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Massachusetts general election, 2006

 

Massachusetts general election, 2006

A Massachusetts general election was held on November 7, 2006 in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

The election included:

Contents

  • Statewide elections 1
    • United States Senator 1.1
    • Governor & Lieutenant Governor 1.2
    • Attorney General 1.3
    • Secretary of the Commonwealth 1.4
    • Treasurer and Receiver-General 1.5
    • Auditor 1.6
  • District elections 2
    • U.S. House of Representatives 2.1
    • State House of Representatives 2.2
    • State Senate 2.3
    • Governor's Council 2.4
  • Ballot questions 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5
    • Campaign sites 5.1

Statewide elections

United States Senator

Democratic incumbent Ted Kennedy was re-elected over his Republican challenger Kenneth Chase.

Governor & Lieutenant Governor

Democrats Deval Patrick and Tim Murray were elected Governor and Lieutenant Governor, respectively, over Green-Rainbow candidates Grace Ross and Martina Robinson, independent candidates Christy Mihos and John J. Sullivan, and Republican candidates Kerry Healey and Reed Hillman. Patrick and Murray were nominated over gubernatorial candidates Chris Gabrieli and Tom Reilly, and lieutenant candidates Deb Goldberg and Andrea Silbert.

Attorney General

Martha Coakley (D), the outgoing Middlesex District Attorney who gained national prominence for her role as prosecutor in the Neil Entwistle murder case, was elected Attorney General, defeating Larry Frisoli (R), a trial attorney from Belmont[1] who was known for his handling of the Jeffery Curley case against NAMBLA and was a former Vice Mayor of Cambridge and Norfolk County District Attorney.

Massachusetts Attorney General Election, 2006[2]
(unofficial results)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Martha Coakley 1,542,319 73.02% -26.22%
Republican Larry Frisoli 569,822 26.98% +26.98%
Democratic hold Swing
Source Date MoE Coakley (D) Frisoli (R) Und.
Suffolk University October 20–23, 2006 ±4.9% 59% 18% 14%
Suffolk University October 2–4, 2006 ±4.4% 52% 15% 33%
Suffolk University August 17–21, 2006 ±4.0% 50% 9% 39%
Suffolk University June 22–26, 2006 ±4.0% 50% 16% 33%
Suffolk University May 3, 2006 ±4.9% 49% 13% 36%

Secretary of the Commonwealth

Democratic incumbent William F. Galvin was re-nominated over challenger John C. Bonifaz, a voting-rights activist who founded the National Voting Rights Institute, and defeated Green-Rainbow nominee Jill Stein, a medical doctor and community activist who ran for governor in 2002.

Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth Election, 2006[3]
(unofficial results)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic William F. Galvin 1,635,714 82.31% +9.86%
Green-Rainbow Jill Stein 351,495 17.69% +17.69%
Democratic hold Swing
Source Date MoE Candidates
General Election Galvin (D) Stein (GR) Und.
Suffolk University October 20–23, 2006 ±4.9% 57% 13% 31%
Suffolk University October 2–4, 2006 ±4.4% 56% 11% 33%
Suffolk University August 17–21, 2006 ±4.0% 54% 11% 35%
Suffolk University June 22–26, 2006 ±4.0% 52% 9% 35%
Suffolk University May 3, 2006 ±4.9% 46% 10% 43%
Suffolk University April 3, 2006 ±4.9% 46% 8% 44%
Democratic Secretary of the Commonwealth Primary[4]
Candidate Votes % ±%
William F. Galvin 633,035 82.84%
John Bonifaz 129,012 17%
Write-in 1,997 0.26%
Blanks 162,358
Turnout 926,402
Source Date MoE Candidates
Democratic Primary William F. Galvin John Bonifaz Und
Suffolk University August 17–21, 2006 ±5.1% 49% 5% 46%
Suffolk University June 22–26, 2006 ±4.0% 50% 9% 38%

Treasurer and Receiver-General

Democratic incumbent Timothy P. Cahill was re-elected over Green-Rainbow candidate James O'Keefe, who also ran in 2002. Republican Ronald K. Davy, a financial analyst and Hull selectman, was nominated but failed to reach signature requirement to qualify for the ballot.[5]

Massachusetts Treasurer Election, 2006[6]
(unofficial results)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Tim Cahill 1,641,196 83.58% +32.92%
Green-Rainbow James O'Keefe 322,493 16.42% +8.46%
Democratic hold Swing
Source Date MoE Cahill (D) O'Keefe (GR) Davy (R) Und.
Suffolk University October 20–23, 2006 ±4.9% 56% 15% 29%
Suffolk University October 2–4, 2006 ±4.4% 51% 11% 37%
Suffolk University August 17–21, 2006 ±4.0% 48% 10% 42%
Suffolk University June 22–26, 2006 ±4.0% 47% 7% 10% 35%
Suffolk University May 3, 2006 ±4.9% 46% 6% 6% 41%
Suffolk University April 3, 2006 ±4.9% 40% 21% 30%

Auditor

  • Massachusetts Common Cause - supporting independent redistricting commission
  • Home From Iraq Now - supporting withdrawal of Massachusetts National Guard from Iraq
  • MassACT: Affordable Care Today! - supporting the "Affordable Health Care Act"
  • Vote on Marriage - supporting constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage

