Miserentissimus Redemptor

Miserentissimus Redemptor is the title of an encyclical by Pope Pius XI, issued on May 8, 1928 on reparation to the Sacred Heart.[1] This encyclical deals with the concepts of Acts of Reparation and atonement.

Referencing Pope Leo XIII's encyclical, Annum Sacrum, Pius stated, "For as in olden time when mankind came forth from Noe's ark, God set His "bow in the clouds" (Genesis ix, 13), shining as the sign of a friendly covenant; so in the most turbulent times of a more recent age, ... then the most benign Jesus showed his own most Sacred Heart to the nations lifted up as a standard of peace and charity portending no doubtful victory in the combat."[2]


In this encyclical Pope Pius XI defined reparation as follows:

"The creature's love should be given in return for the love of the Creator, another thing follows from this at once, namely that to the same uncreated Love, if so be it has been neglected by forgetfulness or violated by offense, some sort of compensation must be rendered for the injury, and this debt is commonly called by the name of reparation."[3]

In the encyclical, Pope Pius XI called acts of reparation a duty for Roman Catholics.

The encyclical is also noteworthy in that in it Pope Pius XI confirms the Church's position with respect to the visions of Jesus Christ reported by Saint Marguerite Marie Alacoque in the 17th Century. In the encyclical Pope Pius XI stated that Jesus Christ had "manifested Himself" to Saint Margaret and had "promised her that all those who rendered this honor to His Sacred Heart would be endowed with an abundance of heavenly graces." The encyclical refers to the conversation between Jesus and Saint Margaret several times.

See also

References

  1. ^ Raymond Burke, 2008, Mariology: A Guide for Priests, Deacons,seminarians, and Consecrated Persons, Queenship Publishing ISBN 1-57918-355-7 page 489
  2. ^ [Pope Pius XI, "Miserentissimus Redemptor", ยง2, Libreria Editrice Vaticana]
  3. ^ Vatican website: Miserentissimus Redemptor
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