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Oregon State Beavers men's basketball

 

Oregon State Beavers men's basketball

Oregon State Beavers
2014–15 Oregon State Beavers men's basketball team
Oregon State Beavers athletic logo
University Oregon State University
All-time record 1,640–1,223
Conference Pac-12
Location Corvallis, OR
Head coach Wayne Tinkle (1st year)
Arena Gill Coliseum
(Capacity: 9,604)
Nickname Beavers
Student section Beaver Dam
Colors

Orange and Black

            
Uniforms
Home jersey
Team colours
Home
Away jersey
Team colours
Away
Alternate jersey
Team colours
Alternate
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1949, 1963
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1949, 1955, 1962, 1963, 1966, 1982
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1955, 1962, 1963 1966, 1975, 1982
NCAA Tournament Round of 32
1947, 1949, 1955, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1975, 1980, 1981, 1982
NCAA Tournament appearances
1947, 1949, 1955, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1975, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990
Conference regular season champions
1916, 1933, 1947, 1949, 1955, 1958, 1966, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1990

The Oregon State Beavers men's basketball program, established in 1901, is the intercollegiate men's basketball program of the Oregon State University Beavers. The program is classified in the NCAA's Division I, and the team competes in the Pacific-12 Conference. OSU is the 20th most successful program of all time as of the end of the 2011–12 season with 111 seasons and a record of 1,640 wins and 1,233 losses.[1] The team plays home games in Gill Coliseum. They are currently coached by Wayne Tinkle.

Contents

  • NCAA record 1
  • Coaches 2
  • Rivalries 3
  • Notable players 4
    • Orange Express 4.1
  • Conferences 5
  • Postseason history 6
  • All-time record vs. Pac-12 opponents 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

NCAA record

Oregon State holds several NCAA basketball records:

Individual Records

  • Field Goal Percentage (Single season)
  • Field Goal Percentage (Career, min. 400 made and 4 made per game)
  • Field Goal Percentage (Single game, min. 12 field goals made)
    • 1st (tie) – 100% Steve Johnson vs. Hawaii-Hilo (13 of 13), Dec. 5, 1979
  • Total Rebounds (Single game)
  • Assists (Career)
  • Average Assists Per Game (Career, min. 550 assists)
  • Steals (Career)

Top Season Performances by Class

  • Senior – Field Goal Percentage
  • Junior – Field Goal Percentage

Team Records

  • Free-Throw Percentage (Single game, min. 30 free throws made)
    • 12th (tie) – 30–31 vs. Memphis, Dec. 19, 1990
  • Steals (Single game)
  • 19th (tie) – 27 vs. Hawaii-Loa, Dec. 22, 1985
  • Field Goal Percentage (Season)
    • 3rd – 56.4% – 1981
    • 25th (tie) – 54.4% – 1980
  • All-Time Victories (Min. 25 years in Division I)
    • 13th – 1,546 games
  • Games played vs. Single Opponent
    • 1st – 332 vs. Oregon
    • 2nd – 275 vs. Washington
    • 4th 270 vs. Washington State
  • Victories vs. Single Opponent
    • 1st – 185 vs. Oregon
    • 6th 159 vs. Washington State

Coaches

The Oregon State men's basketball team has had 21 head coaches and one interim head coach. Both Slats Gill and Ralph Miller are members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. The former coach, Craig Robinson, was hired by OSU in 2008 out of Brown University, where Robinson had just coached the Bears to a school record 19 wins.[2] Robinson is the brother of United States first lady Michelle Obama, and the brother-in-law to United States President Barack Obama.[3] The longest tenured coach is Slats Gill, who was the coach for 36 seasons, winning 599 games in the process. The current coach, Wayne Tinkle, was hired by OSU in 2014 out of Montana, where he coached the Montana Grizzlies men's basketball to a two time Big Sky Conference champions and a school record 25 wins.

Head Coach Years Win-Loss Pct.
J.B. Patterson 1902 1–2 .333
J.W. Viggers 1903 5–1 .883
W.O. Trine 1904–1907 39–7 .848
Roy Heater 1908 7–4 .636
E.D. Angell 1909–1910 19–8 .704
Clifford Reed 1911 3–5 .375
E. J. Stewart 1912–1916 67–33 .670
Everett May 1917 11–7 .611
Howard Ray 1918 15–0 1.000
H. W. Hargiss 1919–1920 10–25 .286
R. B. Rutherford 1921–1922 27–19 .587
Bob Hager 1923–1928 115–53 .685
Slats Gill 1929–1964 599–392 .604
Paul Valenti 1965–1970 91–82 .526
Ralph Miller 1971–1989 359–186 .659
Jim Anderson 1990–1995 79–90 .467
Eddie Payne 1996–2000 52–88 .371
Ritchie McKay 2001–2002 22–37 .372
Jay John 2003–2007 72–97 .426
Kevin Mouton (interim) 2007 0–13 .000
Craig Robinson 2008–2014 93-104 .469
Wayne Tinkle 2014–present 1–0

Rivalries

Oregon Ducks — The Civil War is Oregon State's main rivalry.

Washington HuskiesThe Dog Fight is one of Oregon State's lesser known rivalry games.

Washington State Cougars — The Cougars and Beavers are longtime Pac-12 (and regional) rivals.

