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Nadab of Israel

Nadab from Guillaume Rouillé's Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum

Nadab (Hebrew: נָדָב) was the second king of the northern Israelite Kingdom of Israel. He was the son and successor of Jeroboam.

Reign

Nadab became king of Israel in the second year of Asa, king of Judah, and reigned for two years.[1][2] William F. Albright has dated his reign to 901 - 900 BCE, while E. R. Thiele offers the dates 910 - 909 BCE.[3]

In the second year of his reign, while they were besieging Gibbethon, a Philistine town in southern Dan, a conspiracy broke out in Nadab's own army. He was slain by one of his own captains, Baasha, who then made himself king of Israel.[2]

After having slain Nadab, Baasha put to death the remainder of the royal family (I Kings 14. 20, 15. 25-29). This was consistent with the prophecy given via Ahijah the Shilonite concerning the extinction of the entire House of Jeroboam.[2]

References

  1. ^ 1 Kings 15:25
  2. ^ a b c Jewish Encyclopedia"Nadab",
  3. ^ Edwin Thiele, The Mysterious Numbers of the Hebrew Kings, (1st ed.; New York: Macmillan, 1951; 2d ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965; 3rd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan/Kregel, 1983). ISBN 0-8254-3825-X, 9780825438257
Nadab of Israel
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Jeroboam I
King of Israel
910 BC – 909 BC
Succeeded by
Baasha

 

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