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Loyalty Day

Loyalty Day
Observed by United States
Celebrations Special day for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States and for the recognition of the heritage of American freedom[1]
Date May 1
Next time 1 May 2017 (2017-05-01)
Frequency annual

Loyalty Day is observed on May 1 in the United States. It is a day set aside for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States and for the recognition of the heritage of American freedom.

Loyalty Day is celebrated with parades and ceremonies in several U.S. communities.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Statutory definition 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History

The holiday was first observed in 1921, during the First Red Scare.[2] It was originally called "Americanization Day,"[3] and it was intended to replace the May 1 ("May Day") celebration of the International Workers' Day, which commemorates the 1886 Haymarket Massacre in Chicago.[4]

During the Second Red Scare, it was recognized by the U.S. Congress on April 27, 1955,[5] and made an official reoccurring holiday on July 18, 1958 (Public Law 85-529).[1][6] President Dwight D. Eisenhower proclaimed May 1, 1955, the first observance of Loyalty Day.[7] In 1958 Eisenhower urged Congress to move Child Health Day to the First Monday in October, to avoid conflicting with Loyalty Day[6][8] Loyalty Day has been recognized with an official proclamation every year by every president since its inception as a legal holiday in 1958.[9][10]

Statutory definition

Loyalty Day is defined as follows in 36 U.S.C. § 115:

  • (a) Designation.— May 1 is Loyalty Day.
  • (b) Purpose.— Loyalty Day is a special day for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States and for the recognition of the heritage of American freedom.
  • (c) Proclamation.— The President is requested to issue a proclamation—
    • (1) calling on United States Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on Loyalty Day; and
    • (2) inviting the people of the United States to observe Loyalty Day with appropriate ceremonies in schools and other suitable places.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "36 U.S. Code § 115 - Loyalty Day". Legal Information Institute. New York: Cornell University Law School. August 12, 1998. Retrieved April 11, 2009. 
  2. ^ Conn, Matt (March 24, 2004). "Loyalty Day celebration set for return to Medford". Wausau Daily Herald (Wausau, Wisconsin: Gannett). 
  3. ^ "Patriotic Days". VFW Veterans of Foreign Wars. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  4. ^ "A short history of May Day". Libcom.org. September 11, 2006. Retrieved May 1, 2014. 
  5. ^ "84th Congress, 1st Session" (PDF). United States Statutes at Large (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office) 69: 44. 1955. 
  6. ^ a b Eisenhower, Dwight D. (July 18, 1958). Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, eds. "Statement by the President Upon Signing Resolution Designating May 1 as Loyalty Day.". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  7. ^ Eisenhower, Dwight D. (April 28, 1955). Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, eds. "Proclamation 3091 - Loyalty Day, 1955". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  8. ^ Eisenhower, Dwight D. (April 18, 1959). "Presidential Proclamation 3282 declaring May 1, 1959 Loyalty Day". OPA - Online Public Access. National Archives. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Search Results: Loyalty Day". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  10. ^ Office of the Federal Register (1967). The Code of Federal regulations of the United States of America. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 42-43. 
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