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Million Book Project

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Title: Million Book Project  
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Million Book Project

The Million Book Project (or the Universal Library), was a book digitization project, led by Carnegie Mellon University School of Computer Science and University Libraries.[1] Working with government and research partners in India (Digital Library of India) and China, the project scanned books in many languages, using OCR to enable full text searching, and providing free-to-read access to the books on the web. As of 2007, they have completed the scanning of 1 million books and have made accessible the entire database from http://www.ulib.org/ and https://archive.org/details/universallibrary.

Contents

  • Description 1
  • Partner institutions 2
    • China 2.1
    • India 2.2
    • USA 2.3
    • Europe 2.4
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Description

The Million Book Project was a 501(c)3 charity organization with various scanning centers throughout the world.

By December 2007, more than 1.5 million books had been scanned, in 20 languages: 970,000 in Chinese; 360,000 in English; 50,000 in Telugu; and 40,000 in Arabic.[2] Most of the books are in the public domain, but permission has been acquired to include over 60,000 copyrighted books (roughly 53,000 in English and 7,000 in Indian languages). The books are mirrored in part at sites in India, China, Carnegie Mellon, the Internet Archive, Bibliotheca Alexandrina. The books that have been scanned to date are not yet all available online, and no single site has copies of all the books that are available online.

The million book project was a "proof of concept" that has largely been replaced by Google Book Search and the Internet Archive book scanning projects.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded Carnegie Mellon $3.63M over four years for equipment and administrative travel for the Million Book Project. India provided $25M annually to support language translation research projects. The Ministry of Education in China provided $8.46M over three years. The Internet Archive provided equipment, staff and money. The University of California, Merced Library funded the work to acquire copyright permission from U.S. publishers.

Partner institutions

China

The institutions in China which are participants in this project include:[1]

India

The institutions in India which are participants in this project include:[1]

USA

The institutions in the U.S. which are participants include:[1]

Europe

The institutions in the EU which are participants include:[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "ULIB [About Us]". Carnegie Mellon University. 
  2. ^ "The Million Book Project - 1.5 million scanned!". London Business School Library. Archived from the original on 2008-06-14. 

External links

  • The Universal Digital Library
  • The Million Book Digital Library Project
    • Frequently Asked Questions
  • (Chinese) Universal Library, China site
  • Universal Digital Library at Allahabad
  • Digital Library of India
  • Internet Archive:
    • the archived pilot
    • larger partial collection
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