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Manhattan Theatre Club

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Title: Manhattan Theatre Club  
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Subject: Riverside Shakespeare Company, Broadway theatre, Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, Doubt: A Parable, Love! Valour! Compassion!
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Manhattan Theatre Club

Manhattan Theatre Club (MTC) is a theatre company located in New York City, affiliated with the League of Resident Theatres. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Lynne Meadow and Executive Producer Barry Grove, Manhattan Theatre Club has grown since its founding in 1970 from an Off-Off Broadway showcase into one of the country’s most acclaimed theatre organizations.

MTC’s many awards include nineteen Tony Awards,[1] six Pulitzer Prizes, 48 Obie Awards and 32 Drama Desk Awards, as well as numerous Drama Critics Circle, Outer Critics Circle and Theatre World Awards.[2] MTC has won the Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Achievement, a Drama Desk for Outstanding Excellence, and a Theatre World for Outstanding Achievement.[3][4][5]

MTC produces plays and musicals on and off-Broadway while maintaining a commitment to living playwrights and taking a comprehensive approach to artistic development and arts education. Its mission and values give MTC a unique place in American theatre.

Contents

  • Mission 1
  • Notable productions 2
  • Facilities 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Mission

According to the MTC, its mission is:

  • "to produce a season of innovative work with a series of productions as broad and diverse as New York itself;
  • to encourage significant new work by creating an environment in which writers and theatre artists are supported by the finest professionals producing theatre today;
  • to nurture new talent in playwriting, musical composition, directing, acting and design;
  • to reach out to young audiences with innovative programs in education and maintain a commitment to cultivating the next generation of theatre professionals."[6]

Notable productions

Facilities

The Samuel J. Friedman Theatre

The Manhattan Theatre Club purchased the Biltmore Theatre in 2001 as a Broadway home for its productions.[7] After renovations, it re-opened in October 2003. With 650 seats the Friedman has about two-thirds of the capacity of the old Biltmore Theatre, although it now boasts modern conveniences such as elevators and meeting rooms. The theatre was renamed the "Samuel J. Friedman Theatre" on September 4, 2008 in honor of Broadway publicist Samuel Friedman.[8]

New York City Center, Stage I & Stage II

In 1984, the Manhattan Theatre Club moved to New York City Center's lower level. The Manhattan Theatre Club performance space comprises a 299-seat theatre with fixed seating (Stage I)[9] and a 150-seat 'studio' theatre with variable seating configurations (Stage II).

References

  1. ^ Manhattan Theatre Club List of Awards Won by MTC, accessed August 18, 2015
  2. ^ Manhattan Theatre Club List of Awards Won by MTC, accessed August 18, 2015
  3. ^ "The Lucille Lortel Awards". Lortel.org. 2013-05-05. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ The Broadway League. "Manhattan Theatre Club (Lynne Meadow, Artistic Director; Barry Grove, Executive Producer) | IBDB: The official source for Broadway Information". IBDB. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  5. ^ "Awards". Manhattan Theatre Club. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  6. ^ "About MTC" mtc-nyc.org, accessed August 3, 2011
  7. ^ Kuchwara, Michael. "A nonprofit success story makes the big move to Broadway", The Associated Press, May 22, 2001 (no page number)
  8. ^ Jones, Kenneth.Broadway's Biltmore Becomes the Friedman on Sept. 4" playbill.com, September 4, 2008
  9. ^ Gussow, Mel. "Manhattan Theatre Club Moving To City Center Space", The New York Times, October 24, 1984, Section C; p.21

External links

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