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National Assembly (Nigeria)

National Assembly
Seal of the House of Representatives of Nigeria
Seal of the Senate of Nigeria
Type
Type
Houses Senate
House of Representatives
Leadership
Bukola Saraki (APC)
Since 9 June 2015
Yakubu Dogara (APC)
Since 9 June 2015
Meeting place
National Assembly Building
Website
http://www.nass.gov.ng/
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Nigeria
Nigeria portal

The National Assembly of the Abuja.

Contents

  • Leadership 1
  • Functions 2
  • Support 3
  • National Assembly State Delegations 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Leadership

The Senate is chaired by the President of the Nigerian Senate, the first of whom was Nnamdi Azikiwe, who stepped down from the job to become the country's first Head of State. The House is chaired by the Speaker of the House of Representatives. At any joint session of the Assembly, the President of the Senate presides and in his absence the Speaker of the House presides.

OFFICE NAME TERM
President of the Senate Bukola Saraki 09 June 2015–present
Speaker of the House of Representatives Yakubu Dogara June 2015–present

Functions

The Assembly has broad oversight functions and is empowered to establish committees of its members to scrutinise bills and the conduct of government officials. Since the restoration of democratic rule in 1999, the Assembly has been said to be a "learning process" that has witnessed the election and removal of several Presidents of the Senate, allegations of corruption, slow passage of private member's bills and the creation of ineffective committees to satisfy numerous interests.

In spite of a more than two-thirds majority control of the Assembly by the ruling People's Democratic Party (PDP), the PDP government led by Dr. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan and the Assembly have been known more for their disagreements than for their cooperation. President Goodluck has been accused of being slow to implement policy. Many bills, some from as long ago as 2007, are still awaiting the President's assent. While the Assembly has made strong and often popular efforts to assert its authority and independence against the executive, it is still viewed generally in a negative light by the media and many of the Nigerian people. The Assembly sits for a period of at most four years, after which time the President is required to dissolve it and call a new Assembly into session.

The Senate has the unique power of impeachment of judges and other high officials of the executive including the Federal Auditor-General and the members of the electoral and revenue commissions. This power is, however, subject to prior request by the President. The Senate also confirms the President's nomination of senior diplomats, members of the federal cabinet, federal judicial appointments and independent federal commissions.

Before any bill may become law, it must be agreed to by both the House and the Senate, and receive the President's assent. Should the President delay or refuse assent (veto) the bill, the Assembly may pass the law by two-thirds of both chambers and overrule the veto and the President's consent will not be required. The present Assembly has not hidden its preparedness to overrule the executive where they disagree.

Support

The

  • Official website of the Nigerian National Assembly
  • Assemblyonline news on the National Assembly
  • Official People and Legislature Information Interchange

External links

  1. ^ http://nils.gov.ng/about.php
  2. ^ http://www.nassnig.org/nass2/acts.php
  3. ^ http://www.thenationonlineng.net/2011/mobile/news/47426-constitution-amendment:-%E2%80%98state-assemblies%E2%80%99ve-chance-for-autonomy%E2%80%99.html

References

See also

  1. Abia
  2. Adamawa
  3. Akwa Ibom
  4. Anambra
  5. Bauchi
  6. Bayelsa
  7. Benue
  8. Borno
  9. Cross River
  10. Delta
  11. Ebonyi
  12. Edo
  13. Ekiti
  14. Enugu
  15. Gombe
  16. Imo
  17. Jigawa
  18. Kaduna
  19. Kano
  1. Katsina
  2. Kebbi
  3. Kogi
  4. Kwara
  5. Lagos
  6. Nasarawa
  7. Niger
  8. Ogun
  9. Ondo
  10. Osun
  11. Oyo
  12. Plateau
  13. Rivers
  14. Sokoto
  15. Taraba
  16. Yobe
  17. Zamfara
  18. Abuja FCT

National Assembly State Delegations

[3] only on a lesser scale as the institute was just establishedLibrary of Congress, Congressional Budget Office, Congressional Research Service by US congress The functions of NILS are similar to the services offered to the [2]

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