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Osteosclerosis

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Osteosclerosis

Osteosclerosis
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 M85.8, Q77.4
ICD-9-CM 756.52
DiseasesDB 15823
MeSH D010026

Osteosclerosis is a type of osteopetrosis that involves abnormal hardening of bone[1] and an elevation in bone density.[2] It can be a pathology, normally detected on a radiograph as an area of increased opacity; that is, where more mineral is present in the bone to absorb or deflect the X-ray beam. Localized osteosclerosis can be caused by injuries that compress the bone, by osteoarthritis, and osteoma.

It is associated with:

It can also be associated with Hepatitis C.[5]

In the animal kingdom there also exists a non-pathological form of osteosclerosis, resulting in unusually solid bone structure with little to no marrow. It is often seen in aquatic vertebrates, especially those living in shallow waters,[6] providing ballast as an adaptation for an aquatic existence. It makes bones heavier, but also more fragile. In those animal groups osteosclerosis often occurs together with bone thickening (pachyostosis). This joint occurrence is called pachyosteosclerosis.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Osteosclerosis - Pediatrics". Retrieved 2015-09-29. 
  2. ^ "Medcyclopaedia - Osteosclerosis". Archived from the original on 2012-02-05. Retrieved 2007-12-23. 
  3. ^ Niederhauser, BD; Dingli, D; Kyle, RA; Ringler, MD (July 2014). "Imaging findings in 22 cases of Schnitzler syndrome: characteristic para-articular osteosclerosis, and the "hot knees" sign differential diagnosis.". Skeletal radiology 43 (7): 905–15.  
  4. ^ Soubrier, M; Dubost, JJ; Jouanel, P; Tridon, A; Flori, B; Leguille, C; Ristori, JM; Bussière, JL (1994). "[Multiple complications of monoclonal IgM].". La Revue de medecine interne / fondee ... par la Societe nationale francaise de medecine interne 15 (7): 484–6.  
  5. ^ Fiore CE, Riccobene S, Mangiafico R, Santoro F, Pennisi P (2005). "Hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis (HCAO): report of a new case with involvement of the OPG/RANKL system". Osteoporos Int 16 (12): 2180–4.  
  6. ^ Houssaye, A. (2009). "Pachyostosis" in aquatic amniotes: a review. Integrative Zoology 4(4): 325-340.
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