Notable players

Oregon State has had 75 all-conference and 32 All-America selections, five Pac-10 Players of the Year, 42 players selected in the NBA Draft, and 24 players that have gone on to play in the NBA.[2][4] Additionally, OSU basketball alumni have 4 gold medals at the Olympics, including one by Lew Beck, who never played in the NBA. A total of 7 players have won 11 NBA titles, including three by A. C. Green, two by Brent Barry, two by Mel Counts, and one each by Red Rocha, Dave Gambee, Lonnie Shelton, and Gary Payton.[5]

The players who have gone on to play in the NBA are:

Oregon State has retired the jersey numbers of five players:[6]

Orange Express

Oregon State's 1980-81 basketball team known as the Orange Express.
The Orange Express with Steve Johnson as #33.

The 1980-1981 Oregon State men's basketball season was arguably one of the best and ironically most upsetting basketball seasons in Oregon State history. The team was referred to as the Orange Express and was led by Beaver legendary coach Ralph Miller.[7][8][9] The Orange Express season was Beaver great, Steve Johnson's, last year at OSU. This season would be the first time in OSU history that the Beavers would win at UCLA. The Orange Express spent a school record 25 weeks as #1 in the polls while finishing with a 26-2 record. At 26-1 the team would go into the NCAA tournament as a number one seed and were upset by number eight seed Kansas State 50-48. Miller was awarded UPI and AP Coach of the Year honors and Steve Johnson would receive All-American honors.[7] Throughout 1980-83 OSU held a 77-11 record which at the time was only bested by DePaul's 79-6 record. This record would include a 35-1 record at Gill Coliseum including a school best 24 wins in a row.[7]

Conferences

Years Conference
1901–1908 Independent
1908–1915 Northwest Conference (NWC)
1915–1959 Pacific Coast Conference (PCC)
1959–1964 Independent
1964–1968 Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU)
1968–1978 Pacific-8 Conference
1978–2011 Pacific-10 Conference
2011–present Pacific-12 Conference

Postseason history

NCAA Tournament (16 appearances)

The Beavers have appeared in 16 NCAA Tournaments.

Year Seed Round Opponent Result/Score
1947 N/A First Round
West Region consolation
Oklahoma
Wyoming
L 55–56
W 63–46
1949 N/A First Round
Final Four
Arkansas
Oklahoma State
W 56–38
L 30–55
1955 N/A First Round
Elite Eight
Seattle
San Francisco
W 83–71
L 56–57
1962 N/A First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Seattle
Pepperdine
UCLA
W 69–65 OT
W 69–67
L 69–88
1963 N/A First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Third Place Game
Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona State
Cincinnati
Duke
W 70–66
W 65–31
W 83–65
L 46–80
L 63–85
1964 N/A First Round Seattle L 57–61
1966 N/A First Round
Elite Eight
Houston
Utah
W 63–60
L 64–70
1975 N/A First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Midwest Region consolation
Middle Tennessee State
Indiana
Central Michigan
W 78–67
L 71–81
L 87–88
1980 2 Second Round Lamar L 77–81
1981 1 Second Round Kansas State L 48–50
1982 2 Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Pepperdine
Idaho
Georgetown
W 70–51
W 60–42
L 45–69
1984 6 First Round West Virginia L 62–64
1985 10 First Round Notre Dame L 70–79
1988 12 First Round Louisville L 61–70
1989 6 First Round Evansville L 90–94 OT
1990 5 First Round Ball State L 53–54

National Invitational Tournament (4 appearances)

1979: lost to Nevada 61-62 (1st Round)

1983: beat Idaho 77-59, beat New Orleans 88-71, lost to Fresno State 67-76 (Quarterfinal)

1987: beat New Mexico 85-82, lost to California 62-65 (2nd Round)

2005: lost to Cal State Fullerton 83-85 (opening round)

College Basketball Invitational (4 appearances, 1 Championship)

2009: beat Houston 49-45, beat Vermont 71-70 OT, beat Stanford 65-62 OT, beat UTEP 75-69, lost to UTEP 63-70, beat UTEP 81-73 (Tournament Champions)

2010: lost to Boston University 78-96 (first round)

2012: beat Western Illinois 80-59, beat TCU 101-81, lost to Washington State 55-72 (semifinals)

2014: lost to Radford 92-96 (first round)

All-time record vs. Pac-12 opponents

The Oregon State Beavers have the following series records vs. Pac-12 opponents. They lead the series against their arch-rival Oregon.

Opponent Wins Losses Pct. Streak
Arizona 20 57 .260 Arizona 6
Arizona St. 42 36 .538 ASU 4
California 60 81 .426 Cal 4
Colorado 4 10 .286 COL 2
Oregon 185 156 .542 Oregon 1
Stanford 72 66 .522 OSU 1
UCLA 35 88 .285 OSU 1
USC 60 66 .476 OSU 1
Utah 10 14 .417 Utah 2
Washington 138 157 .468 UW 3
Wash. St. 166 121 .578 OSU 1
  • Note all-time series includes non-conference matchups.

References

  1. ^ List of teams with the most victories in NCAA Division I men's college basketball
  2. ^ a b "Craig Robinson Era Begins at Oregon State". Retrieved 2008-12-21. 
  3. ^ Reynolds, Bill (2008-02-14). "He’s much more than Obama’s brother-in-law".  
  4. ^ "NBA/ABA Players who attended Oregon State University". Retrieved 2017-12-12. 
  5. ^ "Barry Wins Another NBA Title". Retrieved 2008-12-21. 
  6. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/orst/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/oregon-st-history.pdf
  7. ^ a b c "OSU Sports History Minute". Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  8. ^ "1980-81 OSU Basketball Team". Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  9. ^ "Orange Distress". Retrieved 2010-12-22. 

External links

  • Official site
  • OSU Basketball 2005-2006 Media Guide
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