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Royal Hotel and Owen House, Lancaster (1195058)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 Bridget Street Former warehouse behind No 5 Great John Street, Lancaster (1291188)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 5 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1210402)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Bath House, Lancaster (1219976)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Moor Hospital, Blocks 40, 41, 42, 44 and 46, Lancaster (1289436)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Former National School, Lancaster (1290274)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 4 Fenton Street, Lancaster (1194986)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 6 Fenton Street, Lancaster (1194987)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 3 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1290475)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Royal Bank of Scotland, Lancaster (1289809)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 18, 18A, 20 and 20A Brock Street, Lancaster (1194934)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 25 Brock Street, Lancaster (1220062)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 Bryer Street, Lancaster (1291162)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 Castle Park and attached walls and railings, Lancaster (1220811)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 26 Castle Park, Lancaster (1194945)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 22 and 24 Church Street, Lancaster (1210225)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 69 and 71 Church Street, Lancaster (1210324)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 11 and 12 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1210403)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 15 and 16 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1194920)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 19 and 20 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1194921)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 21 Dalton Square, Lancaster (1210468)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 5 and 7 Great John Street, Lancaster (1194989)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 7–11 Fryer Street, Lancaster (1194991)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 4–6 Hillside, Lancaster (1290264)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 7 King Street, Lancaster (1210961)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 52 and 54 Market Street, Lancaster (1211373)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 54A, 56 and 58 Market Street, Lancaster (1298360)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 61 Market Street, Lancaster (1298361)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 2, and 21A Queen Street, Lancaster (1298303)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 23, 23A, 23B and 23C Queen Street, Lancaster (1212614)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 25, 27 and 27C Queen Street, Lancaster (1212634)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 29 Queen Street, Lancaster (1195076)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 4–10 Sulyard Street, Lancaster (1214476)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Bowerham House, Lancaster (1288525)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Dacrelands, Lancaster (1194926)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "John O' Gaunt Public House, Lancaster (1194968)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Skerton Liberal Club, Lancaster (1290141)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Mill 1, Moor Lane Mills South, Lancaster (1289875)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "East Lodge to former Aldcliffe Hall, Lancaster (1194966)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 4 Dalton Square and attached railings, Lancaster (1298376)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Trades Hall, Lancaster (1194988)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Old Boathouse on east side of Canal, approximately 100 metres west of Basin Bridge, Lancaster (1194965)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church of St Luke, Lancaster (1195002)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Ryelands House, Lancaster (1212160)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Ryelands Lodge, Lancaster (1194983)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 25 Castle Hill, Lancaster (1220781)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 2 Dallas Road, Lancaster (1290511)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 10 and 12 Middle Street, Lancaster (1289948)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nurses' Home, Lancaster (1194927)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church of St Thomas, Lancaster (1195066)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Walls and railings around the Church of St Thomas, Lancaster (1298338)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Greaves Park, Lancaster (1194933)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "WRVS Offices, Lancaster (1214643)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Railway Station Buildings, Lancaster (1195054)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Former Vicarage, Lancaster (1195071)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Perimeter walls and gateway of Roman Catholic Cemetery, Lancaster (1194924)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Windermere House, Lancaster (1298364)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 17 New Street, Lancaster (1298368)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 1–9 St Mary's Parade, Lancaster (1214351)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 15 and 19 St Mary's Parade, Lancaster (1195052)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 21–29 St Mary's Parade, Lancaster (1214387)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Monument approximately 19 metres west of tower of Priory Church of St Mary, Lancaster (1195069)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 1–9 High Street, Lancaster (1210838)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Royal Grammar School (Old School), Lancaster (1194925)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Barracks, White Cross, Lancaster (1298329)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Eastern mortuary chapel at Lancaster Cemetery (1195078)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Northern mortuary chapel at Lancaster Cemetery (1212689)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Western mortuary chapel at Lancaster Cemetery (1298305)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Lancaster Cemetery Lodge (1212683)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Christ Church, Lancaster (1214919)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Cathedral Church of St Peter, Lancaster (1214397)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Cathedral House, Lancaster (1195053)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Crimea Monument in Lancaster Cemetery (1298304)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Entrance gateway at Ripley St Thomas School, Lancaster (1298379)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 32 Parliament Street, Lancaster (1212179)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Waggon Works (front range and office), Lancaster (1298408)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church of St Michael, Moor Hospital, Lancaster (1289454)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Royal Albert Hospital (original part only), Lancaster (1194930)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Christ Church Primary School, Lancaster (1391004)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "National Westminster Bank, Lancaster (1290544)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 17 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Lodge to Royal Albert Hospital, Lancaster (1219861)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church of St Paul, Lancaster (1288582)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Nos 9 and 9A King Street, Lancaster (1194997)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Laurel Bank, Lancaster (1298333)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Main building at Royal Albert Farm, Royal Albert Hospital, Lancaster (1219846)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Barn at Royal Albert Farm, Royal Albert Hospital, Lancaster (1194931)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Western range of buildings at Royal Albert Farm, Royal Albert Hospital, Lancaster (1219893)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Water closet cubicle immediately north of apse of Church of St Michael, Moor Hospital, Lancaster (1289423)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Water closet cubicle immediately south of west porch of Church of St Michael, Moor Hospital, Lancaster (1195077)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Knoll, Lancaster (1214751)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Royal King's Arms Hotel, Lancaster (1298362)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Centenary Church, Lancaster (1288711)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 30 Market Street, Lancaster (1298343)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Block 2, Moor Lane Mills North, Lancaster (1289915)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Gate piers, gates and walls to Williamson Park, Quernmore Road, Lancaster (1213076)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Gate piers, gates and walls to Williamson Park, Wyresdale Road, Lancaster (1214963)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Lodge to Williamson Park, Quernmore Road, Lancaster (1195080)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Lodge to Williamson Park, Wyresdale Road, Lancaster (1195062)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "St Leonard's House, Lancaster (1214180)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Moor Hospital, New Block, Lancaster (1195079)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Waring and Gillow's Showrooms, Lancaster (1212101)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Westbourne House, Lancaster (1195060)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Boundary walls, railings, gates and gate piers at Lancaster Moor Hospital (1391761)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church Steps, Lancaster (1298328)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Chapel of Ripley St Thomas School, Lancaster (1194928)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Former Masonic Hall, Lancaster (1210331)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Entrance lodge at Ripley St Thomas School, Lancaster (1194929)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Pye's Building, Lancaster (1194977)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Midland Bank, Lancaster (1195004)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Storey Institute, Lancaster (1194973)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Royal Lancaster Infirmary (original building) (1194932)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Storey Home, Lancaster (1119699)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Cathedral School, including attached wall, railings and doorway, Lancaster (1219944)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Farmers' Arms Hotel, Lancaster (1195067)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Cross in Roman Catholic Cemetery, Lancaster (1210571)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 27 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Bailrigg House, Lancaster (1391378)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Barclay's Bank, Lancaster (1290071)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Duke of Lancaster Public House, Lancaster (1194915)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Church of St Joseph, Lancaster (1298370)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Cooperative Store, Lancaster (1210255)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Alexandra Hotel, Lancaster (1195065)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Covell Cross, Lancaster (1290496)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Balustrades around central gardens, Lancaster (1194922)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 12 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Ashton Memorial, Lancaster (1288429)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Queen Victoria Memorial, Lancaster (1290440)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Town Hall, Lancaster (1194923)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Walls, gate piers and gates to Town Hall Gardens, Lancaster (1298366)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Town Hall Computer Block, Lancaster (1194990)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Bridge over the lake, Lancaster (1288372)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 15 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "The Palm House, Lancaster (1195061)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Tower approximately 100 metres south of the Ashton Memorial, Lancaster (1298334)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Lancaster Girls' Grammar School (1213320)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "No 21 Market Street, Lancaster (1211244)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "War Memorial approximately 5 metres north of Christ Church, Lancaster (1298335)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "War Memorial, Lancaster (1211793)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "War Memorial, Lancaster (1195055)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Children's Library, Lancaster (1298369)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Public Library, Lancaster (1194972)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2015 
  • Historic England, "Municipal Baths and Transport Depot with low retaining walls to sides, Lancaster (1119714)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 May 2015 
  • Historic England, Listed Buildings, retrieved 7 May 2015 
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