Not on state-wide ballot in 2006:

  • Massachusetts Ballot Freedom Campaign - supporting Question 2, allowing NY-style party fusion

Question 2 - Nomination of Candidates for Public Office:

  • LWV Question One Summary - includes link to full text
  • Yes on 1: Grocery Stores and Consumers for Fair Competition
  • No on 1: Wine Merchants and Concerned Citizens for S.A.F.E.T.Y. (Stop Alcohol’s Further Extension to Youth)
  • Massachusetts Food Association - supporting Question 1, the selling of wine in grocery stores

Ballot Questions
Question 1 - Sale of Wine by Food Stores:

  • John Bonifaz (D)
  • William F. Galvin (D)
  • Jill Stein (GR)

Secretary of the Commonwealth

  • Martha Coakley (D)
  • Larry Frisoli (R)

Attorney General

Campaign sites

  • Elections Division, Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth- Official government site.

External links

  1. ^ "Frisoli runs for AG" Belmont Citizen-Herald
  2. ^ 2006 Massachusetts General Election Results - Attorney General - Boston Globe Boston.com last updated: 12:48 PM November 8, 2006
  3. ^ 2006 Massachusetts General Election Results - Secretary of State - Boston Globe Boston.com last updated: 12:48 PM November 8, 2006
  4. ^ State Primary Election Results 2006 Massachusetts Elections Division: Official Results (PDF, 196k)
  5. ^ Republican down ballot candidates struggle Boston Globe June 1, 2006
  6. ^ 2006 Massachusetts General Election Results - Treasurer - Boston Globe Boston.com last updated: 12:48 PM November 8, 2006
  7. ^ "Why I'm Running for Auditor" Posted by Rand Wilson July 7, 2006 at Blue Mass. Group
  8. ^ Boston Globe "Bolton consultant plans run for state auditor"
  9. ^ 2006 Massachusetts General Election Results - Auditor - Boston Globe Boston.com last updated: 12:48 PM November 8, 2006
  10. ^ Secretary of the Commonwealth's ballot questions page
  11. ^ CBS News ballot questions page
  12. ^ Boston.com Ballot Question Section
  13. ^ a b c 2006 Massachusetts Election Results - Statewide and local ballot questions Boston.com November 8, 2006

References

Source Date MoE Question Yes No Und
UNH/Globe October 22–25, 2006 ±4.1% Wine in food stores 57% 38% 5%
Suffolk University October 20–23, 2006 ±4.9% Wine in food stores 52% 40% 8%
Fusion voting 26% 51% 23%
Collective bargaining for childcare providers 34% 36% 30%
Suffolk University October 10–11, 2006 ±4.9% Wine in food stores 50% 41% 9%
Suffolk University October 2–4, 2006 ±4.4% Wine in food stores 47% 44% 9%
Fusion voting 27% 48% 24%
Collective bargaining for childcare providers 42% 33% 25%
Suffolk University August 17–21, 2006 ±4.0% Wine in food stores 54% 38% 8%
Fusion voting 35% 48% 18%
Collective bargaining for childcare providers 46% 32% 22%
Suffolk University June 27, 2006 ±4.0% Wine in food stores 61% 31% 9%
Fusion voting 34% 48% 19%
Collective bargaining for childcare providers 42% 37% 22%
Question 3: Family Care Worker Unionization[13]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 951,988 48%
No 1,035,707 52%
Question 2: Fusion Voting[13]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 688,096 35%
No 1,302,143 65%
Question 1: Wine in Food Stores[13]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 915,076 44%
No 1,180,708 56%
  • Question 1 - Sale of Wine by Food Stores. A law to allow local authorities to license stores selling groceries to sell wine.
  • Question 2 - Nomination of Candidates for Public Office. A law to create "more ballot choices" by allowing for fusion voting.
  • Question 3 - Family Child Care Providers. A law to allow home-based family child care providers providing state-subsidized care to bargain collectively with the state government.

Statewide Questions:

There were three statewide ballot questions, all initiatives, which the Massachusetts voters voted on this election, and all were defeated.[10][11][12] There were also various local ballot questions around the state.

Ballot questions

See Massachusetts Governor's Council election, 2006

Governor's Council

see Massachusetts Senate election, 2006

State Senate

see Massachusetts House election, 2006

State House of Representatives

see Massachusetts United States House election, 2006

U.S. House of Representatives

District elections

Source Date MoE DeNucci (D) Wilson (WF) Und.
Suffolk University October 20–23, 2006 ±4.9% 56% 10% 35%
Suffolk University October 2–4, 2006 ±4.4% 48% 13% 38%
Suffolk University August 17–21, 2006 ±4.0% 46% 11% 42%
Massachusetts Auditor Election, 2006[9]
(unofficial results)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic A. Joseph DeNucci 1,563,716 80.89% +3.02%
Working Families Rand Wilson 369,513 19.11% +19.11%
Democratic hold Swing

and a Whatley School Committee member, dropped out of the race for personal reasons in late March 2006. Smith College, a physicist from Nathanael Fortune candidate Green-Rainbow also failed to reach signature requirement to qualify for the ballot, and [8],Bolton, a 52-year-old small-business consultant from Earle Stroll nominee Republican [7]

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