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Mother Serbia

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Title: Mother Serbia  
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Subject: Serbian nationalism, Wanjiku, Allegory of Hispania, National symbols of Serbia, Polonia (personification)
Collection: National Personifications, National Symbols of Serbia, Serbian Nationalism
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Mother Serbia

"Mother Serbia and son Serb", a 19th-century lithography

Mother Serbia (Serbian: Majka Srbija/Мајка Србија, German: Mutter Serbien), Serb Mother (Srpska majka/Српска мајка) or Mother of All Serbs[1] is a national personification of Serbia, which is the nation-state of Serbs. It was used as the metaphoric mother of all Serbs.[1] Serbian national myths and poems constantly invoke Mother Serbia.[2]

The territories inhabited by ethnic Serbs outside Serbia can be represented as the children of Mother Serbia.[3] Serbia may also be described as a daughter of Mother Serbia, alongside other Serb territories, as in Dragoslav Knežević's poem Mother Serbia: "One sister younger than the older Montenegro and Serbia, In peacetime and in war Krajina joins the Serbian flock".[3]

Contents

  • History 1
    • 19th century 1.1
    • Inter-war period 1.2
    • World War II 1.3
    • Yugoslav Wars 1.4
  • Use in art 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

19th century

Dositej Obradović (1739–1811) extensively used Mother Serbia in his works.[4]

On February 24, 1874, the "Serbian Liberation Committee for the Sanjak of Niš", known simply as the Niš Committee, was founded by local notables. Orthodox priest Petar Ikonomović swore Oath on the Christian cross and Gospel, reminiscent of the Orašac Assembly (1804).[5] Ikonomović said:

Inter-war period

In 1940, Pavle Tatić wrote the drama Srpska majka.[8]

World War II

The propaganda of the Serbian puppet Government of National Salvation included promoting Milan Nedić as "Mother of the Serbs", claiming that he cared and shielded the Serbs.[9]

Yugoslav Wars

The expression was used during the Yugoslav Wars, referring to Mother Serbia's children in the west (outside Serbia and Montenegro) as the Republic of Serbian Krajina and Republika Srpska.

Milan Martić, President of the Republic of Serbian Krajina (RSK), argued, after the fall of RSK (Operation Storm), that "the people felt they had been deceived and abandoned by mother Serbia" for not protecting RSK.[10]

Use in art

Statue of Mother Serbia at the top of the building of the Government of Serbia.
Statues and sculptures
Songs

See also

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^
  3. ^ a b
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^

External links

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