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New York Slave Revolt of 1712

Part of a series of articles on...

1526 San Miguel de Gualdape
(Spanish Florida, Victorious)
c. 1570 Gaspar Yanga's Revolt
(Veracruz, New Spain, Victorious)
1712 New York Slave Revolt
(British Province of New York, lost)
1733 St. John Slave Revolt
(Danish Saint John, Suppressed)
1739 Stono Rebellion
(British Province of South Carolina, Suppressed)
1741 New York Conspiracy
(Province of New York, Suppressed)
1760 Tacky's War
(British Jamaica, Suppressed)
1791 Mina Conspiracy
(Louisiana (New Spain), Suppressed)
1795 Pointe Coupée Conspiracy
(Louisiana (New Spain), Suppressed)
1791–1804 Haitian Revolution
(French Saint-Domingue, Victorious)
1800 Gabriel Prosser
(Virginia, Suppressed)
1803 Igbo Landing
(Georgia, Suppressed)
1805 Chatham Manor
(Virginia, Suppressed)
1811 German Coast Uprising
(Territory of Orleans, Suppressed)
1815 George Boxley
(Virginia, Suppressed)
1816 Bussa's Rebellion
(British Barbados, Suppressed)
1822 Denmark Vesey
(South Carolina, Suppressed)
1831 Nat Turner's rebellion
(Virginia, Suppressed)
1831–1832 Baptist War
(British Jamaica, Suppressed)
1839 Amistad, ship rebellion
(Off the Cuban coast, Victorious)
1841 Creole case, ship rebellion
(Off the Southern U.S. coast, Victorious)
1842 Slave Revolt in the Cherokee Nation
(Indian Territory, Suppressed)
1859 John Brown's Raid
(Virginia, Suppressed)

The New York Slave Revolt of 1712 was an uprising in New York City, in the British Province of New York, of 23 enslaved Africans who killed nine whites and injured another six. More than three times that number of blacks, 70, were arrested and jailed. Of these, 27 were put on trial, and 21 convicted and executed.

Contents

  • Events 1
  • Aftermath 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4

Events

While in the early 1700s, New York had one of the largest slave populations of any of England’s colonies, slavery in New York differed from some of the other colonies because there were no large [2]

The men gathered on the night of April 6, 1712, and set fire to a building on [2] While the white colonists tried to put out the fire, the enslaved African Americans, armed with guns, hatchets, and swords, attacked them and ran off.[3]

Aftermath

Seventy blacks were arrested and put in jail. Six are reported to have committed suicide. Twenty-seven were put on trial, 21 of whom were convicted and sentenced to death. Twenty were burned to death and one was executed on a breaking wheel. This was a form of punishment no longer used on whites at the time. The severity of punishment was in reaction to white slaveowners' fear of insurrection by slaves.

After the revolt, laws governing the lives of blacks in New York were made more restrictive. African Americans were not permitted to gather in groups of more than three, they were not permitted to carry firearms, and gambling was outlawed. Other crimes, such as property damage, rape, and conspiracy to kill, were made punishable by death. Free blacks were no longer allowed to own land. Slave owners who decided to free their slaves were required to pay a tax of £200, a price much higher than the price of a slave.

References

  1. ^ "Slave Revolt of 1712", Mapping the African American Past, Columbia University
  2. ^ a b Africans in America/Part 1/New York's Revolt of 1712 accessed January 5, 2008.
  3. ^ , E.B. Callaghan, ed (1885)Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New YorkHunter, Robt., in

Further reading

  • Berlin, Ira & Harris, Leslie (2005), Slavery in New York, New York: New Press, .  
  • Horton, James & Horton, Lois (2005), Slavery and the Making of America, New York: Oxford University Press, .  
  • Katz, William Loren (1997), Black Legacy, A History of New York's African Americans, New York: Atheneum, .  
  • Johnson, Mat (2007), The Great Negro Plot, New York: Bloomsbury, (Fiction).  
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