World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Marie d'Agoult

Article Id: WHEBN0000180579
Reproduction Date:

Title: Marie d'Agoult  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Lisztomania (film), Étude Op. 25, No. 12 (Chopin), Categories for discussion/Log/2013 April 3, Père Lachaise Cemetery, Émile Ollivier
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Marie d'Agoult

Marie d'Agoult (1843), painting by Henri Lehmann.

Marie Catherine Sophie, Comtesse d'Agoult (31 December 1805 – 5 March 1876), was a French author, known also by her pen name, Daniel Stern.

Life

Marie was born in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, as Marie Catherine Sophie de Flavigny, the daughter of Alexander Victor François, Vicomte de Flavigny (1770–1819), a footloose émigré French aristocrat, and his wife Maria Elisabeth Bethmann (1772–1847), a German banker's daughter. The young Marie spent her early years in Germany and completed her education in a French convent after the Bourbon Restoration.

She entered into an early marriage of convenience with Charles Louis Constant d'Agoult, Comte d'Agoult (1790–1875) on 16 May 1827, thereby becoming the Comtesse d'Agoult. They had two daughters, Louise (1828–1834) and Claire (1830–1912). They were divorced on 19 August 1835.

From 1835 to 1839, she lived with virtuoso pianist and composer Franz Liszt, who was six years younger, and was then a rising concert star. She became close to Liszt's circle of friends, including Frédéric Chopin, who dedicated his 12 Études, Op. 25 to her (his earlier set of 12 Études, Op. 10 had been dedicated to Liszt). D'Agoult had three children with Liszt; however, she and Liszt did not marry, maintaining their independent views and other differences while Liszt was busy composing and touring throughout Europe.

Their children were:

  • Blandine (1835–1862), who was the first wife of future French prime minister Émile Ollivier but died at the age of 26
  • Cosima (1837–1930), who first married pianist and conductor Hans von Bülow and then composer Richard Wagner, and
  • Daniel (1839–1859), who was already a promising pianist and gifted scholar when he died of tuberculosis.

In 1876, she died in Paris, aged 70, and was buried in Division 54 of Père Lachaise Cemetery.

She was portrayed by Judy Davis).

Works

d'Agoult in 1861. Photo by Adam-Salomon.

Her first stories (Hervé, Julien, and Valentia) were published in 1841-1845. Her best-known work (written as "Daniel Stern") is the Histoire de la révolution de 1848 (appearing from 1850–53, in 3 volumes). D'Agoult's other works include the novel Nélida (1846), Lettres Républicaines in Esquisses morales et politiques (1849, collected articles), Trois journées de la vie de Marie Stuart (1856), Florence et Turin (1862), Histoire des commencements de la république aux Pays-Bas (1872), "A Catholic Mother Speaks to Her Children" (1906, posthumously), and Mes souvenirs (1877, posthumously).

See also

Further reading

  • Cronin, Vincent. Four Women in Pursuit of an Ideal. London: Collins, 1965; also published as The Romantic Way. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1966.
  • Stock-Morton, Phyllis. The life of Marie d'Agoult, alias Daniel Stern. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-8018-6313-9.

References

  • A Catholic Mother Speaks to Her Children", De Flavigny, Marie. Catholic Encyclopedia, New Haven, Ct. 1906, Outskirts Press. 2011 edition
  • Encyclopedia of 1848 Revolutions
  • Yates, Jim: Oh! Père Lachaise:Oscar's Wilde Purgatory, Édition d'Amèlie 2007: ISBN 978-0-9555836-1-2. Marie meets Oscar in Purgatory and helps to rescue his soul from eternal torment.

External links

}}}}}}} |

  • Synthesist
  • Vegan
  • Without adjectives
  • | group2 =

    | list2 =

    | group3 = People | list3 =

    | group4 = Issues | list4 =

    | group

    This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
     
    Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
     
    By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
     


    Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
    a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.