World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Oml

Article Id: WHEBN0000696741
Reproduction Date:

Title: Oml  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: XOXO (microformat), OPML, Web syndication formats, Outliner, List of content syndication markup languages
Collection: Web Syndication Formats, Xml-Based Standards
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Oml

OML (Outline Markup Language) is an XML format for outlines. It was originally proposed by Ray Grieselhuber. The specification is designed to build upon the concepts found in OPML, with the goal of fixing some of its limitations.

OML has a structure similar to OPML. Its advocates claim that although it is as simple and as flexible as OPML, its extension mechanism is better than that of OPML. Instead of letting users add attributes freely, OML introduces an element (child element of ); instances of the element may be added freely.

The resulting documents are claimed to be easier to parse than equivalent OPML documents. Readers of OPML never know what attributes others may have added to standard elements; so an element the reader wants to parse may contain a mixture of known and unknown attributes. This claimed disadvantage of OPML actually applies to any XML-based format, including OML, because XML namespaces may add attributes to existing tags; however, OPML is unusual in its enthusiasm for free-form definition of new attributes. In OML, extensions are added in the form of s instead; an unknown may be discarded without harming known data elsewhere in the file. The approach taken by OML is designed to be more in keeping with the approach of other XML-based languages and with the philosophy of some standards organizations.

Despite its claimed advantages, OML has not seen wide use. Reasons for the greater popularity of OPML may include the relative newness of OML (finalized in May 2003), and non-technical political issues between members of the XML community.

Critics of OML point out OML doesn't have a mechanism to preserve whitespace. Some have also found the distinction between and unnecessary.

See also

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.