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Munn v. Illinois

 

Munn v. Illinois

Munn v. Illinois
Argued January 14–18, 1876
Decided March 1, 1877
Full case name Munn v. State of Illinois
Citations 94 U.S. 113 (more)
24 L. Ed. 77; 1876 U.S. LEXIS 1842; 4 Otto 113
Holding
The Fourteenth Amendment does not prevent the State of Illinois from regulating charges for use of a business' grain elevators.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Waite, joined by Clifford, Swayne, Miller, Davis, Bradley, Hunt
Dissent Field, joined by Strong
Laws applied
U.S. Const. amend. XIV

Munn v. Illinois, 94 U.S. 113 (1877),[1] was a United States Supreme Court case in which the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the power of government to regulate private industries.

The case developed as a result of the Illinois legislature’s responding in 1871 to pressure from the National Grange, an association of farmers, by setting maximum rates that private companies could charge for the storage and transport of agricultural products. The Chicago grain warehouse firm of Munn and Scott was subsequently found guilty of violating the law but appealed the conviction on the grounds that the Illinois regulation represented an unconstitutional deprivation of property without due process of law.[2]The Supreme Court decided the appeal in 1877. Chief Justice Morrison Remick Waite spoke for the majority when he said that state power to regulate extends to private industries that affect the public interest. Because grain storage facilities were devoted to public use, their rates were subject to public regulation. Moreover, Waite declared that even though Congress alone is granted control over interstate commerce, a state could take action in the public interest without impairing that federal control.

References

  1. ^ Text of Munn v. Illinois, 94 U.S. 113 (1876) is available from:  Findlaw  Justia 
  2. ^

Further reading

External links

  • Works related to Munn v. Illinois at Wikisource
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