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Massachusetts's 11th congressional district

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Title: Massachusetts's 11th congressional district  
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Subject: List of United States Representatives from Massachusetts, James A. Burke (Massachusetts politician), Aaron Hobart, Joseph Richardson (U.S. politician), Massachusetts's 7th congressional district
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Massachusetts's 11th congressional district

Massachusetts's 11th congressional district, 1901
Massachusetts's current districts, since 2013

Massachusetts Congressional District 11 is an obsolete congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. It was eliminated in 1993 after the 1990 U.S. Census. Its last Congressman was Brian Donnelly; its most notable were former President John Quincy Adams, future president John F. Kennedy and Speaker Tip O'Neill.

Cities and towns in the district

1790s-1880s

1890s

1893: Suffolk County: Boston, Wards 21, 22. 23, 25. "Middlesex County: City of Newton, towns of Belmont, Holliston, Sherborn, and Water- town. Norfolk County: Towns of Bellingham, Brookline, Dedham, Dover, Foxboro, Franklin, Hyde Park, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Needham, Norfolk, Norwood, Sharon, Walpole, and Wrentham. Bristol County: Town of North Attleboro. Worcester County: Towns of Hopedale and Milford."[1]

1910s-1940s

1916: Suffolk County: Boston Wards 10, 11 (Precincts 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), 12, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23.[2]

1921: Boston (Wards 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 22, 23).[3]

1941: Boston (Wards 1, 2, 3, 22), Cambridge, Somerville (Wards 1, 2, 3).[4]

1960s-1980s

1968: "Norfolk County: City of Quincy. Towns of Avon, Braintree, Canton, Dedham, Holbrook, Milton, Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton, and Weymouth. Plymouth County: City of Brockton. Suffolk County: City of Boston: Ward 18."[5]

1977: "Norfolk County: City of Quincy. Towns of Avon, Braintree, Holbrook, Milton, Randolph, and Stoughton. Plymouth County: City of Brockton. Towns of Abington and Whitman. Suffolk County: City of Boston: Wards 15, 16, 17, 18."[6]

1985: "Norfolk County: City of Quincy. Towns of Avon, Braintree, Holbrook, Milton, Randolph, and Weymouth. Plymouth County: City of Brockton. Towns of Abington, East Bridgewater, Rockland, West Bridgewater, and Whitman. Suffolk County: City of Boston: Wards 15, 16, 17, and 18."[7]

List of representatives

Representative Party Years District home Electoral history
Theophilus Bradbury Federalist March 4, 1795 –
July 24, 1797
Newburyport Resigned to become a state Massachusetts Supreme Court Justice
Vacant July 25, 1797 –
November 26, 1797
Bailey Bartlett Federalist November 27, 1797 –
March 3, 1801
Essex County Retired
Menasseh Cutler Federalist March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Hamilton Redistricted to the 3rd district
William Stedman Federalist March 4, 1803 –
July 16, 1810
Resigned to serve as Clerk of Courts for Worcester County
Vacant July 16, 1810 –
October 8, 1810
Abijah Bigelow Federalist October 8, 1810 –
March 3, 1815
Leominster Retired
Elijah Brigham Federalist March 4, 1815 –
February 22, 1816
Westborough
(now Northborough)
Redistricted from the 10th district,
Died
Vacant February 22, 1816 –
December 1, 1816
Benjamin Adams Federalist December 2, 1816 –
March 3, 1821
Uxbridge Lost re-election
Johnathan Russell Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Aaron Hobart Adams-Clay
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Redistricted from the 8th district
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Joseph Richardson Adams March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
John Quincy Adams Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
Braintree Redistricted to the 12th district
John Reed, Jr. Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
Anti-
Masonic
March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
Barker Burnell Whig March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
Redistricted to the 10th district
District eliminated 1843
District recreated 1853
John Z. Goodrich Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Redistricted from the 7th district
Mark Trafton Know
Nothing
March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Henry L. Dawes[8] Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1863
Redistricted to the 10th district
District eliminated 1863
District recreated 1873
Henry L. Dawes Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Redistricted from the 10th district
Chester W. Chapin Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
[10] Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1883
Redistricted to the 12th district
William Whiting Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1889
Rodney Wallace Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
Frederick S. Coolidge Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
William F. Draper Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
Charles F. Sprague[11] Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1901
Samuel L. Powers Republican March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
Newton Redistricted to the 12th district
John Andrew Sullivan Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
Boston
Andrew J. Peters[12] Democratic March 4, 1907 –
August 15, 1914
Boston Resigned after being appointed Asst. Secretary to the US Treasury Department
Vacant August 15, 1914 –
March 4, 1915
George H. Tinkham Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1933
Boston Redistricted to the 10th district
John J. Douglass Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
Boston Redistricted from the 10th district
John P. Higgins Democratic January 3, 1935 –
September 30, 1937
Boston Resigned after being appointed as chief justice of Superior Court of Massachusetts
Vacant September 30, 1937 –
December 14, 1937
Thomas A. Flaherty[13] Democratic December 14, 1937 –
January 3, 1943
Boston Retired
James Michael Curley Democratic January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1947
Boston Retired
John F. Kennedy Democratic January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1953
Boston Elected to US Senate
Tip O'Neill Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1963
Cambridge Redistricted to the 8th district
James A. Burke[5] Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1979
Milton Redistricted from the 13th district
Brian J. Donnelly[14] Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1993
Boston Retired
District eliminated January 3, 1993

References

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  4. ^
  5. ^ a b
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

External links

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