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Mitsubishi 6A1 engine

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Title: Mitsubishi 6A1 engine  
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Mitsubishi 6A1 engine

6A1
Overview
Manufacturer Mitsubishi Motors
Production 1992–present
Combustion chamber
Cylinder block alloy Cast iron
Cylinder head alloy Aluminium alloy

The Mitsubishi 6A1 engine is a series of V6 engines from Mitsubishi Motors, found in their small and medium vehicles through the 1990s. They ranged from 1.6 L to 2.5 L in size, and came with a variety of induction methods and cylinder head designs and configurations.

Although now out of production, the 1600 cc 6A10 still holds the distinction of being the smallest modern production V6.

Contents

  • 6A10 1
    • DOHC 1.1
      • Applications 1.1.1
  • 6A11 2
    • SOHC 2.1
      • Applications 2.1.1
  • 6A12 3
    • DOHC 3.1
      • Applications 3.1.1
    • DOHC & sports ECU 3.2
      • Applications 3.2.1
    • MIVEC 3.3
      • Applications 3.3.1
    • DOHC twin turbo 3.4
      • Applications 3.4.1
  • 6A13 4
    • SOHC 4.1
      • Applications 4.1.1
    • DOHC twin turbo 4.2
      • Applications 4.2.1
  • See also 5
  • References 6

6A10

  • Displacement — 1597 cc
  • Bore — 73.0 mm
  • Stroke — 63.6 mm

DOHC

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder DOHC 24-valve
  • Compression ratio — 10.0:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 103 kW (140 PS; 138 hp) at 7000 rpm
  • Peak torque — 147 N·m (108 lb·ft) at 4500 rpm

Applications

6A11

  • Displacement — 1829 cc
  • Bore — 75.0 mm
  • Stroke — 69.0 mm

SOHC

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder SOHC 24-valve
  • Compression ratio — 9.5:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 99 kW (135 PS; 133 hp) at 6000 rpm
  • Peak torque — 167 N·m (123 lb·ft) at 4500 rpm

Applications

6A12

6A12 MIVEC V6 fitted to a Mitsubishi FTO
  • Displacement — 1998 cc
  • Bore — 78.4 mm
  • Stroke — 69.0 mm

DOHC

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder DOHC 24-valve (Mivec)
  • Compression ratio — 9.5:1, 10.0:1, 10.4:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 107–110 kW (145–150 PS; 143–148 hp) at 6000–6750 and 200hp at 7500rpm - mivec version rpm
  • Peak torque — 179–181 N·m (132–133 lb·ft) at 4000–4500 and 210 mivec version rpm

Applications

DOHC & sports ECU

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder DOHC 24-valve
  • Compression ratio — 10.0:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power (1994–1996) — 127–132 kW (173–179 PS; 170–177 hp) at 7000 rpm
  • Peak torque — 191 N·m (141 lb·ft) at 4000 rpm

Applications

MIVEC

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder DOHC 24-valve MIVEC
  • Compression ratio — 10.0:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 147 kW (200 PS; 197 hp) at 7500 rpm
  • Peak torque — 200 N·m (148 lb·ft) at 6500 rpm

Applications

DOHC twin turbo

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder QUADCAM 24-valve
  • Compression ratio — 8.5:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 177 kW (241 PS; 237 hp) at 6000 rpm
  • Peak torque — 309 N·m (228 lb·ft) at 4000 rpm

Applications

6A13

  • Displacement — 2498 cc
  • Bore — 81.0 mm
  • Stroke — 80.8 mm

SOHC

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder SOHC 24-valve
  • Compression ratio — 9.0, 9.5:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 120–129 kW (163–175 PS; 161–173 hp) at 5750 rpm
  • Peak torque — 223–230 N·m (164–170 lb·ft) at 4500 rpm

From 2000 to 2006 the engine goes up in hp to 196hp in all versions with INVECS-II

Applications

DOHC twin turbo

  • Engine type — V type 6-cylinder DOHC 24-valve
  • Compression ratio — 8.5:1
  • Fuel system — ECI multi
  • Peak power — 206 kW (280 PS; 276 hp) at 5500 rpm
  • Peak torque — 363 N·m (268 lb·ft) at 4000 rpm

Applications

See also

References

  • "Engine Epic Part 8 - Mitsubishi Engines", Michael Knowling, Autospeed, issue 48, 21 September 1999
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