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Lone Jack, Missouri

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Lone Jack, Missouri

Lone Jack, Missouri
City
Location of Lone Jack, Missouri
Location of Lone Jack, Missouri
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Missouri
County Jackson
Area[1]
 • Total 3.75 sq mi (9.71 km2)
 • Land 3.75 sq mi (9.71 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,017 ft (310 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,050
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,065
 • Density 280.0/sq mi (108.1/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 64070
Area code(s) 816
FIPS code 29-43760[4]
GNIS feature ID 0758307[5]

Lone Jack is a city in Jackson County, Missouri, United States. The population was 1,050 at the 2010 U.S. Census.[6]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Education 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

Lone Jack was laid out in 1841. Its name comes from a single black jack tree that stood as a local landmark.[7]

On August 16, 1862 Federal troops were defeated in the Battle of Lone Jack by a much larger Confederate force. The fighting literally occurred on the main street and raged for five hours before the Federals withdrew. The Confederates were unable to hold the town following their victory because of converging Union forces from other commands.

Geography

Lone Jack is located at (38.870516, -94.188174).[8] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.75 square miles (9.71 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,050 people, 378 households, and 302 families residing in the city. The population density was 280.0 inhabitants per square mile (108.1/km2). There were 404 housing units at an average density of 107.7 per square mile (41.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.3% White, 2.0% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.5% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population.

There were 378 households of which 44.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 13.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 20.1% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 32.2 years. 28.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 30.3% were from 25 to 44; 25.6% were from 45 to 64; and 7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 528 people, 202 households, and 153 families residing in the city. The population density was 137.6 people per square mile (53.1/km²). There were 214 housing units at an average density of 55.8 per square mile (21.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.64% White, 0.35% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.38% Asian, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.76% of the population and .13% Hawaiian.

There were 202 households out of which 39.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.4% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $51,154, and the median income for a family was $57,500. Males had a median income of $37,031 versus $31,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,558. 3.6% of the population were living below the poverty line, including 7.5% of those over 64.8. No families or minors are living below the poverty line.

Education

Lone Jack is the home of the 2006 Class 1 State Championship Cross-Country Team,[11] the first state championship in school history. Team members included: state champ Grant Brown, Sean Feehan, Nathan Pickering, Arron Ginnings, Luke Pilgrim, Zach Bahner, Stephan Albin, Greg Brown, Jack McGowen, Austin Warren, Brock Sears, and Tyler Becvar. Troy Brandes was the Coach. In 2003, the Lone Jack basketball team made its first Final Four appearance, coached by Chris Johnson.[12]

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ "Missouri by Place Geographic Comparison Table". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2007-09-19. 
  7. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 178. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "2006 Class 1 Boys Team Championship Results".  
  12. ^ Sprague, David (2004-03-18). "Preview of Class 1-3 Boys Show-Me Showdown". The Missourinet. Archived from the original on November 4, 2013. Retrieved 2007-09-19. 

External links

  • Historic Lone Jack.org
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