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Moonlight in Vermont (song)

 

Moonlight in Vermont (song)

"Moonlight in Vermont" is a popular song about the U.S. state of Vermont, written by John Blackburn (lyrics) and Karl Suessdorf (music) and published in 1944.[1]

The lyrics are unusual in that they do not rhyme.[1] John Blackburn, the lyricist, has been quoted as saying, "After completing the first 12 bars of the lyric, I realized there was no rhyme and then said to Karl, 'Let’s follow the pattern of no rhyme throughout the song. It seemed right.'"[2] The lyrics are also unconventional in that each verse (not counting the bridge) is a haiku.[1]

The song is considered an unofficial state song of Vermont and is frequently played as the first dance song at Vermont wedding receptions. It was first introduced by Margaret Whiting in a 1944 recording,[1] and has been covered by numerous other artists over the years.[N 1]

There are few meadowlarks in Vermont; Blackburn, who wrote the lyrics, was from Ohio. The sycamore trees in the song refer to maple trees by their British appellation.

Contents

  • Versions 1
  • Notes 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Versions

Notes

  1. ^ Captain Beefheart's song "Moonlight on Vermont", on his 1969 album Trout Mask Replica, is unrelated.

References

  1. ^ a b c d Jazz Standards, Songs and Instrumentals
  2. ^ Sheila Davis (1984) The Craft of Lyric Writing , Writer's Digest Books, Cincinnati ISBN 0-89879-149-9
  3. ^ One by OneThe Coasters, Retrieved February 14, 2012.
  4. ^ "Billie Holiday Discography". jazzdisco.org. 

External links

  • Analysis of "Moonlight in Vermont" at Jazz Standards
  • Full lyrics of this song at MetroLyrics
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